Tag Archives: AANAPISI

Richland College Offers 2014-15 Scholarships for Asian American and Pacific Islander Students

The Asian Pacific Islander American Scholarship Fund (APIASF) is now accepting applications from Richland College students for the APIASF Asian American and Native American Pacific Islander – Serving Institution (AANAPISI) Scholarship Program.

The scholarships range between $2,500 and $5,000 and total more than $625,000 for the 2014-15 academic year. This AANAPISI designation makes scholarships available to Richland College Asian American and Pacific Islander students who are enrolled full-time and seeking degrees.

The application deadline is 8 p.m. CST on Oct. 15, 2014. Students should visit apiasf.org for application eligibility requirements and to apply.

Richland College is one of only 15 higher education institutions in the U.S. through which the APIASF is offering the AANAPISI Scholarship Program.

“These scholarships give qualified students the opportunity to achieve their educational goals at Richland College,” said Zarina Blankenbaker, Richland College’s vice president for teaching and learning. “We are proud to partner with APIASF and help these students succeed in the classroom.”

Richland College received a five-year AANAPISI grant from the U.S. Department of Education in 2010 that will total more than $1.4 million in funding. With 14-16 percent of Richland College’s student population comprised of Asian American students and at least half demonstrating financial need, the AANAPISI funding impacts many of the college’s underserved students.

Richland College’s AANAPISI program is focused on three initiatives: creating a college-wide understanding of the effects of poverty on students; adapting the “Achieving the Dream” principles to Richland’s culture and capabilities, resulting in improved success in developmental education and gatekeeper courses; and operating a textbook lending library supporting 50 minority, low-income male students annually.

For information on APIASF, visit apiasf.org.


2014 APIASF scholars at Richland College announced
From left: Tung Dao, APIASF Scholarship Program Director Cecilia Marshall, Maria Louisa Ponsones, Richland College President Kay Eggleston, Damanta Adhikari, Lan Nguyen, Uyen Cao, Sana Hussein, Mai Huynh, Bhagawat Khatiwada and Damodar Dahal.

From left: Tung Dao, APIASF Scholarship Program Director Cecilia Marshall, Maria Louisa Ponsones, Richland College President Kay Eggleston, Damanta Adhikari, Lan Nguyen, Uyen Cao, Sana Hussein, Mai Huynh, Bhagawat Khatiwada and Damodar Dahal.

Asian & Pacific Islander American Scholarship Fund (APIASF) Program Director Cecilia Marshall recognized nine Richland College student recipients of APIASF scholarships during a reception on April 24 hosted by Richland College and sponsored by the Walmart Foundation.

In welcoming APIASF’s representatives, student recipients, community and college faculty and staff, Richland College President Kathryn K. Eggleston thanked the generous donors who support APIASF and Richland College’s partnership toward developing future leaders who excel in their careers, serving as role models in their communities and contributing to a more vibrant America.

Dr. Eggleston cited the growing Dallas County Asian and refugee population and credited the “partnership with APIASF in advancing Richland College’s goals to promote access and achieve equity for students who otherwise would not have this important opportunity to realize their educational goals.”

The scholarships are the result of Richland College’s partnership with APIASF. Richland College is the only U.S. Department of Education-designated Asian American Native American Pacific Islander Serving Institution (AANAPISI) in Texas, and one of nine U.S. higher education institutions chosen by the APIASF to participate in the AANAPISI Scholarship Program.

Asian American students comprise 14 percent of Richland College’s student enrollment. With at least half of these students demonstrating financial need, the APIASF Scholarships and the AANAPISI funding positively impacts many of Richland College’s historically underserved students.


Richland College president served on refugee report review committee

The Asian & Pacific Islander American Scholarship Fund (APIASF), in collaboration with the Association for Asian American Studies, released a new, national report, “Invisible Newcomers: Refugees from Burma/Myanmar and Bhutan in the United States,” that gives voice to and provides comprehensive data about the challenges surrounding these refugee populations.

Kathryn K. Eggleston, Richland College’s president, served as a member of the review committee for the “Invisible Newcomers” report. Richland College is a designated Asian American Native American Pacific Islander Serving Institution (AANAPISI).

The need for a report such as “Invisible Newcomers” was identified through continual assessment of APIASF’s scholarship application cycle, said Neil Horikoshi, APIASF president and executive director.

“We discovered that a growing number of our applicants and scholarship recipients are from the Burmese and Bhutanese communities,” Mr. Horikoshi said. “Further investigation into these groups demonstrated the need for access to educational resources as well as additional research to inform policymakers, higher education leaders and other resource providers about the experiences of students.”

The report found that serious challenges for Burmese and Bhutanese refugees include difficulty navigating systems to access long-term funding and support services; limited English proficiency; intergenerational conflict between children/youth and elders; and the inability to communicate in various realms, including educational access and employment resources.

The APIASF identified several policy implications and made recommendations including:

  • The length of time that adult refugees are eligible for English language education and social support services should be extended.
  • Special attention needs to be paid to the educational outcomes of the refugee population who arrive during their teen years. Some 39 percent of Burmese refugees in the United States have dropped out of high school. This population needs programs to help ease their transition. Intensive educational and social support should be provided to teens to help increase high school graduation rates.
  • Job training and job development are critical factors contributing to improved socioeconomic status. Organizations should strategically provide training to refugees that will lead to permanent positions and focus on areas with future job growth.

Richland College works closely with the APIASF. For the 2013–14 academic year , Richland College was one of only nine higher education institutions in the U.S. through which the APIASF offered scholarships to AANAPISI students.

In 2010, Richland College received a five-year AANAPISI grant from the U.S. Department of Education that will total more than $1.4 million in funding. This AANAPISI funding impacts many of Richland College’s underserved students, as 14 percent of the college’s student population is composed of Asian American students with at least half of those demonstrating financial need.


Richland College offers APIASF scholarship for Asian American and Pacific Islander students

A new scholarship for Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) students is now available at Richland College through its partnership with the Asian & Pacific Islander American Scholarship Fund (APIASF).

The scholarship, $2,500 per recipient for the 2013–14 academic year, is available to full-time, degree-seeking AAPI students. For application eligibility requirements and to apply, visit www.apiasf.org.

The application deadline is 8 p.m. CST on Oct. 11, 2013. Scholarship recipients will be announced in January 2014.

Richland College, a designated Asian American Native American Pacific Islander Serving Institution (AANAPISI), is one of only nine higher education institutions in the U.S. through which the APIASF is offering the AANAPISI Scholarship Program.

“Richland College is proud to be one of only a handful of institutions working with APIASF to provide these scholarships,” said Zarina Blankenbaker, Richland College’s vice president for teaching and learning. “We will be able to provide greater access for qualified students to the exceptional education offered at Richland College and these scholarships will make it possible for students to focus on staying in school and completing their educational goals.”

Richland College received a five-year AANAPISI grant from the U.S. Department of Education in 2010 that will total more than $1.4 million in funding. With 14-16 percent of Richland College’s student population comprised of Asian American students and at least half demonstrating financial need, the AANAPISI funding impacts many of the college’s underserved students.

Richland College’s AANAPISI funding is focused on three initiatives: creating a collegewide understanding of the effects of poverty on students; adapting the “Achieving the Dream” principles to Richland’s culture and capabilities, resulting in improved student success in developmental education and gatekeeper courses; and operating a textbook lending library supporting 50 minority, low-income male students annually.