Tag Archives: AANAPISI

Four people sitting on a stage in a discussion ‘Minority Serving Institution’ Convening Attendees Gain Valuable Insight About Equity and Inclusion

In keeping with its mission of teaching, learning and community building, Richland College, in collaboration with the Asian American Native American Pacific Islander Serving Institution program, has hosted each fall since 2016 the Minority Serving Institution Convening, a conference dedicated to providing higher education professionals with tools to impact the academic success of students at minority-serving institutions. After attending the 2018 MSI Convening, “Minority Student Success: Using Data to Effect Change,” last October, many attendees left the convening with more than just insight on how to achieve minority student success: some also left with a zeal to put ideas learned into practice and provide education and encouragement for others to follow in those same footsteps.

As an MSI Student Fellow, Richland College student Camryn Morrow was nominated by a faculty member to participate in the 2018 MSI Convening. Of everything Morrow heard at the convening, one thing impacted her the most: the importance of showing empathy. “The MSI Convening helped Richland College because it emphasized that professors should go beyond just teaching¾even expressing an ounce of empathy ensures that all students have the same opportunity to succeed,” said Morrow.

Overall, Morrow was encouraged by what she learned at the MSI Convening. “I found the presentations to be reassuring,” she said. “They showed that despite what we don’t see, many things are happening behind the scenes to fix what students consider to be some of the most prevalent of issues, including race. I would highly recommend others attend a future MSI Convening to learn more.” Morrow will also be attending the 2019 MSI Convening, this time to share her experiences at the 2018 conference and as a student at Richland College.

Cassandra Himes, College Connections advisor at the College of the Mainland in Texas City, also attended the 2018 MSI Convening. Upon returning to their institution, Himes and her colleague, Stephanie Dilissio, used what they learned at the convening and put together a presentation for the COM Student Services Leadership Council to share their takeaways and actionable items. Now COM is using the practices and information Himes and Dilissio acquired to examine the college’s processes, including the way COM collects data, the need for all units at COM to collect and analyze quantitative data and the importance of initiating courageous conversations about equity, inclusive excellence and quality programs.

“After attending the MSI Convening, I have a clearer understanding of equity, inclusive excellence and quality, and how to translate those into campus practice,” said Himes. “I approach my work with the guiding question: ‘How can we, at College of the Mainland, continue to improve the way we collect and use quantitative data to design, evaluate, modify and improve programs and initiatives to address the success of minority and underserved students?’ On a personal level, the MSI Convening reignited my commitment to the statement ‘all means all.’”

Himes plans on returning to Richland College to attend the 2019 MSI Convening, and she encourages all higher education professionals to do the same.

Jennifer Baggett, professor of biology at Richland College and MSI Convening faculty program chair, said, “By working hard to provide a high-quality, free conference with nationally recognized speakers, we have created an affordable opportunity for community colleges and other minority-serving institutions to convene, collaborate and learn about research and programs in a data-focused way to improve minority student success. The feedback we’ve received from attendees has been overwhelmingly positive, especially about the quality of presenters, both invited and those selected from breakout session proposals.”

The MSI Convening provides an opportunity for educators and other higher education professionals devoted to student success to gather and participate in presentations and discussions about using data to modify and improve programs and initiatives that address the success of minority and underserved students. The 2019 MSI Convening will be at Richland College Oct. 18-19. Proposals to present are being accepted now through June 7. The MSI Convening is made possible in part through a grant from the AANAPISI program of the Department of Education.

Richland College serves as more than just the host college¾it completely plans and executes the conference each year. The planning team is led by convening chair and executive dean for the School of Social Sciences LaQueta L. Wright, faculty program chairs Baggett, Michael Puente and Rolanda Randle, and faculty logistics chair M.T. Hickman. This team identified the theme and created the structure for a four-year series of conferences, “Using Data to Effect Change”; secured funding support from community partners; invited and guided nationally recognized keynote and plenary speakers; solicited and selected breakout session proposals; oversaw the creation of the conference website, call for proposals and registration system; organized and planned facilities, food and host hotels for the convening, including the evening networking reception and breakfast and lunch on both days; and oversaw the advertising and marketing of the convening, both locally and nationally.

