Tag Archives: STEM

Richland Collegiate High School Paves the Way for Future S.T.E.M. Graduates with New Engineering Pathway

 

Eleven high school juniors from Richland Collegiate High School (RCHS) recently completed the first course in a new engineering pathway, paving the way not only for the students to get a head start on college-level courses while still in high school, but also for the students to become immediately employable, with some students even achieving a level-one manufacturing certification.

The first class in this new pathway was Drafting 1309, an intensive 13-day class taught by Mohammad-Ali Manouchehripour, Ph.D. In addition to basic drafting, students learned computer-aided design (CAD), a basic foundation of engineering, with the software AutoCAD. In this class, students learned how to draw an object and create a blueprint, and later they will actually be able to manufactur those objects.

“I think AutoCAD is a good software to learn in general because it has such a wide range of uses,” said Mitchell Zadnik, one of the RCHS students enrolled in Drafting 1309. “Our instructor told us some people take the class to make jewelry, some people take it for engineering and some people take it for the general knowledge of it.”

Students in the engineering pathway have access to Richland College’s Technology, Engineering and Advanced Manufacturing (TEAM) Center, a multi-million dollar learning space with leading edge, industry-quality technology that allows engineering and manufacturing students to have contemporary, hands-on learning experiences and career-focused training.

“Our students are going to be designing, developing and manufacturing their own parts and then assembling them into their own robotic assessments at the end of the program,” said Craig Hinkle, RCHS principal. “It is a very unique opportunity in public education for 16-year-old high school students to have access to multi-million dollar labs and manufacturing processes. When they leave here, they’ll be employable in the industry before they’ve even received their college degrees.”

“All of the software students learn in this class and this program can be added to their portfolios,” said Manouchehripour. “When they go to job interviews in two years, they will have experience with the software currently being used in the industry. Here at Richland College, everyone is a team. Our main agenda is to make sure we educate students, and to be a supplier to the demands of the local industries.”

When filling the inaugural drafting class, RCHS looked for students who were interested in math, science and engineering; students who may have already been in robotics clubs at their previous high schools; and students who had previously taken advanced math courses. For the duration of their time at RCHS, the students will work closely with RCHS senior academic advisors to develop a continued pathway based on their future educational and career goals.

Most of the 11 students in the inaugural class have dreams to go into various engineering fields, including but not limited to aerospace, biotechnical, software, manufacturing and mechanical. Other career aspirations include architecture, mathematics, marine biology and security.

In a pathway traditionally dominated by men, administrators were also pleased when the inaugural class had more female students than male students.

“More than 50 percent of the students are female, and we are really excited about that,” said Hinkle. “There has been a trend that math and science fields are dominated by males, and we as an American society have been trying to change that. Right now, we actually have about a 60/40 female-to-male ratio, of which we are proud. We hope that will be an inspiration to other female students in the future.”

Johannah Belk, one female RCHS student, joined this program because it offered more opportunities in engineering than her previous high school did.

“I’ve explored many different fields of engineering, but doing AutoCAD all day, every day in this course made me realize it’s what I want to do every day for the rest of my life, which is pretty exciting,” said Belk. “I’m hoping to design locks and go into security. I think the mechanisms inside locks can be advanced with growing technology, and I want to be a part of that.”

Another female RCHS student, Alaina Crowder, joined the program so she could gain college experience in high school before transferring to a four-year university.

“My dream job is to be a manufacturing engineer,” said Crowder. “After taking this class and being shown around a manufacturing lab, I became super interested in that field. I hope I’ll be able to work in a lab like this one someday.”

Richland Collegiate High School is a school designed to provide a rigorous academic experience for high school juniors and seniors. Students complete their last two years of high school at Richland College by taking college courses and earning college credits. These students can potentially graduate with both their high school diploma and an associate degree, prepared to transfer to a four-year university. Tuition and books are free, making RCHS an educational and affordable choice.

For more information about Richland Collegiate High School, visit alt.richlandcollege.edu/rchs.


Richland College Unveils Innovative ‘Technology, Engineering and Advanced Manufacturing’ Center on Campus
Joe May and Kay Eggleston standing at a podium.

Dr. Joe May and Dr. Kay Eggleston speak at the opening of the Richland College TEAM Center, April 21, 2016. Photo by Keenan Cobb.

