Tag Archives: health professions

vials of vaccines Richland College to Host Annual Health Professions Information Days Mar. 25-28

Richland College will host its annual Health Professions Information Days, an opportunity for students to learn about various health professions careers, Mar. 25-28.

Participants will learn about various health professions careers, including nursing, medicine, dentistry and more. More than 40 guest speakers will be presenting and available to answer questions, including practicing doctors, health occupations advisors and recruiters and more.

Health Professions Information Days will take place on the Richland College campus, located at 12800 Abrams Rd. in Dallas. Sessions will take place in Sabine Hall unless otherwise noted on the schedule. The schedule of events is as follows:

Monday, Mar. 25:
10-11 a.m., room SH118: Russell Canham, M.D., “The Path to Medicine: Getting Accepted into Medical Field of Dreams” Dr. Canham is a cardiologist, practicing in the Methodist Healthcare System of Hospitals.

11:15 a.m.-12:15 p.m., room SH118: Dr. Scott Wright, “The Basics of Admission to Medical or Dental School.” Dr. Wright is the executive director of Texas Medical & Dental Schools Application Service, and he will answer the following questions: What is the timeline for applying and getting admitted to medical or dental school? Who gets admitted? What are their GPAs? Their MCAT or DAT scores?

12:45-2:05 p.m., room SH118: “Transferring into 4 year schools & for future entry into medical, dental and other health professions graduate programs”
Health occupations advisors:
University of Texas at Dallas – Dr. Karen De Olivares, Director of Health Professions Advising
University of North Texas – Dr. Debrah Beck, Health Professions Director
Dallas Baptist University – Dr. Curtis Lee, Professor of Biology & HP Advisor
SMU – Pamela McNulty, MS, MT(ASCP), Director, Office of Pre-Health Advising

Tuesday, Mar. 26:
11 a.m.-12:20 p.m., room SH118: “Focus on Careers in Nursing”
Associate degree in nursing (A.D.N.):
Brookhaven College – Dr. Mark Meyer, Dean of Nursing, Brookhaven College
Collin College – Cathleen Rangel, Nursing Retention Recruiter

Bachelor of Science degree in nursing (B.S.N)
Texas Women’s University – Rekha Nair, Academic Adviser for Nursing
U.T. Tyler – Kleanthe Caruso, R.N., nursing faculty
U.T. Arlington – Courtney Jackson, Academic Advisor for nursing Baylor University (Dallas) – Elaine Lark, Coordinator of Recruitment and Enrollment

12:30-2 p.m., room SH118: Kassidy James, M.P.A.S, Assistant Professor in Physician Assistant Studies, and Veronica Coleman, M.P.A.S, PA-C, Assoc. Clinical Coordinator/Admissions Co-Chair UT Southwestern School of Health Professions, ”Being an Outstanding Applicant in Competitive Health Professions Programs.” How you present yourself in an interview or in a personal essay might affect your chances of getting into a program. Learn how to compete with other applicants effectively.

2:15-3:15 p.m., room SH118: Medical, Osteopathic and Dental Schools Panel
UT Southwestern Medical School – Leah Schouten, Associate Director of Student Recruitment Services
UNT/College of Osteopathic Medicine – Dr. Mike Kennedy, Director of Admissions
Texas A & M College of Dentistry – Dr. Barbara Miller, Executive Director & Assoc. Professor
Texas A & M Health Science Center, College of Medicine – Filo Maldonado, Assistant Professor and Assoc. Dean of Admissions, Texas A&M Health Science Center Medical School
UNT Health Science Center – Dr. Patricia A. Gwirtz, Associate Dean & Professor, Graduate School of Biomedical Science

5:40-7 p.m., room SH118: Dr. Eddie Mercado, Pharm. D., “The World of Pharmacy–Choices in Occupations.” Dr. Mercado is a clinical pharmacist at Children’s Hospital in the emergency department.

Wednesday, Mar. 27:
10-11:15 a.m., room SH117: Panel: The Diversity of Health Professions
Prosthetics & Orthotics – Miguel Mojica, C.P.O., L.P.O., UT Southwestern Medical Center
Intra-operative Neuromonitoring – Laura Parsons, B.S., C.N.I.M., Director of Corporate Strategy and Business Development for Texas Intra-operative Monitoring, Inc.
Public Health – Beth Hargrove, Director of Admissions, UNT Health Science Center
Respiratory Therapy – Jennifer De la Garza, RRT, Clinical Coordinator, El Centro College

10-11:15 a.m., Crocket Hall, room C110: Clinical Nutrition & Dental Hygiene
UT Southwestern – Lona Sandon, Director of the Master of Clinical Nutrition Coordinated Program, Assistant Professor in Dietetics
Texas A&M Health Science Center College of Dentistry – Leigh Ann Wyatt, BSDH, MA, MS, Clinical Associate Professor, Program Director

10-11:15 a.m., SH118: Physician Assistant Vic Holmes, MPAS, CPC, PA-C, UNT Health Science Center, instructor in PA Studies program

11:15 a.m.-12:30 p.m.: Student Panel Discussion: Students and graduates from various health professions programs in the DFW area will talk about their respective occupational fields.

