Tag Archives: Dallas County Community College District

Richland College Students Win 2019 EarthX Most Environmental Impact Award

Richland College dual credit high school students Samuel Flanagan and Paige Smith helped the Dallas County Community College District win the Division III Most Environmental Impact Award at the EarthX conference, held at Fair Park April 26-28, with their unique project that was part of DCCCD’s “Sustainable U” exhibit.

The Most Environmental Impact Award is given to a group with an outstanding presentation that inspires others to adopt a more sustainable lifestyle. Flanagan and Smith’s project was a boat made entirely out of plastic water bottles. During one month, the students collected a total of five hundred used water bottles from two families of four. Flanagan and Smith then designed and built a boat that holds a capacity of three hundred pounds and floats on water, which they tested by paddling out on White Rock Lake. The project took them one year to complete.

“Samuel and Paige were motivated by their passion to bring environmental awareness and consciousness to our community about how much bottled water we consume and the impact of these bottles, not only on our landfills, but also in our oceans,” said Sonia Ford, Sustainability Project Coordinator at Richland College.

The water bottle boat was very popular among the patrons of EarthX, including elementary school students, seniors, alumni, environmental groups, EarthX judges and DCCCD students. There were also many Richland College representatives at this event, including faculty members Tara Urbanski, Daniella Pezzo, Tiffany Savage and Michael Li; staff members Ford and Cindy Hood, and 35 student volunteers.

“In addition to fulfilling Richland College’s vision to learn, teach and build sustainable local and world community, this project also exemplified Richland’s culture of creativity, innovation, competitiveness and leadership,” added Ford.

All other DCCCD colleges attended EarthX to promote DCCCD’s 17 United Nations Sustainable Development Goals. Read more about these goals and how they can be used to achieve a better and more sustainable future for everyone at www.dcccd.edu/au/sustainability/initiatives/un-sdgs/pages/default.aspx.

EarthX is an international nonprofit organization whose purpose is to educate and inspire people to action toward a more sustainable future. It hosts the world’s largest environmental expo and conference sharing the latest initiatives, discoveries, research, innovations, policies and corporate practices that are reshaping the world. Learn more at https://earthx.org.

Richland College has tracked energy consumption since 1975, and it records and assesses key performance indicators for energy and water usage and recycling.  In 2017, Richland College became the first and only educational institution to be awarded the City of Dallas Zero Waste Management Gold Level Green Business certification for its efforts in preventing waste, incorporating recycling and promoting reuse and compost in its operations. In 2010 and 2011, Richland College was awarded the Environmental Protection Agency WasteWise Award for University and College Partner of the Year. Richland College also won the national Recyclemania Grand Championship in 2016 and the Texas Grand Championship each year from 2010 to 2018. For more information about Richland College’s green initiatives, visit www.richlandcollege.edu/greenrichland.


Colin Allred and Richland President Kay Eggleston pose together. Rep. Colin Allred Speaks at Richland College TRIO Student Support Services Ceremony

Richland College TRIO Student Support Services honored six students as TRIO Achievers at the 2019 TRIO Day Student Success Celebration, attended by Rep. Colin Allred (TX-32), Apr. 24. The students honored were Whitney Boyer, Nick Gjonaj, Felicia Keto, Christian Lara, Cedrick Munongo and Brytha Nkrumah.

“The federal TRIO programs are a set of educational opportunity programs established in 1964 that enable either first-generation-to-college or low-income students and underrepresented special needs populations to earn college degrees,” said Kathryn K. Eggleston, Richland College president. “The Richland College TRIO Student Support Services program is a component of the federal TRIO programs.”

At the event, Rep. Allred addressed the students and other guests, praising the accomplishments of the TRIO Achievers and encouraging the students not to give up on their version of the American dream.

“I want to congratulate the students here at Richland College, and the families who supported them, who succeeded in part because of this wonderful TRIO program,” said Rep. Allred. “This program, and really the charge of Richland College generally, provides opportunities for so many students throughout north Texas.”