“As the final year of our four-year, grant-funded MSI Convening series approaches, we look forward to seeing what Richland College does from here,” added Baggett. “We have built new relationships with community colleges and four-year minority-serving institutions over the last few years, and we look forward to cementing those relationships into collaborations that lead us all forward in our efforts to improve student success through data-informed programs and initiatives.”

Holding two designations by the U.S. Department of Education as an AANAPISI and a Hispanic-Serving Institution (HSI), Richland College is one of only nine higher education institutions in the U.S. awarded the AANAPISI grant in fiscal year 2015. With 16% of Richland College’s student population comprised of Asian American and Native American Pacific Islander students and at least half demonstrating financial need, AANAPISI funding impacts many of the college’s underserved students. The program helps Richland College to increase the three-year graduation rate for AAPI students who have one or more risks to success and completion, such as financial need or academic challenges.

For more information about the 2019 MSI Convening, visit www.richlandcollege.edu/msi-convening.


Graphic with the words "Minority Serving Institution Convening, Registration for 2018 is Now Open!" Registration Still Open for 2018 Minority Serving Institution Convening at Richland College

Richland College, in collaboration with the Asian American Native American Pacific Islander Serving Institution program, will host the Minority Serving Institution Convening, “Minority Student Success: Using Data to Effect Change,” Oct. 19-20. At this two-day conference, higher education administrators will discuss effective research, initiatives and programs that impact the academic success of students at minority-serving institutions.

Attendance to the MSI Convening is free, and the deadline for registration is Oct. 8.

The MSI Convening provides an opportunity for educators and other higher education professionals devoted to student success to gather and participate in presentations and discussions about using data to modify and improve programs and initiatives that address the success of minority and underserved students.

This year’s event will kick off Friday morning with a keynote address from Tia Brown McNair, president for diversity, equity and student success at the Association of American Colleges and Universities in Washington, D.C. Elva LeBlanc, executive vice chancellor and provost for Tarrant County College District in Texas, will be giving the plenary address Saturday morning. The conference will also include panel discussions and breakout sessions.

Registration is available online at richlandcollege.edu/msi-convening. The website also has additional information, including but not limited to featured speaker biographies, the schedule of events, lodging information and details about past MSI Convenings.

The MSI Convening is made possible in part through a grant from the AANAPISI program of the Department of Education and by State Farm®.

Holding two designations by the U.S. Department of Education as an AANAPISI and a Hispanic-Serving Institution (HSI), Richland College is one of only nine higher education institutions in the U.S. awarded the AANAPISI grant in fiscal year 2015. With approximately 15 percent of Richland College’s student population comprised of Asian American and Native American Pacific Islander students and at least half demonstrating financial need, AANAPISI funding impacts many of the college’s underserved students. The program helps Richland College to increase the three-year graduation rate for AAPI students who have one or more risks to success and completion, such as financial need or academic challenges.


Natalie Tran stands at a podium, smiling and addressing a crowd behind the photographer. Eight Richland College Students Recieve APIASF AANAPISI Scholarships

Eight Richland College students recently received the Asian and Pacific Islander American Scholarship Fund Asian American and Native American Pacific Islander Serving Institution 2018 scholarships. These students include Tran (Jenni) Tran, Joe Cung Tha Lian, Khiem Huynh, Ngan (Natalie) Tran, Roshan Karki, Suhail Sabharwal, Tha Blay Paw and Tho Trieu. They were honored at a scholarship reception on campus May 2.

“I am happy to see students using resources offered to them,” said Michelle Nguyen, AANAPISI program services coordinator at Richland College. “I am so proud of all of the students who received the APIASF AANAPISI scholarship, and I know this means a lot to them. I have seen that they are more confident and motivated since receiving this recognition.”