The Richland College Technology, Engineering and Advanced Manufacturing (TEAM) Center had its grand opening yesterday, advancing the college’s mission of teaching, learning and community building. The new TEAM Center also addresses the need to contribute to the growth of the current and future Dallas economy by developing human capital success of key regional industries and employers.

With leading edge, industry-quality technology, the Richland College TEAM Center offers students hands-on learning experiences and delivers career-focused training leading to high-demand jobs in engineering, electrical engineering technology, electronics technology and advanced manufacturing.

Funding for the TEAM Center design, renovation and equipment was made possible through the $1.5 million portion of equipment funding provided by a $3.2 million Trade Adjustment Assistance Community College and Career Training (TAACCCT) grant from the U.S. Department of Labor; more than $2.7 million from the Dallas County Community College District (DCCCD) Chancellor’s Career Ladder Funds; $1.6 million from Richland College’s institutional funds; and a gift of $500,000 from Texas Instruments Incorporated (TI) to fund the newly-redesigned electrical engineering technology programs at Richland, Eastfield and Mountain View colleges.

“The TEAM Center is fully equipped to provide students exceptional hands-on, industry-specific, degree-focused, problem-based learning experiences and career training with stackable industry-recognized certifications,” said Kathryn K. Eggleston, Ph.D., Richland College president.

President Eggleston and Dr. Joe May, DCCCD chancellor, presided at the open house and ribbon cutting, with special guests including Dr. Peter Balyta, president of Texas Instruments Education Technology, and Edgar Garcia, Workforce Development Specialist with the U.S. Department of Labor.

“The leadership of Dallas County Community College District Chancellor Dr. Joe May has been paramount in the success of the significant public-private partnerships necessary to make this TEAM Center possible,” said Eggleston. “Chancellor May is deeply committed to improving the Dallas economy by helping to grow middle-class jobs to jump start new economic investment and job creation.”

The TEAM Center was designed by Aaron Farmer, Yvette Jarvis and Fred Peña of Booziotis & Company Architects. Also involved in the design and construction process were David Boon and Ken Fulk, project engineers with Reed, Wells, Benson and Company; Jacob Williams, project manager, and Danny Purselley, project superintendent, with Byrne Construction Services; Judy Lembke, construction manager with Lemco Construction Services; and Clyde Porter, DCCCD associate vice chancellor/district architect, and Jean Hill, DCCCD project manager.

The advanced manufacturing program at Richland College prepares students for entry-level manufacturing positions through an associate degree, three certificates and two skills achievement awards. The electrical engineering technology degree and electronics technology degree prepare students for technician-level employment in semiconductor, electronics and related industries through an associate degree or a certificate.


Richland College Earns Tech Titans Award Nomination for S.T.E.M. Summer Camp for Girls

The Metroplex Technology Business Council announced this morning that Richland College is a finalist for the Tech Titan of the Future University Level award for its STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) summer camp for middle school girls. The camp is a partnership with Girls Inc. of Dallas, a nonprofit organization dedicated to inspiring all girls to be strong, smart and bold, and the University of Texas at Dallas.

The camp, called “EUREKA!”, empowers campers to see themselves as an important part of the STEM workforce of the future.

“We are delighted and grateful for this recognition from the Metroplex Technology Business Council,” said Sherry Dean, Ph.D., Richland College professor of speech communication. “In this unique partnership with Girls Inc. of Dallas and the University of Texas at Dallas, we are nurturing a cohort of eighth grade girls over a five-year period. We are growing their academic skills and empowering them to pursue STEM majors and future STEM careers. We believe this program will influence these young women for many years to come.”

The Tech Titans awards consist of 12 categories, with six to 10 nominations and up to four finalists in each category. The winners will be announced Aug. 21 at the Tech Titans Awards Gala at the Intercontinental Hotel in Addison, TX.

The Tech Titans Awards Gala, sponsored by AT&T, recognizes the most elite in North Texas technology – individuals currently transforming the high-tech industry and giving companies that competitive edge. The Tech Titans awards showcase the innovators, adopters and executors impacting the technology industry for the greater good.


Richland College Partners with Girls Inc. to Provide Middle School Girls a Glimpse Into College Life and Access to S.T.E.M. Programs and Careers
Girls huddled around a lab table.