Following Rep. Allred’s remarks, students Keto, Lara, Munongo and Nkrumah each told their personal stories of hardship and ultimate success in a TED Talks-style format. Keto, Munongo and Nkrumah are immigrants to the U.S. and outlined the paths they took not just to arrive in the U.S., but to succeed at Richland College. Lara, a first generation American, shared his story of his troubled past, showing a determination not only to succeed, but thrive.

“Success is the biggest thing that we should strive for, and we should never let anyone take that away from us,” Lara said. “The only person that can stop us is ourselves.”

The presentation, recorded by Richland Student Media, is available in its entirety at www.richlandstudentmedia.com/videos/trio.

TRIO programs assist students in overcoming the obstacles they face as the first generation in their families to attend and graduate from a college or university. Today, an estimated 5 million students have graduated from college with the support and assistance of TRIO programs across the country. For more information about TRIO programs, visit www.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ope/trio/index.html.

Since 1993, The TRIO-SSS program at Richland College has assisted eligible students in achieving their academic pursuits by offering several customized academic components designed to increase college retention and graduation rates. These free services include academic advisement, tutoring, assistance in financial aid application, university field trips, college success workshops and cultural enrichment opportunities. For more information, visit www.richlandcollege.edu/sss.


Illustration of locks that appear digital in nature Info Session for Cyber Security Bachelor’s Degree Partnership with NEC, Apr. 30

Richland College and New England College recently partnered to offer an easy transition for Richland students interested in earning a bachelor’s degree in cyber security. Students can transfer their A.A.S. in Cyber Security from Richland College to a bachelor’s degree from NEC without having to leave Richland College.

Interested students can learn more about this partnership at an information session from 4-6 p.m. Tuesday, Apr. 30, in Sabine Hall, room SH117.

This unique partnership will allow students to get into a bachelor’s degree program by continuing to take classes on the Richland College campus. NEC faculty will teach bachelor-level courses on-site at Richland, and NEC will accept all 60 credits students earned in their Dallas County Community College District associate degrees. Additionally, there is a potential for transferring up to 30 more credits through additional coursework or prior learning assessments.

This hybrid program is designed for busy schedules and will only meet at Richland College one night per week. More information about this program is available here.

For additional information about Richland College’s cyber security program, click here.

Richland College is located at 12800 Abrams Rd. in Dallas. A map of Richland College is available here. Sabine Hall is most easily accessible by taking the Abrams Rd. entrance of Richland College and parking in lots A, B, C or D.


a shot of the Richland College library Registration Now Open for Summer and Fall 2019

Register now for Maymester, Summer and Fall 2019!

Registration is now open for all current and incoming Richland College students!

Click here for information on applying to Richland College.
Click here for information on registering for classes.
Click here for the browsable class schedule.
Click here for information about registration for Continuing Education classes.

Don’t forget Richland College also offers online classes and eight-week flex term classes with start dates throughout the fall semester!

2019 Term Dates:
Maymester: May 17 – June 5
Summer I: June 6 – July 3
Summer II: July 8 – Aug. 8
Fall: Aug. 26 – Dec. 12

Questions? Contact the Richland College Admissions Office at 972-238-6948.


Amazon Web Services logo Richland College Offering Amazon Web Services Classes for Summer and Fall 2019

Richland College is offering multiple sections of the Amazon Web Services Academy Solutions Architect class during summer and fall 2019. These AWS curriculum courses are designed to prepare students for the AWS Certified Solutions Architect Associate certification exam.

For students who need flexible class scheduling, online and evening courses are being offered, in addition to daytime courses.

The classes being offered are as follows:

Summer 2019:
May 20 – July 3 — 12:30-4:15 p.m. Mon.-Thur.
May 20 – Aug. 7 — 5:45-9:20 p.m. Mon. and Wed.
May 20 – Aug. 8 — Online Course

Fall 2019:
Aug. 26 – Oct. 16 — 1:00-3:45 p.m. Mon.-Thur.
Aug. 26 – Dec. 12 — 5:45-8:40 p.m. Mon. and Wed.
Sept. 9 – Nov. 27 — Online Course
Oct. 22 – Dec. 12 — 1:00-3:45 p.m. Mon.-Thur.