Jenni Tran, originally from Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, is majoring in business. Lian, originally from Chin, Myanmar, is majoring in education. Huynh, originally from Vietnam, is majoring in computer science with a minor in software engineering. Natalie Tran, originally from Vietnam, is majoring in hospitality management. Karki, originally from Nepal, is majoring in computer science. Sabharwal, from Dallas, is majoring in healthcare administration. Paw, originally from the refugee camp Umphiem in Thailand, is majoring in accounting. Trieu, originally from Chau Phu District, An Giang Province, Vietnam, is majoring in accounting.

The APIASF AANAPISI scholarship is given to students attending APIASF AANAPISI partner colleges and universities, who live at or below the poverty level, are the first in their families to attend college, are representative of the Asian and Pacific Islander American (APIA) community’s diversity and have placed strong emphasis on community service, leadership and academic achievement. For more information, visit apiasf.org/aanapisischolarship.

Richland College is the only higher education institution in Texas that has been awarded an AANAPISI grant due to its large percentage of APIA student population. It was awarded a second five-year, $1.5 million grant in 2015. The AANAPISI program is funded by the U.S. Department of Education under the Office of Postsecondary Education for five consecutive years. The AANAPISI program at Richland College aims to recognize and support the needs of our growing APIA student population by providing resources and opportunities for degree attainment and advancement. For more information, visit richlandcollege.edu/sliferlc/aanapisi.


Four people sitting on a stage in a discussion Creating Academic Success for Minority Students a Key Point of 2017 ‘Minority Serving Institution’ Convening Hosted at Richland College
Four people sitting on a stage in a discussion

Mike Flores, Ph.D., president of Palo Alto College (far right), hosts a panel on minority student success at the 2017 Minority Serving Institution (MSI) Convening at Richland College Oct. 21. Also on the panel were (left to right) Naomi Story, Ph.D., executive director of the National Asian Pacific Islander Council; Colette Pierce Burnette, Ed.D., president of Huston-Tillotson University; and Vincent Solis, Ph.D., senior vice president for academic and student affairs at Laredo Community College. Photo by Keenan Cobb.

Approximately 200 higher education administrators from 19 states, the Federated States of Micronesia, and the U.S. Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands attended the 2017 Minority Serving Institution (MSI) Convening, “Minority Student Success: Using Data to Effect Change,” held Oct. 20-21 at Richland College.

Hosted by Richland College in collaboration with the Asian American Native American Pacific Islander Serving Institution (AANAPISI) program, this conference provided attendees a chance to discuss effective research, initiatives and programs that impact the academic success of students at minority-serving institutions.

While a previous conference focused on best practices and innovation, this year’s MSI Convening focused on covering existing evidence and developing more robust methods for determining success of minority programs and initiatives so that colleges and universities can improve, obtain funding and effect change.

“The 2017 MSI Convening was a very successful event,” said LaQueta Wright, Ph.D., convening chair of the Richland College Planning Team for MSI Convening. “In addition to inspiring talks from higher education leaders during the opening and plenary sessions, small group breakout sessions provided detailed examples of how to design programs from a data-informed perspective, how to evaluate programs in a quantitative way, and success stories of students impacted by programs at colleges across the nation and even as far away as the Pacific islands. The convening also provided opportunities to network and build collaborative relationships with participants from more than 60 different colleges, universities and higher education organizations.”

The event began on Friday with a keynote address from Mike Flores, Ph.D., president of Palo Alto College in San Antonio. A Del Rio native, Flores holds a doctorate degree in educational administration from the University of Texas at Austin. He currently serves as an Achieving the Dream data coach and a board member for the Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities, Communities in Schools San Antonio, the San Antonio Education Partnership and other organizations. He has also served as a fellow with the American Council on Education and conducted postgraduate study at the Harvard University Institute for Educational Management. Since becoming president of Palo Alto College in 2012, he has led many new initiatives for student success.

