Tag Archives: higher education

Richland College offering a broad view of healthcare occupations, March 26-29

According to the 2010-11 Edition Occupational Outlook Handbook published by the Bureau of Labor Statistics of the U.S. Department of Labor, of the 20 fastest growing occupations in the economy half are related to healthcare. Additionally, about 26 percent of all new jobs created in this nation will be in the healthcare and social assistance industry, creating 4 million new jobs.

With this growth comes a greater need for training and education in health science fields. Aspiring healthcare workers can receive a broad range of information on the field from working professionals and healthcare educators at the Health Professions Information Days session March 26-29, 2012, at Richland College.

Guests will have the opportunity to explore a broad range of healthcare careers including radiology technology, sonography, occupational therapy, dental hygiene and more. Breakout sessions facilitated by Dallas-area university recruiters and program directors, as well as local doctors. Universities represented will include the University of Texas system, University of North Texas, Texas Christian University, Parker University and others.

To view a detailed schedule of events, click here http://www.richlandcollege.edu/medcareers/InfoDays.pdf.

For more information, please contact Mike Bell at mcbell@dcccd.edu or 972-238-6015.


Richland College Received National Recognition for Community Service, Named to President’s Honor Roll

honorroll_logo_8x8_smallRichland College has been named to the 2009 President’s Higher Education Community Service Honor Roll, the highest federal recognition a college or university can receive for its commitment to volunteering, service-learning and civic engagement.

The Corporation for National and Community Service, which administers the annual Honor Roll award, recognized more than 700 colleges and universities for their impact on issues from poverty and homelessness to environmental justice. On campuses across the country, thousands of students joined their faculty to develop innovative programs and projects to meet local needs using the skills gained in their classrooms. Business students served as consultants to budget-strapped nonprofits and businesses, law students volunteered at legal clinics, and dozens of others organized anti-hunger campaigns.

“Congratulations to Richland College and its students for their dedication to service and commitment to improving their local communities,” said Patrick Corvington, CEO of the Corporation for National and Community Service. “Our nation’s students are a critical part of the equation and vital to our efforts to tackle the most persistent challenges we face. They have achieved impactful results and demonstrated the value of putting knowledge into practice to help renew America through service.”

The Honor Roll includes six colleges and universities that are recognized as Presidential Awardees, with an additional 115 named to the Distinction List and 621 schools named as Honor Roll members. Honorees are chosen based on a series of selection factors including the scope and innovation of service projects, percentage of student participation in service activities, incentives for service, and the extent to which the school offers academic service-learning courses. Click here for a full list of Honor Roll recipients.

College students make a significant contribution to the volunteer sector; in 2009, 3.16 million students performed more than 300 million hours of service, according to the Volunteering in America study released by the Corporation. Each year, the Corporation invests more than $150 million in fostering a culture of service on college campuses through grants awarded by its programs; the education awards that AmeriCorps members receive at the conclusion of their term of service to pay for college; and through support of training, research, recognition, and other initiatives to spur college service.

The Corporation oversees the Honor Roll in collaboration with the Department of Education, the Department of Housing and Urban Development, Campus Compact and the American Council on Education.

For more information, visit http://servicelearning.richlandcollege.edu/.


New Richland College satellite campus to serve as a Gateway to Your Education with DCCCD while being ‘gold’ in energy efficiency

Richland College officially opened its Garland Campus with a ribbon-cutting ceremony today. The new facility, located on the corner of Walnut and Glenbrook, serves as a location for area companies, organizations, and individuals to obtain highly specialized, contract corporate and workforce training and also functions as an educational gateway for student intake and outreach services for area residents and businesses to access main campus college credit programs and courses at Richland, Eastfield, and El Centro colleges.

“We are eager for this first facility on Richland’s new 21-acre Garland campus to serve as a nearby gateway to Garland-area residents to learn more about the many educational opportunities the DCCCD has to offer, especially at the main campuses of Richland, Eastfield, and El Centro Colleges,” said Steve Mittelstet, Richland’s president for the past 30 years.