In these classes, students will develop technical expertise in cloud computing and will have access to course manuals, online knowledge assessments, a free practice certification exam and a discount voucher for the actual certification exam.

With AWS being the industry leader in cloud computing, AWS certification holders are extremely relevant and valued in the IT job market. According to the Global Knowledge 2018 IT Skills and Salary Survey, the average salary of AWS-certified professionals is 29 percent higher than average certified staff.

For information on registering for these classes at Richland College, contact Kaylin Ortiz at 972-238-6069.


A circle with red and white stripes on the bottom half. The top half is blue with the word "vote" in white. Early Voting at Richland College and Richland College Garland Campus

Exercise your right to vote! Richland College and Richland College Garland Campus are early voting locations for Dallas County residents through Apr. 30, 2019.

Early voting at Richland College is on the main floor of Guadalupe Hall.

Hours for both locations are as follows:
Now-Apr. 27 – 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Apr. 28 – 1 to 6 p.m.
Apr. 29-30 – 7 a.m. to 7 p.m.

For additional information about early voting in Dallas County, including other early voting locations, click here.

Richland College is located at 12800 Abrams Rd. in Dallas.
Richland College Garland Campus is located at 675 W. Walnut St. in Garland.


Four of the five Wall of Honor winners (Kirubel Moges not pictured) pose with picture frames containing their headshots and biographies. Richland Honors Five Former and Current Students at 2019 Wall of Honor Ceremony

Congratulations to the 2019 Student Wall of Honor honorees! For more information on the Richland College Student Wall of Honor, click here.

Hope Anderson

When Hope Anderson began her educational journey as a dual credit student at Richland College when she was 16-years-old, no one knew just how far she would go. Hope’s journey is a testament to the power of purpose and planning.

As one of five siblings attending Richland College, Hope was responsible for her own higher education expenses. Undaunted by this challenge, Hope got a part-time job and created an aggressive four-year university transfer strategy.

By the time Hope completed 40 hours at Richland College, she not only was a member of Phi Theta Kappa and named to the President’s Honor Roll, but she also had a number of scholarship offers from top universities. Having an interest in human rights and wanting to stay near her family, she selected Southern Methodist University.

Hope graduated from SMU in 2017 with a 3.97 GPA and three undergraduate degrees: a B.A. in Human Rights with distinction, a B.A. in History, a B.S. in Sociology and a minor in Spanish. During her four years of study at SMU, Hope earned more than $150,000 in scholarships. Some of Hope’s many accomplishments include, but are not limited to, being a John Lewis Fellow, a Fulbright semi-finalist, a 2017 recipient of the SMU “M” Award, a Humanity in Action finalist and a member of both Phi Beta Kappa and the Dedman College Scholar University Honors Program.

In addition to her educational accolades, Hope’s human rights travels have taken her to countries including Nepal, Jordan and Chile. She served as a student leader for the Death Row Facilities in the American South program and interned with the International Rescue Committee of Dallas and the International Justice Mission in Washington, D.C.

In 2018, Hope became the community outreach coordinator for SMU’s Embrey Human Rights Program, and this fall she will begin her graduate studies in the field of human rights.

 

Kirubel Moges

As a student in Richland College’s Honors Program, Kirubel Moges has been described as “fearless in his pursuit of knowledge and academic enrichment.” Instead of protecting his GPA and playing it safe, Kirubel has enrolled in honors courses in a variety of disciplines.

Kirubel grew up in Ethiopia, and when he was three-years-old his father passed away, leaving his mother to care for her three sons. The family moved into a smaller house on their property and rented out the larger main house, and it was from this rental income that the family survived.

Always having the courage to dream big, Kirubel graduated from high school in Ethiopia in 2016 and was excited to attend Richland College that fall. However, political instability in Ethiopia forced him to delay traveling for six months. He got to the U.S. just in time—his travel window to the U.S. expired only one day after he arrived in early 2017. Once on campus, Kirubel threw himself into his studies and did more than excel: he thrived.

