Tag Archives: Richland Collegiate High School

RCHS to Host Cleaning Supplies Drive Sept. 8 for Rural Texas Town Hit by Hurricane Harvey

Richland Collegiate High School (RCHS) Service Learning students will be hosting a cleaning supplies drive Friday, Sept. 8, to benefit Mont Belvieu, a small, rural community northeast of Houston with 5,000 residents who were impacted by Hurricane Harvey and received 61 inches of rain.

Anyone interested in assisting RCHS with this drive is welcome to bring cleaning supplies between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. to either the east or west circles on the Richland College campus, located at 12800 Abrams Rd. in Dallas. Supplies needed include buckets, hand sanitizer, insect repellant, scrub brushes, cleaning cloths and towels, heavy duty trash bags, protective masks, disposable gloves, work gloves, clotheslines and clothespins.

The cleaning supplies will be delivered to Mont Belvieu on Saturday, Sept. 9. In addition to this drive, the Service Learning students have pledged to reach out and help this small community in a long-term commitment to see the residents through the extended recovery process. RCHS will hold future drives in Nov. and Dec. to collect food items and warm clothing.

For more information about Richland Collegiate High School, visit alt.richlandcollege.edu/rchs.


Richland Collegiate High School Paves the Way for Future S.T.E.M. Graduates with New Engineering Pathway

 

Eleven high school juniors from Richland Collegiate High School (RCHS) recently completed the first course in a new engineering pathway, paving the way not only for the students to get a head start on college-level courses while still in high school, but also for the students to become immediately employable, with some students even achieving a level-one manufacturing certification.

The first class in this new pathway was Drafting 1309, an intensive 13-day class taught by Mohammad-Ali Manouchehripour, Ph.D. In addition to basic drafting, students learned computer-aided design (CAD), a basic foundation of engineering, with the software AutoCAD. In this class, students learned how to draw an object and create a blueprint, and later they will actually be able to manufactur those objects.

“I think AutoCAD is a good software to learn in general because it has such a wide range of uses,” said Mitchell Zadnik, one of the RCHS students enrolled in Drafting 1309. “Our instructor told us some people take the class to make jewelry, some people take it for engineering and some people take it for the general knowledge of it.”

Students in the engineering pathway have access to Richland College’s Technology, Engineering and Advanced Manufacturing (TEAM) Center, a multi-million dollar learning space with leading edge, industry-quality technology that allows engineering and manufacturing students to have contemporary, hands-on learning experiences and career-focused training.

“Our students are going to be designing, developing and manufacturing their own parts and then assembling them into their own robotic assessments at the end of the program,” said Craig Hinkle, RCHS principal. “It is a very unique opportunity in public education for 16-year-old high school students to have access to multi-million dollar labs and manufacturing processes. When they leave here, they’ll be employable in the industry before they’ve even received their college degrees.”

“All of the software students learn in this class and this program can be added to their portfolios,” said Manouchehripour. “When they go to job interviews in two years, they will have experience with the software currently being used in the industry. Here at Richland College, everyone is a team. Our main agenda is to make sure we educate students, and to be a supplier to the demands of the local industries.”

When filling the inaugural drafting class, RCHS looked for students who were interested in math, science and engineering; students who may have already been in robotics clubs at their previous high schools; and students who had previously taken advanced math courses. For the duration of their time at RCHS, the students will work closely with RCHS senior academic advisors to develop a continued pathway based on their future educational and career goals.

Most of the 11 students in the inaugural class have dreams to go into various engineering fields, including but not limited to aerospace, biotechnical, software, manufacturing and mechanical. Other career aspirations include architecture, mathematics, marine biology and security.

In a pathway traditionally dominated by men, administrators were also pleased when the inaugural class had more female students than male students.

“More than 50 percent of the students are female, and we are really excited about that,” said Hinkle. “There has been a trend that math and science fields are dominated by males, and we as an American society have been trying to change that. Right now, we actually have about a 60/40 female-to-male ratio, of which we are proud. We hope that will be an inspiration to other female students in the future.”

Johannah Belk, one female RCHS student, joined this program because it offered more opportunities in engineering than her previous high school did.

“I’ve explored many different fields of engineering, but doing AutoCAD all day, every day in this course made me realize it’s what I want to do every day for the rest of my life, which is pretty exciting,” said Belk. “I’m hoping to design locks and go into security. I think the mechanisms inside locks can be advanced with growing technology, and I want to be a part of that.”

Another female RCHS student, Alaina Crowder, joined the program so she could gain college experience in high school before transferring to a four-year university.

“My dream job is to be a manufacturing engineer,” said Crowder. “After taking this class and being shown around a manufacturing lab, I became super interested in that field. I hope I’ll be able to work in a lab like this one someday.”