Girls Inc. campers participate in lab activities at Richland College on their first day of camp Monday, June 22. Photograph by Paul Knudsen.

For the second year in a row, Richland College recently partnered with Girls Inc. of Dallas, a nonprofit organization dedicated to inspiring all girls to be strong, smart and bold, to host part of a four-week summer camp for middle school girls.

The camp, called “EUREKA!”, empowers campers to see themselves as an important part of the STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) workforce of the future. Richland College is hosting the first week, June 22-26, which focuses on “Water: Ubiquitous and Unique.” The girls are exploring various properties of Earth’s most important resource in the contexts of sustainability and ecology. The curriculum includes experiential learning activities in the sciences, 3-D art, learning strategies, college readiness and communications skills. Each afternoon, the girls also learn about the physics and fun behind the hula-hoop.

“The unique feature of this program is that we are intentionally nurturing a cohort of girls in STEM fields over a five-year period,” said Sherry Dean, Ph.D., Richland College professor of speech communication. “We will nurture them through high school graduation and help them secure successful higher education pathways in a STEM major. By the time these girls graduate, they will have both the knowledge and confidence to pursue a career in STEM.”

Upon completing their first week of camp at Richland College, the girls will go to the University of North Texas at Dallas, followed by the University of Texas at Dallas. The camp concludes at Cedar Valley College on July 24 with a closing ceremony featuring a rocket launch.

“The accumulation of learning and exposure to STEM over the course of four weeks could have a tremendous impact on a girl’s future,” said Girls Inc. of Dallas CEO Lori Palmer. “We hope to help girls become well equipped for the future by exposing them to diverse opportunities like careers in STEM and ongoing summer learning opportunities.”

The “EUREKA!” program is sponsored in part by SAP Labs, the TI Foundation, ExxonMobil and a $10,000 grant from State Farm that is specifically funding the first week of camp at Richland College.


Richland College Offers Summer Youth Camps in Science, Technology, Engineering and Math

Richland College will host three types of youth camps in the science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) fields this summer. These summer camps will introduce young students to various STEM industries, including programming and game design, animated and sculptural art and robotics.

“Richland College is thrilled once again to be hosting such exciting summer camps,” said Heather Lozano, Richland College’s assistant dean of continuing education and workforce training. “These camps are really a win-win for parents and their children—parents are sending their children to a wonderful learning environment, and the kids are having a great time at camp as they explore these STEM subjects.”

In partnership with the University of Texas at Dallas, Richland College will host a programming summer camp, where campers will learn Scratch, Logo, JavaScript and GameMaker. The sessions will be July 6-10 and July 27-31 and will be split into levels: level one will be for grades three through five, and level two will be for grades six through eight. Campers in level one will attend camp in half-day sessions from either 9 a.m.- noon or 1:30-4:30 p.m. and will be provided computers. Level two campers will attend full-day sessions from 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m., and they will be required to bring a laptop.

New this summer, Richland College will be offering a dynamic art summer camp for children age seven to 12 in partnership with Dynamic Art Design. Campers will create unique animated art projects that incorporate visual designs that the students arrange as their own creations, combining art and technology while also challenging the children to explore the relationship of these ideas with the use of motors, gears and pulleys to take their artwork to an exciting new level. The three sessions for this camp take place June 8-12, July 6-10 and Aug. 27-31, with both morning and afternoon sessions offered from 9-11:30 a.m. and 12:30-3 p.m. respectively.

Teaming up with Robots 4 U, Richland College will also offer its robotics summer camp. This camp combines computer science and engineering with daily robotics challenges and an end-of-the-week competition. Each session is mostly hands-on and includes individual design, building and creating up to seven robots. While beginners are welcome, all levels will find this camp challenging and fun. This camp is for ages seven to 17, and the three sessions take place July 22-26, July 20-24 and Aug. 17-21. Morning and afternoon sessions will be offered at 9-11:30 a.m. and 12:30-3 p.m., and campers should bring their own lunches and drinks.

Registration is currently open for all camps. Space is limited, so early registration is suggested for all camps. For information on all summer camps, including links to registration, visit www.richlandcollege.edu/summercamps.

All three camps will be located on the Richland College campus. Richland College is located at 12800 Abrams Rd. in Dallas.


Richland College Designated as 2015 STEM Jobs Approved College

STEM-related iconsRichland College has been recognized as a 2015 STEM Jobs Approved College by Victory Media for its innovative Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) programs and center.