In addition to presenting at the 2018 Richland College Honors Conference and the 2018 DCCCD Philosophy Conference, Kirubel presented research on the death penalty in the U.S. at the 2018 Great Plains Honors Council Conference, and he also became the first Richland College Honors Program student to have a poster presentation accepted at the national level by the National Collegiate Honors Council’s 2018 Conference. There, Kirubel’s presentation expanded on his previous research, utilizing computer programming and philosophy to examine interviews as a data set to find which word was most commonly said by death row inmates in their final interviews. Kirubel found the most common word was “love.”

Kirubel is also active in a variety of campus organizations, including Phi Theta Kappa, the National Society of Collegiate Scholars, the Male Achievement Program, the Philosophy Club, the Computer Club and more. He is on track to earn the Richland Honors Scholar designation when he graduates this May, the highest designation possible through the Richland College Honors Program.

 

Adeeba Muntazer

Adeeba Muntazer has a true joy for learning, and at one time in her life she risked literally everything in pursuit of an education.

Growing up in Afghanistan, Adeeba was just nine-years-old when the Taliban gained control of nearly 90 percent of the country and adopted brutal policies that forbade women from receiving an education. People who were found violating these laws were sentenced to death. Despite this risk, many female teachers who had been dismissed from their jobs rebelled and opened secretive, underground schools for girls.

As a teacher himself, Adeeba’s father knew of some of these covert schools, and he understood the value of his daughter receiving an education. At the risk of being killed for facilitating her learning, her father enrolled Adeeba in a secret school. Every day for three years, Adeeba walked jagged roads, sometimes crawling and hiding to evade authorities, to attend the facility her teachers had made into a school. She and other girls gathered in the small, dim and dank room to learn and support each other, and it was here that Adeeba completed her 5th, 6th and 7th grades.

In 2007, when Adeeba turned 18, she honored her parents’ traditions and culture with an arranged marriage, and Adeeba was accepted to study at Kabul University the same year. She balanced her studies with motherhood and caring for a large extended family. In 2009, Adeeba and her family were provided with an opportunity to immigrate to the U.S. because of her husband’s employment with the U.S. Armed Forces in Afghanistan.

Adeeba put her education on hold when she and her family moved, but in 2015 she resumed her dream and enrolled in her first ESOL class at Richland College. Since then, she has become fluent in English and has completed 58 credit hours, maintaining a 3.5 GPA. In the spring of 2018, she even earned the highest grade of her Speech 1311 class with Dr. Sherry Dean Rovelo. Adeeba has plans to soon transfer to El Centro College or Brookhaven College to complete a degree in nursing.

 

Thao Nguyen

Thao Nguyen didn’t mean to follow in her mother’s footsteps and become a nurse. But when she grew to love science through her professors at Richland College, she changed her mind, and she has been using her profession to help other people ever since.

Thao was 17-months-old when she and her parents escaped the Communist regime in Vietnam on a small fishing boat with 72 other people. The trip was harrowing and included a pirate attack in the South China Sea before they were rescued by a U.S. Navy ship. The family ended up at refugee camps in Thailand and the Philippines before moving to the U.S. Once there, Thao’s parents worked hard, and Thao’s mother graduated with an associate’s degree in nursing in 1988.

Inspired by the tenacity of her parents, Thao enrolled at Richland College before transferring to Texas Woman’s University, graduating in 2004. In addition, she was awarded for having the most community service volunteer hours and was the first in her family to earn a bachelor’s degree.

After graduation, Thao became a registered nurse with Texas Health Dallas and won multiple awards and honors, including making the 2012 Great 100 Nurses list and earning the D Magazine Nursing Excellence Award in 2013. But even though Thao has a passion for nursing, she also has a passion for helping others. Thao enrolled at Christ for the Nations Institute in 2016 as a full-time student and will graduate in 2019 with a bachelor’s degree in practical ministry with a major in creative media.