Richland Collegiate High School is a school designed to provide a rigorous academic experience for high school juniors and seniors. Students complete their last two years of high school at Richland College by taking college courses and earning college credits. These students can potentially graduate with both their high school diploma and an associate degree, prepared to transfer to a four-year university. Tuition and books are free, making RCHS an educational and affordable choice.

For more information about Richland Collegiate High School, visit alt.richlandcollege.edu/rchs.


Five Richland Collegiate High School Students Named Commended Students in 2017 National Merit Scholarship Program

Craig Hinkle, principal of Richland Collegiate High School, recently announced that Isra Abdulwadood of Garland, Ashley Babjac of McKinney, Stephan Farnsworth of Wylie, Swikriti Paudyal of Plano, and Sunnie Rhodes of Plano, all Richland Collegiate High School (RCHS) students, have been named Commended Students in the 2017 National Merit Scholarship Program. These students join some 34,000 Commended Students throughout the nation who are all being recognized for their exceptional academic promise. Hinkle will present each of these scholastically talented seniors a Letter of Commendation from Richland Collegiate High School and from the National Merit Scholarship Corporation (NMSC).

Commended Students placed among the top five percent of more than 1.6 million students who entered the 2017 National Merit Scholarship Competition by taking the 2015 Preliminary SAT/National Merit Scholarship Qualifying Test (PSAT/NMSQT). Abdulwadood, Babjac, Farnsworth, Paudyal and Rhodes will not continue in the 2017 competition for National Merit Scholarship Awards.

“The young men and women being named Commended Students have demonstrated outstanding potential for academic success,” commented an NMSC spokesperson. “These students represent a valuable national resource; recognizing their accomplishments, as well as the key role these schools play in their academic development, is vital to the advancement of educational excellence in our nation. We hope that this recognition will help broaden their educational opportunities and encourage them as they continue their pursuit of academic success.”

Richland Collegiate High School is a school designed to provide a rigorous academic experience for high school juniors and seniors. Students complete their last two years of high school at Richland College by taking college courses and earning college credits with a focus on mathematics, science and engineering or visual, performing and digital arts. These students can potentially graduate with both their high school diploma and an associate degree, prepared to transfer to a four-year university. Tuition and books are free, making RCHS an educational and affordable choice.

For more information on the Richland Collegiate High School, visit richlandcollege.edu/rchs/


Richland Collegiate High School Student Tracks Asteroid and Conducts Astrophysics Research at University of Colorado
Abbas Zaki poses outside

Abbas Zaki

Richland Collegiate High School (RCHS) student Abbas Zaki recently spent 39 days operating a research-grade telescope, taking images of a near-earth asteroid and writing software to measure its position by precisely calculating its orbital path.

The asteroid, named 2003 LS3, was closely tracked, and based on data collected by Zaki and other students, they were able to determine that the asteroid will not collide with any of the planets in the solar system for the next four million years.

Zaki’s research was done as part of the 58th annual Summer Science Program (SSP) at the University of Colorado at Boulder, and he was one of only 36 gifted science students who came from around the world for this academic challenge, collaboration and personal growth. Together with his student colleagues, Zaki worked closely with university professors; met prominent guest speakers, such as an astronaut and a Nobel Prize physicist; and took behind-the-scenes tours of local scientific, educational and cultural sites, including the National Institute of Standards and Technology and Lockheed Martin. At Lockheed Martin, the students learned about the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter and Gravity Recover and Interior Laboratory mission. The students also visited the control room of the ongoing Juno mission. The NASA space probe Juno was launched in 2010 and reached its destination of Jupiter on July 5.

“The part that I enjoyed most about the program was the opportunity to transcend my financial circumstances and to form friendships with, and learn alongside, brilliant students from all over the world who shared my ambition and desire for knowledge,” said Zaki. “I also thoroughly enjoyed being able to interact with the guest speakers, who were among the best in their fields, and to learn about some of the work they had done.”

Zaki was able to attend SSP through financial support from QuestBridge, a scholarship program that provides high achieving, low-income students with tools necessary to attend some of the best universities in the nation.

“Abbas truly understands the meaning of hard work,” said Richland Collegiate High School Principal Craig Hinkle. “RCHS students enroll in our program to set themselves apart, not just in earned college credits, but in their willingness to reach out beyond expectations. Abbas has quite literally done that. I can’t wait to hear where he lands next!”

The SSP is an independent nonprofit operated in cooperation with the California Institute of Technology, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology and the University of Colorado at Boulder. Since 1959, this highly selective program has offered gifted teens the opportunity to conduct research in a professional setting. Many SSP alumni go on to earn advanced degrees and obtain leadership roles in their chosen careers.

Richland Collegiate High School provides a rigorous academic experience for high school juniors and seniors. Students can complete their last two years of high school at Richland College by taking college courses and earning college credits with a focus on mathematics, science and engineering.