Richland College is included on the 2015 STEM Jobs Approved College list for its STEM job alignment, STEM job placement and the diversity of its STEM programs.

Richland College’s STEM Center prepares students for work in a competitive science- and technology-based economy and establishes well-defined student career pathways. It provides support and guidance to students pursuing STEM careers, with a special emphasis on women and historically underserved populations with fewer resources. STEM advisors provide recruitment of and focus on new-to-college students who indicate a desire to pursue STEM careers. Using this advising process, students identify and follow clear, direct career pathways with multiple points of advisor contact, mentoring and scholarship opportunities.

“Being a STEM Jobs Approved College shows that Richland College is committed to providing a quality, relevant education to our STEM students that will translate into excellent career prospects,” said Martha Hogan, Richland College’s executive dean of the School of Engineering, Business and Technology. “Our STEM advisors ensure our students have a clear path of study, leading to job opportunities and seamless transfers to four-year institutions. This helps steer our students to success in their chosen STEM fields.”

Richland College was recently chosen to participate in the White House College Opportunity Day of Action, during which President Obama, the First Lady and Vice President Biden announced new actions to help more students prepare for and graduate from college. Richland College committed to expanding its STEM Center to reach more than 4,000 students during the next three to five years with proven programs to increase STEM success.


Richland College Announces Commitment to Expand College Access at White House Event

Richland College president Kathryn K. Eggleston, Ph.D., and Dallas County Community College District chancellor Joe D. May, Ed.D., are joining President Obama, the First Lady, Vice President Biden and hundreds of other college presidents and higher education leaders in Washington, D.C., today to announce new actions to help more students prepare for and graduate from college.

The White House College Opportunity Day of Action will support the President’s commitment to partner with colleges and universities, business leaders and nonprofits to support students across the country to help the nation reach its goal of leading the world in college attainment.

“Richland College is well-positioned to be a part of such an ambitious initiative to assist greater numbers of students in their educational pursuits toward degree completion and well-paying jobs,” said Eggleston.

To be a part of this event, Richland College committed to expanding its Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) Center to reach more than 4,000 students during the next three to five years with proven programs to increase STEM success.

Richland College was able to create the STEM Center by leveraging community partnerships and external resources. Initially partnering with the University of Texas at Dallas as a sub-recipient of a Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics Talent Expansion Program (STEP) grant from the National Science Foundation, Richland College has fully funded its STEM Center to advance STEM-graduate completion.

Richland College’s STEM Center prepares students for work in a competitive science and technology-based economy and establishes well-defined student career pathways. It provides support and guidance to students pursuing STEM careers, with a special emphasis on women and historically underserved populations with fewer resources. STEM advisors provide recruitment of and focus on new-to-college students who indicate a desire to pursue STEM careers. Using this advising process, students identify and follow a clear, direct career pathway with multiple points of advisor contact, mentoring and scholarship opportunities.

“Our STEM advisors and faculty are an invaluable resource to students pursuing STEM degrees,” Eggleston said. “Through them, the students are able to navigate their college experience with greater focus, allowing for a seamless transition to university transfer and excellent job opportunities.”

To attain its goal of reaching more than 4,000 students during the next three to five years, Richland College will establish additional focused career pathway opportunities with universities that include research, design and practice-based experiences. It will also expand its summer Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts and Math (STEAM) Camp designed to serve 8th grade girls in underserved and under-resourced populations in a community partnership with Girls, Inc. The camp is designed and taught by Richland’s STEAM faculty, who are women and minority women, providing role models for young women at a critical age in their aspirational direction.

Participants in the White House College Opportunity Day of Action were asked to commit to new action in one of four areas: building networks of colleges around promoting completion, creating K-16 partnerships around college readiness, investing in high school counselors as part of the First Lady’s Reach Higher initiative or increasing the number of college graduates in the STEM fields.

The President will announce new steps on how his administration is helping to support these actions, including $10 million to help promote college completion and a $30 million AmeriCorps program that will improve low-income students’ access to college. Today’s event is the second College Opportunity Day of Action, and it will include a progress report on the commitments made at the first day of action that took place Jan. 14, 2014.