Some of Thao’s humanitarian efforts include partnering with World Relief to aid Afghan refugees in Dallas and creating ArtBark, a dog-friendly event that raises money for local nonprofits. She has also taken eight mission trips since 2012 to provide health care and take family photographs that were often a family’s first photo ever. Thao also volunteers her time to photograph babies in the NICU, documenting holidays and special occasions or taking bereavement photos to capture a baby’s final moments with his or her parents.

 

Steve Rodgers

During his tour of duty in the Vietnam War with the U.S. Air Force, Steve Rodgers found himself facing a choice when feeling overcome with emotional and physical hardships: He could focus on the bad in the world, or he could become the good and help those who suffered. He chose the latter, and his first act was teaching English to Vietnamese citizens.

Upon returning to Dallas, Steve began raising funds and promoting business investment within the Asian community. He has been instrumental in encouraging young people of Asian origin to pursue an education, even helping some of them finance their studies at Richland College.

Some of Steve’s other humanitarian contributions include: working with young addicts at the Palmer Drug Abuse Program; serving lunch at the Stewpot Ministry at the First Presbyterian Church in downtown Dallas; cofounding Restart, a program that assisted homeless and unemployed individuals affected by the recession of the 1980s; volunteering with the Eritrean refugee community in Dallas through organizing and furnishing a community center that offered services including ESL courses, job placement and legal assistance; cofounding the Dick Granger Society to help individuals and families needing assistance with housing, job placement and other necessities; and currently participating in the planning for a retreat center for battered women and children in Belize.

Steve has a degree in international trade from Texas Tech, an MBA from the University of Texas and took French classes at Richland College. Steve has used these educational pursuits to further his global service. During a dangerous mission to develop a camp in Algeria in 1996, Steve hit upon the idea of drilling for water instead of oil in impoverished areas.

Steve learned about digging and repairing wells from Living Water International. Since then, Steve has channeled his oil drilling expertise to provide potable water and teach pump repair and replacement at more than 20 sites in Ethiopia, Uganda, Haiti, Honduras, Guatemala and Belize.


a shot of the Richland College library Richland College to Host Literary Festival and Intercultural Festival

Celebrate outstanding literary works and cultural diversity at the two festivals Richland College is hosting: The Literary Festival April 9-11 and the Intercultural Festival April 10. These free events are open to all faculty, staff, students and the community.

The 36th Annual Richland College Literary Festival will be held in the Lago Vista Gallery of the Richland College Library. This festival introduces students and the community to local talent and the DFW literary scene through distinguished authors, panel discussions, student and faculty readings and related activities.

This year’s theme, “Go Local!”, celebrates Texas artists and local literary forces. The exceptional line-up of speakers includes:

Tuesday, Apr. 9:

  • 11 a.m.-12:20 p.m.: Octavio Solis – Author of more than 20 plays, who is considered one of the most prominent Latino playwrights in America. His latest is the acclaimed book, “Retablos: Stories from a Life Lived Along the Border.”
  • 12:30-1:50 p.m.: Michael Federico – playwright/author of “The Manufactured Myth of Evelyn Flynn” and “On the Eve,” which achieved great success and were produced in New York, San Diego and other locations.

Wednesday, Apr. 10:

  • 10:10-11:05 a.m.: Sandy Petersen – Game designer famous for a board game titled “Cthulhu Wars,” based on the mythos of H.P. Lovecraft.
  • 11:15 a.m.-12:10 p.m.: CARVE Magazine – Cameron Maynard, Joe Milazzo and Mag Gabbert of CARVE Magazine – Panel presentation and readings by published authors.
  • 12:20-1:15 p.m.: Kim Horner – Dallas Morning News former social service reporter and current author of “Probably Someday Cancer,” Mayborn Literary Nonfiction Series.

Thursday, Apr. 11:

  • 11 a.m.-12:20 p.m.: Joe Stanco Faculty Readings – original works read by Richland faculty.
  • 12:30-1:50 p.m.: Student Readings – students read their creative work.