During the event, Flores guided the conversation to inspire participants to share effective strategies and evidence-based research for evaluating programs and initiatives that support minority student success. “Students come to community colleges like immigrants to America, hoping their journey leads to a better life,” Flores said.

Flores also moderated a panel that included Colette Pierce Burnette, Ed.D., president of Huston-Tillotson University; Vincent Solis, Ph.D., senior vice president for academic and student affairs at Laredo Community College; and Naomi Story, Ph.D., executive director for the National Asian Pacific Islander Council.

Burnette reminded the audience that the concerning data about student success struggles is not new, so rather than focusing on what the data says we should focus on what can be done to change it. Solis discussed how his college attempts to impact student success through faculty support and personal development, saying, “If you’re going to move the needle [on minority student success], it’s going to happen in the classroom.” Story added, “Curriculum and retention are deeply connected, so faculty leadership and buy-in are deeply needed.”

Terrell Strayhorn, Ph.D., founder and CEO of Do Good Work Educational Consulting, LLC, gave the plenary address Saturday morning. Strayhorn holds a doctorate degree in higher education from Virginia Tech and is an internationally recognized student success scholar, highly acclaimed public speaker and award-winning writer. He is the author of 10 books and more than 200 book chapters, journal articles and other scholarly publications. His research focuses on major policy issues in education such as student access and achievement; issues of race, equity and diversity; impact of college on students; and student learning and development. Strayhorn is also known for using the hashtag #DoGoodWork on social media, was named one of the country’s top diversity scholars by Diverse: Issues in Higher Education magazine in 2011, one of Business First’s Top 40 Under 40 and became the youngest full-time professor in Ohio State University’s history in 2014.

Strayhorn talked about how “access without success is useless,” and to achieve student success, we need retention plus persistence. He also stated, “We need a more nuanced framework for understanding our international students and their experiences because these students, like all minority and underserved students, do not have a one-size fits all background.”

The conference also included breakout sessions and a graduate student poster session.

The MSI Convening was made possible in part through a grant from the AANAPISI program of the Department of Education and by State Farm®.

Holding two designations by the U.S. Department of Education as an AANAPISI and a Hispanic-Serving Institution (HSI), Richland College is one of only nine higher education institutions in the U.S. awarded the AANAPISI grant in fiscal year 2015. With approximately 15 percent of Richland College’s student population comprised of Asian American and Native American Pacific Islander (AAPI) students and at least half demonstrating financial need, AANAPISI funding impacts many of the college’s underserved students. The program helps Richland College to increase the three-year graduation rate for AAPI students who have one or more risks to success and completion, such as financial need or academic challenges.

For more information on the MSI Convening, visit richlandcollege.edu/msi-convening.


Richland College to Host 2017 Minority Serving Institution Convening

Richland College, in collaboration with the Asian American Native American Pacific Islander Serving Institution (AANAPISI) program, will host the Minority Serving Institution (MSI) Convening, “Minority Student Success: Using Data to Effect Change,” during which higher education administrators from across the nation will gather to discuss effective research, initiatives and programs that impact the academic success of students at minority-serving institutions. The conference will take place Oct. 20-21.

While previous conferences have focused on best practices and innovation, this year’s MSI Convening will cover existing evidence and develop more robust methods for determining success of minority programs and initiatives so that colleges and universities can improve, obtain funding and effect change.

This year’s event will kick off Friday morning with a keynote address from Dr. Mike Flores, president of Palo Alto College, a part of the Alamo College District in San Antonio. Dr. Terrell Strayhorn, founder and CEO of Do Good Work Educational Consulting, LLC, will be giving the plenary address Saturday morning. The conference will also include panel discussions and breakout sessions.

Attendance is free, and attendees are encouraged to register online by Oct. 6 at richlandcollege.edu/msi-convening.

The MSI Convening is made possible in part through a grant from the AANAPISI program of the Department of Education and by State Farm®.