Innovative, eco-friendly design and construction

VAI Architects provided master planning for this new, state-of-the-art facility. It is the first public project built as part of the master planned redevelopment for downtown Garland. The building was designed to provide a new public plaza link to proposed urban redevelopment and nearby DART rail and bus stations.

It is also the first Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Gold-designed/constructed project in the City of Garland. Developed by the U.S. Green Building Council, LEED is an internationally recognized certification system that measures energy efficiency including energy savings, water efficiency, and CO2 emissions reduction. It is Richland’s intent that the systems and operations of this new building will function in efficient ways that produce minimal impact to the environment while providing lessons to its students and surrounding community on sustainability. It is hoped that the money saved on energy can be reinvested in workforce development instruction, student outreach services, and student learning success. Some of its “green” features include:

-It is located immediately adjacent to the Downtown Garland DART Rail Station to promote the convenient use of public transportation;
-A prominent single-slope roof that harvests rainwater in underground storage tanks for use irrigating all plant materials; its white reflection reduces the sun’s heating effects on the building’s cooling system;
-Motion-sensor faucets and double-flush toilet mechanisms in restrooms conserve water use; waterless urinals in men’s restrooms save up to 20,000 gallons of water per year per fixture; and
-Building construction materials contain low VOC (Volatile Organic Compounds) levels, reducing pollutants and improving indoor air quality for occupants.

g1-copyThe facility is organized into three functional building areas that consist of the main central gallery, a separate administration wing and a classrooms/computer lab wing for training opportunities. Each functional building area is oriented to take advantage of proper solar orientation in accordance with fundamental sustainability design concepts. Exterior and interior finish materials consist primarily of large blocks of split-face native Texas limestone, local brick similar to the main Richland campus, low E insulated glass and metal panels.

Programs offered

Career-related education, training, and services are the focus of the first phase of this new 21-acre campus. Dallas County companies will be able to access training for both new hires and currently employed workers to enhance their skills, which in turn will provide greater opportunities for advancement for individuals and strengthen companies and overall Garland-area economic development.

Currently, the campus is providing a machine operator program in response to a need voiced by the Dallas County Manufacturers’ Association through the Garland Chamber of Commerce. A medical office specialist program is also underway to train skilled, non-clinical support specialists in a medical setting as front office staffing, scheduling clerks, patient coordinators, and individuals to verify insurance. Specific programming will continue to evolve as the needs and demands of the local workforce expand.

Garland Chamber of Commerce and community partnerships

This remote campus also provides a separate lease space for use by the Garland Chamber of Commerce, with its own identifiable entry. This unique arrangement further solidifies Richland’s commitment to partnering with area businesses, particularly with the Garland-area manufacturing industry, to build relationships and stimulate the economy.

“The mission of the Garland Chamber is taking primary responsibility for a sustainable economy in Garland. To that end, a marriage between the Chamber and the Richland College Garland Campus is an ideal fit. This relationship along with the existing partnership of the Garland Independent School District, the City of Garland and the Chamber makes us one of the most competitive communities in the country,” says Garland Chamber of Commerce CEO Paul Mayer.

The 6,000-square-foot, two-story glass gallery space at the Garland Campus links both the Chamber’s lease space and college administration wing to the education wing. The gallery will serve a variety of functions including career fairs, university/college fairs, intercultural festivals, and neighborhood association celebrations.

Mittelstet added, “We look forward to future expansion of our new Garland campus with other potential area partners, such as the Garland Independent School District, to help young students from GISD move successfully into college and on into universities and careers, with lifelong learning opportunities to meet the dynamic demands of a rapidly changing economy and workforce that are requisite in building and maintaining a robust, sustainable community.”

For more information, please contact Anitra Cotton at anitracotton@dcccd.edu or 972-238-6022.