In addition, the Intercultural Festival will be held in the east breezeway from 10:30 a.m.-2 p.m. April 10. The Intercultural Festival is a celebration of the rich cultural diversity at Richland College! Attendees are invited to sign up for the showcase to model clothing from countries all around the world, sing native songs, play an instrument or perform a dance routine from their home countries. Everyone else can watch the showcase to learn about other cultures while eating delicious food, including Mexican-inspired treats.

Richland College is located at 12800 E. Abrams Rd. in Dallas.


An illustration of a hand putting a ballot into a voting box Dallas Mayoral Forum Recording Available from Richland Student Media

Richland Student Media, in partnership with the League of Women Voters and the North Dallas Chamber of Commerce, recorded an Apr. 3 Dallas mayoral forum for the joint goal of giving students a learning experience while also providing a community service by educating voters.

The Apr. 3 mayoral forum was moderated by Ron Chapman, former district, state and appellate court judge. The forum took place in the Scottish Rite Hospital auditorium.

View the forum in its entirely by clicking here. The Dallas mayoral election will be Saturday, May 4.


Two dancers perform ballet on a dark stage. Richland College Dance Program Presents ‘Illumination’ Spring Dance Concert

What makes you shine? Together with guest choreographers and dancers, the Richland College dance program is asking that question and will be celebrating the collective, vibrant glow of our unique inner lights during its spring concert, “Illumination,” with performances at 12:30 and 7:30 p.m. April 5.

“Illumination” will feature student dancers and professional guest performances and choreography in the dance genres of contemporary modern, jazz, tap and hip-hop, and it is directed by Richland College dance director Gina Sawyer. When work began on this performance, Sawyer invited the dancers and choreographers to imagine and create pieces that reflected his or her own individual take on the subject, and the theme began to evolve and take shape into the idea of hope and light in a world of individuality.

“Our theme of ‘illumination’ is about the individual light that each one of us carries and contributes to the world,” said Cheryl Callon, dance faculty member at Richland College. “That light is important, even among the billions of other lights on our planet.”

Dance choreography and film work will include original pieces by Callon, Cooper Delgado, Lauren Schieffer-Holley and guest choreographer Laura Pearson. Featured guest performers include Dark Circles Dance Company, directed by Joshua L. Peugh, and Choreo Records Tap Company, directed by Keira Leverton.

A dancer, teacher and choreographer, Pearson trained at the Texas Ballet Theater School, attending numerous summer intensives with companies such as Hubbard Street Dance Chicago, Texas Ballet Theater and Dallas Black Dance Theater. Her professional dance credits include Ballet Dallas, Dallas Neo-Classical Ballet, Bruce Wood Dance Project, a tour of China with Art.if.Act Dance Project, 6 O’clock Dance Theatre, Zion Dance Project and Wanderlust Dance Project.

Dark Circles Contemporary Dance was founded in 2010 in Seoul, South Korea. The company’s Dallas branch is led by Peugh, an international award-winning choreographer and one of Dance Magazine’s “25 to Watch.” Dark Circles has been hailed by the Ft. Worth Star-Telegram as “the area’s most exciting dance company” and awarded “Best Dance Company” by D Magazine and the Dallas Observer. Since its inception, the company has performed both nationally and internationally.

Leverton comes from a dance background—her grandfather was Buster Cooper, an influential tap dancer who founded the dance program at the Hockaday School. Much of her exposure to the tap community was through tap festivals such as the Chicago Human Rhythm Project and the Third Coast Rhythm Project, and she trained with a variety of professionals, including Gregory Hines and Yuji Uragami. Leverton has performed worldwide at venues such as Radio City Music Hall and Wembley Stadium in London.

The Richland College dance program provides a challenging teaching and learning environment for students who value diversity. The program develops artistic excellence, fosters creative and collaborative practices and encourages personal agency and social responsibility in appreciating dance.

“Illumination” is free and open to the public in the Fannin Performance Hall on the east side of the Richland College campus. Richland College is located at 12800 Abrams Road. Additional information is available at www.richlandcollege.edu/dance.