Expanding opportunity for more students to enroll and succeed in college, especially low-income and underrepresented students, is vital to building a strong economy and a strong middle class. Today, only 9 percent of those born in the lowest family income quartile attain a bachelor’s degree by age 25, as compared to 54 percent in the top quartile. In an effort to expand college access, the Obama Administration has increased Pell scholarships by $1,000 per year, created the new American Opportunity Tax Credit worth up to $10,000 over four years of college, limited student loan payments to 10 percent of income and laid out an ambitious agenda to reduce college costs and promote innovation and completion.


First week of Girls Inc. camp at Richland gives girls inspiration, opportunities in STEAM fields

Girls to experience more learning, campus life at UT Dallas during second week

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Twenty middle school girls explored science, technology, mathematics, arts and engineering (STEAM) concepts and discovered the joy of learning this week at Richland College.

These Dallas-area 8th grade girls were selected to participate in Girls Inc. SMART Summer College Camp, a two-week learning experience designed by Girls Inc. of Metropolitan Dallas, Richland College and The University of Texas at Dallas – Science and Engineering Education Center (SEEC).

The first week of camp, held June 16-20 at Richland College, focused on “Water: Ubiquitous and Unique.” The girls learned about the various properties of Earth’s most important resource in the contexts of sustainability and ecology. The curriculum included experiential learning activities in the sciences as well as in 3-D art, learning strategies and college readiness skills. Each afternoon, the girls experienced the physics and fun behind the hula hoop.

Sherry Dean, Richland College speech communication professor and Girls Inc. board member, says the week was an amazing success.

“We saw the girls grow a lot,” Dr. Dean says. “It was a very intense learning community. This week sets the stage for thinking routines and helping the girls see connections. The girls created ePortfolios to showcase their experiences. They will be able to look back on this week and realize how they’ve become stronger, smarter and bolder.”

Dr. Dean said another important goal was achieved — introducing the girls to a pathway more and more students take to pursue higher education: the community college experience. Richland has some 20,000 credit students and offers Richland Collegiate High School (RCHS), a dual-credit charter high school.

“We planted important seeds for them,” she says. “The girls really enjoyed being on the campus and we introduced them to RCHS. They were excited to consider options. I believe we had a positive influence on their aspirational goals for higher education.”

Next week, June 22-27, the girls will experience campus life at UT Dallas, living in dorm suites, finding out what it takes to apply for college and participating in learning activities in bioengineering, nanotechnology, forensic science, robotics and space science.

At UT Dallas, the girls also will have the opportunity to connect with science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) professionals from the university and Dallas’ business community. Evenings will be filled with fun activities such as karaoke, Zumba and movies. The week culminates with a field trip to Texas Instruments.

Expanding the horizons of the young women selected to participate is a significant goal of the camp, says Lori Palmer, CEO of Girls Inc. of Metropolitan Dallas.

“Girls Inc. SMART Summer College Camp will awaken the potential in middle school girls as they explore the life of a full-time college student and discover opportunities in STEM fields,” Ms. Palmer says. “We encourage girls to explore STEM fields because research demonstrates that women employed in STEM careers earn an average of 33 percent more than those employed in other fields.”

Bernine Khan, UT Dallas’ SEEC director, says UT Dallas is thrilled to host week two of the camp because while the university is distinguished for its strength in STEM education and research, females make up only about 43 percent of the student body.

“Females, in general, represent a hugely untapped resource of potential STEM professionals in our nation, and when compounded with low socio-economic and cultural issues, the pathway to a successful STEM career is stymied,” Dr. Khan says. “The program introduces these girls to the flavors of STEM careers through interactions with female STEM professionals. If the girls ultimately choose a non-STEM field, it will be an informed choice with the full knowledge that their intrinsic ability had no bearing on their decision.”

Learn more about Girls Inc. of Metropolitan Dallas at www.girlsincdallas.org, Richland College at www.richlandcollege.edu and The University of Texas at Dallas at www.utdallas.edu.


Girls Inc. camp at Richland, UT Dallas to give girls inspiration, opportunities in STEM fields

This summer, Girls Inc. of Metropolitan Dallas is giving middle school girls an amazing opportunity to explore science, technology, mathematics and engineering (STEM) concepts and a pathway to higher education through a partnership with Richland College and The University of Texas at Dallas – Science and Engineering Education Center (SEEC).