For more information on SSP, visit summerscience.org. For information on RCHS, visit richlandcollege.edu/rchs.


Richland College receives $15k for engineering scholarships
Dr. Stephen Mittelstet (left) and Dr. Kristyn Edney (center) receive a check from Cindy Keiths (right), co-chair of the Tech Titan Awards.

Dr. Stephen Mittelstet (left) and Dr. Kristyn Edney (center) receive a check from Cindy Bond Keith (right), co-chair of the Tech Titan Awards.

Last week, Richland College President, Dr. Stephen Mittelstet, and Richland Collegiate High School of Mathematics, Science, and Engineering (RCHS) Principal, Dr. Kristyn Edney, accepted a $15,000 check from the Metroplex Technology Business Council (MTBC). The check was part of RCHS’ winnings for the Tech Titan of the Future Award (University Level) received last September during the MTBC’s eighth annual awards gala. RCHS was recognized for its inventive approaches to “closing gaps in the K-16 Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) student pipeline in its region’s engineering technology-related workforce.”

Cindi Bond Keith, Tech Titan Awards co-chair, presented the check and had this to say about the award, “Overall what we were looking for were places to go and give money where they are trying to make an impact on the future and to what’s going on in engineering in our own market.”

The Tech Titan of the Future Award was created to recognize innovative programs in higher education that prepare students for future careers in engineering technology-related fields. The $15,000 will go toward scholarships for RCHS engineering students who have not completed their engineering course sequence when they receive their RCHS diploma. Scholarship funds will also be available to other Richland College engineering students.

For more information about this award, contact Anitra Cotton at 972-238-6022. To read other RCHS news, visit the Richland College news and media page.


RCHS named “Tech Titan of the Future” by largest technology trade association in Texas

The Richland Collegiate High School of Mathematics, Science and Engineering (RCHS) at Richland College recently received the “Tech Titan of the Future” Award at the Metroplex Technology Business Council (MTBC) Gala Fri., Sept. 26. The award recognizes higher education institutions that foster and support students to choose careers in engineering and tech-related fields. MTBC, the largest technology trade association in Texas, presented the award to RCHS because of its innovative approach to “closing gaps in the K-16 Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) student pipeline into our region’s engineering technology-related workforce.”

“Three years ago Richland College (RLC) worked with area chambers of commerce, business leaders, public and private schools, home schools, universities, civic leaders, and organizations like MTBC assessing area workforce needs in the engineering and technology fields,” explains Dr. Stephen Mittelstet, RLC president and RCHS superintendent. “In response, RLC applied for and received the first and, to date, the only charter school in Texas held by a community college. RCHS has exceeded our highest expectations and we are thrilled and honored that MTBC has recognized this innovative approach with the 2008 Tech Titan of the Future Award.”

Along with a trophy, RCHS will receive more than $20,000 in scholarships to help those RCHS graduates who haven’t completed their engineering course sequence when they receive their RCHS diploma. Once they graduate from RCHS, their enrollment at Richland College will no longer be tuition-free. Scholarships will also be available to other RLC engineering students.

“Receiving the Tech Titan Award was a thrill for me and the RCHS staff,” says RCHS principal Dr. Kristyn Edney. “There were several quality universities with outstanding programs that were up against us. The award is a true testament to the innovative spirit of both Richland faculty and administration and the incredible accomplishments of the students who choose to attend RCHS.”

Other 2008 finalists included the Institute for Innovations and Entrepreneurship (UTD), the George A. Jeffrey NanoExplorers (NanoTech Institute at UTD) and The Guildhall (SMU). Previous college and university finalists of the Tech Titan of the Future Award include UTD, UNT, UTA, UT Southwestern, SMU, Collin College, and the DCCCD LeCroy Center for Educational Technology. RLC’s articulated engineering associate degree program won the award in 2005, the first year MTBC offered the university-level recognition.

RCHS was created in 2005 as a unique dual-credit charter high school designed to provide a “rigorous academic experience” for up to 200 high school juniors and 200 seniors, housed on the Richland College campus. Students can complete their last two years of high school at Richland by taking college courses and earning college credits with a focus on mathematics, science, and engineering. In the first graduating class last spring, all but seven of the 129 RCHS seniors received their high school diploma and college associate degree simultaneously.

These students transferred this fall as juniors to various in-state and out-of-state colleges and universities, both public and private, with more than $2.5 million in scholarships. RCHS also boasts an “Exemplary” rating from the Texas Education Agency in 2007 and 2008, the only charter high school in Texas to achieve this highest rating for both years.
For more information, contact Anitra Cotton at 972-238-6022 or anitracotton@dcccd.edu. Additional details can be found at www.richlandcollege.edu/rchs.