12:45-2 p.m., room SH117: Panel: The Diversity of Health Professions
Emergency Medical Tech/Paramedic – David Diaz, EMT-Paramedic, Dallas Fire-Rescue
Clinical Lab Sciences – Dr. LeAnn Hutson, MLS (ASCP), Asst. Professor & Director of Medical Laboratory Sciences, Tarleton state University
Nurse midwifery – Jennifer Woo, PhD, CNM, WHNP, Clinical Assistant Professor in the Louise Harrington School of Nursing, Baylor Nurse Midwifery Program

12:45-2 p.m., Crockett Hall, room C110: Occupational therapy and Physical Therapy
UT Southwestern – Dr. Beth Deschenes, PT, DPT, OCS, Vice-Chair/Head of Admissions Committee
Mountainview College – Dr. Candice Freeman, OTD, MOT, OTR, Director of Occupational Therapy Assistant Program

12:45-2 p.m., room SH118: Imaging Technology Fields
Brookhaven College, Radiologic Technology – Sharon Watson, R.T., faculty
UT Southwestern Medical Center, Radiation Therapy – DeAnn Klein, faculty
El Centro College, Sonography – Pam Crawford, RDMS, RT, Clinical Coordinator/Faculty El Centro College – Joan A. Becker, ARRT(R)(MR), MRI Program Coordinator/Faculty

Thursday, Mar. 28:
9:30-10:50 a.m., room SH117: Samer Ismail, “Standardized Tests for the Health Professions” (PCAT, MCAT, GRE, DAT, OAT, NCLEX). Ismail is a Kaplan presenter and content developer for MCAT 2015.

11 a.m.-12:30 p.m., room SH117: Pharmacy
UNT College of Pharmacy – Casandra Castillo Luna, Recruitment/Admissions Pharmacy School
UT Tyler – Jenny Engel Nelson, Graduate Program Representative for College of Pharmacy
Texas Tech Univ. Health Science Center – Sara Innis, Assistant. Director of Recruitment. School of Pharmacy
Richland Pharmacy Technician Program – Tiffani Neubal Johnson, Director of College Programs in Allied Health

For more information, call 972-238-6248.


The anatomage table is shown with the image of a male figure on his back on the display. Richland College ‘Anatomage Table’ Helping Students Learn Anatomy Digitally

Science and technology have merged in the anatomy and physiology classes at Richland College, and health professions students are taking advantage of the opportunity to perform digital dissections on an Anatomage Table.

The Anatomage Table is a 6-foot-long 3-D visualization tool that is fully interactive and features the most accurate human anatomy and patient data of any technology currently available. Its touch-screen display allows students to use a finger like a scalpel to make an “incision” anywhere on the “cadaver” to examine its physiological structures. To create realistic images, CT and MRI scans were taken every few millimeters on four cadavers, two men and two women, whose bodies had been donated for this project.

“The Anatomage Table is great for identification of bones, muscle, blood vessels and more,” said Jackie Reynolds, professor of biology at Richland College. “It also shows spatial relationships among organs. In addition, it is great for case studies because it allows students to see the MRI or CT scan and the 3-D image that has been produced from the scans side by side.”

Richland College students have been using the table in classes for approximately two years, and Reynolds has already received many positive responses to the machine from students, many who can see the real-life value of learning on the table.

Kassandra Agundizandmy has been working with the Anatomage Table for two semesters and has found it a useful tool as she prepares for a nursing degree.

“The Anatomage Table has been beneficial for me as the 3-D images with different views give me a better understanding of the anatomy of the human body,” said Agundizandmy. “This table has helped prepare me for my future, as it allows me to view positions of organs, vessels bones and more. My most memorable experience was when we did a case study about a man who was shot in the head and were able to learn about him through the Anatomage Table. I felt like I was a real forensic pathologist examining the skull of the man.”

Experiences like Agundizandmy’s showcase the value of offering digital dissection as an option to health professions students because it allows them to learn about unique conditions or abnormal structures that may not be available on standard cadavers. It also allows students instantly to compare the abnormalities to a normal example.