The three organizations worked together to develop the Girls Inc. SMART Summer College Camp, a two-week learning experience for 20 Dallas-area girls entering 8th grade, to expand the horizons of the young women selected to participate.

“Girls Inc. SMART Summer College Camp will awaken the potential in middle school girls as they explore the life of a full-time college student and discover opportunities in STEM fields,” says Lori Palmer, CEO of Girls Inc. of Metropolitan Dallas. “We encourage girls to explore STEM fields because research demonstrates that women employed in STEM careers earn an average of 33 percent more than those employed in other fields.”

Bernine Khan, UT Dallas’ SEEC director, says the camp is designed to help girls dream big. The University of Texas at Dallas is ascending the ranks, quickly becoming recognized as one of the top schools by the U.S. News & World Report’s Best Colleges rankings. While the university is distinguished for its strength in STEM education and research, females make up only about 43 percent of the student body.

“Females, in general, represent a hugely untapped resource of potential STEM professionals in our nation, and when compounded with low socio-economic and cultural issues, the pathway to a successful STEM career is stymied,” Dr. Khan says. “The program introduces these girls to the flavors of STEM careers through interactions with female STEM professionals. If the girls ultimately choose a non-STEM field, it will be an informed choice with the full knowledge that their intrinsic ability had no bearing on their decision.”

The first week of the Girls Inc. SMART Summer College Camp, held June 16-20 at Richland College, will focus on “Water: Ubiquitous and Unique.” The girls will explore the various properties of Earth’s most important resource in the contexts of sustainability and ecology. The curriculum includes experiential learning activities in the sciences as well as in 3-D art, learning strategies and college readiness skills. Each afternoon, the girls will learn about the physics and fun behind the hula hoop.

Sherry Dean, Richland College speech communication professor and Girls Inc. board member, says Richland College administrators see the camp as an intentional effort to grow and nurture future female scientists and engineers while introducing the girls to a route more and more students take to pursue higher education – the community college experience. Richland has some 20,000 credit students and offers a dual-credit charter high school.

“Many people do not know that 42 percent of all first-time college freshman in 2013 were enrolled at two-year institutions such as Richland College,” Dr. Dean says. “We anticipate that many Girls Inc. girls will also make Richland an important part of their higher education experience.”

The second week of the Girls Inc. SMART Summer College Camp (June 22-27) will immerse girls in campus life at UT Dallas. The girls will live in university dorm suites, find out what it takes to apply for college and participate in learning activities in bioengineering, nanotechnology, forensic science, robotics and space science.

At UT Dallas, the girls also will have the opportunity to connect with STEM professionals from the university and Dallas’ business community. Evenings will be filled with fun activities such as karaoke, Zumba and movies. The week culminates with a field trip to Texas Instruments.

Learn more about Girls Inc. of Metropolitan Dallas at www.girlsincdallas.org, Richland College at www.richlandcollege.edu and The University of Texas at Dallas at www.utdallas.edu.


Richland College, Missouri S&T sign transfer agreement
MissouriS&T-1

From left: Debra Schatz, Missouri S&T’s assistant director of admissions; Richland College President Kay Eggleston; Martha Hogan, executive dean of Richland College’s School of Engineering, Business and Technology; Richland College Engineering Professor Roderick Crowder sign a transfer agreement on March 19 between the two institutions.

Representatives from Richland College and Missouri University of Science and Technology (Missouri S&T) signed a transfer articulation agreement on March 19 to provide qualifying Richland students complete academic transfer access to Missouri S&T to earn a Bachelor of Arts/Science in engineering.

The signing was conducted by Richland College President Kay Eggleston; Martha Hogan, executive dean of Richland College’s School of Engineering, Business and Technology; Richland College Engineering Professor Roderick Crowder; and Debra Schatz, Missouri S&T’s assistant director of admissions, representing Missouri University S&T Chancellor Cheryl Schrader

A similar signing was held last month at Missouri S&T. Approximately 2,000 of Richland College’s 18,500 students are enrolled in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) fields of study, including 600 students in engineering.

Developing transfer agreements is an important part of Richland College’s mission to encourage student learning success and degree completion. Richland maintains transfer agreements for degrees ranging from journalism to engineering to photography to digital forensics with institutions including the University of Texas at Dallas, Texas A&M University-Commerce, Oklahoma State University Institute of Technology and the University of North Texas.