“Students really enjoy using the Anatomage table,” said Reynolds. “We don’t have real cadavers in a classroom, but this is as close as you can get. It makes studying anatomy and physiology more fun. Having this machine makes Richland College more advanced than some four-year universities in the area that don’t have the same technology as we do.”

Mildred Garcia is also pursuing a nursing degree and has worked with the Anatomage Table for two semesters. “I really find the Anatomage Table beneficial,” Garcia said. “We get to see an entire body from skin to blood vessels, bones and organs. I think it’s a great for everyone to use, especially visual learners.”

The Anatomage Table provides a multi-faceted learning experience for students with a variety of tools allowing users to visualize structures of the body. The virtual cadaver can be peeled back in layers for users to learn about muscles, organs and bones, or students can study individual systems such as the cardiovascular or nervous systems. The cadaver can be viewed and worked on from any angle, such as on its back or sitting up, to simulate potential positions a patient may be in. Specific body parts can be highlighted or removed from view, and more than 1,400 pathology images are also available on the table for students to examine. By allowing students also to revert to a previous view of the structure, layer or system on which they are working, it also gives students the chance to approach their learning from an angle of discovery and curiosity without the threat of costly mistakes such as an accidental cut.

As part of the setup for the Anatomage Table at Richland College, a double screen was added to the wall of the anatomy and physiology lab classroom to ensure that all students in a class would be able to view the work being done by peers at the table.

Anatomage is a medical device company that has been developing creative, leading-edge products for the medical and dental industries since 2004. For more information about the Anatomage table, visit anatomage.com. For more information about the health professions programs at Richland College, visit richlandcollege.edu/cd/instruct-divisions/rlc/mshp/hp/pages/default.aspx.


Richland College Offers Emergency Medical Technician Classes for Summer

Close up of EMT uniformRichland College will be offering a summer session of its recently launched Emergency Medical Technician (EMT) program, further expanding the college’s health professions programs.

The summer session will run from June 30 to Aug. 29, with classes taking place Tuesday and Thursday evenings in addition to Saturdays. Funds are also available from the Texas Public Education Grant (TPEG) to assist EMT students with financial aid.

EMT students at Richland College participate in ambulance ride-alongs, a rotation with the fire department and a shift in an emergency room at an affiliated hospital as part of their career preparation.

“The clinical internship is one of the most intense learning aspects of the program,” said Lisa Smithart, Richland College’s medical programs coordinator. “This is where critical thinking really comes into play.”

Students who complete the EMT program are able to take the National Registry of Emergency Medical Technicians certification exam. Those who pass may immediately start their career on ambulances or as patient care technicians in a hospital setting, or they may use it as a pathway to earning their EMT certificate through the Texas Department of Health and Safety Service that will allow them to use their certification anywhere in the United States, pursue a paramedic certificate or even earning a firefighter diploma.

“Anyone interested in a career in medicine that requires prior experience to apply should consider this short pathway to gaining that experience,” said Robert Sherard, Richland College EMT instructor. “The EMTs see a wide variety of medical and traumatic emergencies, during which critical thinking and rapid treatment can literally save lives. Without the actions of these healthcare professionals, many patients would not make it to the hospital.”

Interested students must be 18 years of age and be current with their immunizations, valid CPR card and health insurance. Students must also possess a high school diploma or GED and be eligible to work in the U.S. To receive TPEG funds, a student must be a Texas resident, show financial need and register for the Selective Service.

For more information on Richland College’s EMT program, visit http://bit.ly/1FQBUNU. Students interested in the EMT program who would like more information about TPEG funds should contact Richland College’s financial aid office at 972-587-2599.


Richland College Offers New Emergency Medical Technician Program

Richland College is launching a new Emergency Medical Technician (EMT) program, expanding the college’s health professions programs.

The first EMT session begins April 14, and each session will last three months. The sessions will be offered twice per semester.

Students who complete the EMT program may immediately start their career, or they may use it as a pathway to earning their state EMT certificate that will allow them to use their certification anywhere in the United States, pursue a paramedic certificate or even earning a firefighter diploma.

“EMTs are the first responders in any emergency,” said Lisa Smithart, Richland College’s medical programs coordinator. “They see interesting situations and assist firefighters, paramedics and even physicians when needed.”

Interested students must be 18 years of age and be current with their immunizations, valid CPR card and health insurance. Students must also possess a high school diploma or GED and be eligible to work in the U.S.

For more information on Richland College’s EMT program, visit www.richlandcollege.edu/hp.