Holding two designations by the U.S. Department of Education as an AANAPISI and a Hispanic-Serving Institution (HSI), Richland College is one of only nine higher education institutions in the U.S. awarded the AANAPISI grant in fiscal year 2015. With approximately 15 percent of Richland College’s student population comprised of Asian American and Native American Pacific Islander (AAPI) students and at least half demonstrating financial need, AANAPISI funding impacts many of the college’s underserved students. The program helps Richland College to increase the three-year graduation rate for AAPI students who have one or more risks to success and completion, such as financial need or academic challenges.

For more information on the MSI Convening, visit richlandcollege.edu/msi-convening.


Minority Serving Institution Convening at Richland College
Mark Mitsui addressing a crowd from the stage.

Keynote speaker Mark Mitsui, former deputy assistant secretary for community colleges at the U.S. Department of Education and current Portland Community College president, addresses the audience at the MSI Convening at Richland College Oct. 14, 2016. Photo by Paul Knudsen.

Richland College recently hosted the Minority Serving Institution (MSI) Convening, “Minority Student Success: Using Data to Effect Change,” during which higher education administrators gathered to discuss collecting and analyzing quantitative data; evidence-based program development; and research methods, best practices and innovations to impact the academic success of minority student populations.

“Richland College’s inaugural MSI Convening engaged key leaders and practitioners from 61 U.S. Department of Education Minority Serving-designated colleges and universities from throughout the nation to advance a shared narrative aimed at achieving greater minority student success through effective use of data,” said Kathryn K. Eggleston, Ph.D., Richland College president. “Richland College’s pivotal, multi-year convening lead college role will help shape future advances toward greater minority student equity and success.”

This year’s conference focused on using existing research evidence to develop more robust methods for determining the success of minority-serving programs. With these improved methods, college and university representatives can return to their respective institutions to introduce new initiatives, obtain funding and effect positive change.

Presenters at this year’s MSI Convening included keynote speaker Mark Mitsui, former deputy assistant secretary for community colleges at the U.S. Department of Education and current Portland Community College president, and plenary speaker Robert Teranishi, Ph.D., a UCLA professor of social science and comparative education, recently appointed by President Obama to the board of directors of the National Board for Education Services.

The MSI Convening was made possible in part through a grant from the AANAPISI program of the Department of Education and by State Farm®, Presenting Sponsor.

Holding two designations by the U.S. Department of Education as an AANAPISI and a Hispanic Serving Institution (HIS), Richland College is one of only nine higher education institutions in the U.S. awarded the AANAPISI grant in fiscal year 2015. With 15 percent of Richland College’s student population comprised of Asian American and Native American Pacific Islander (AAPI) students and at least half demonstrating financial need, AANAPISI funding impacts many of the college’s underserved students. The program helps Richland College to increase the three-year graduation rate for AAPI students who have one or more risks to success and completion, such as financial need or academic challenges.

For more information on the MSI Convening, visit richlandcollege.edu/msi-convening.


Minority Serving Institution Convening at Richland College Still Accepting Registrants

MSI logo
Registration is currently open for the Minority Serving Institution (MSI) Convening, to be held Oct. 14-15 at Richland College.

The conference, a collaboration between Richland College and the Asian American Native American Pacific Islander Serving Institution (AANAPISI), will focus on “Minority Student Success: Using Data to Effect Change.” Through presentations and workshops focusing on collecting and analyzing quantitative data; evidence-based program development and research methods, best practices and results, attendees can expect to learn what colleges, universities and institutions are doing to support minority groups.

Presenters at this year’s MSI Convening include Mark Mitsui, deputy assistant secretary for community colleges at the U.S. Department of Education, and Robert Teranishi, Ph.D., a professor of social science and comparative education at UCLA who was recently appointed by President Obama as a member on the board of directors for the National Board for Education Services.

The MSI Convening is free to attend and is open to all educators whose institutions serve minority populations. Registration is open through Sept. 30.

Richland College is located at 12800 Abrams Rd. in Dallas, Texas. Additional information, including a link to register for the conference, is available at richlandcollege.edu/msi-convening.


Richland College to Host Community Reception for Asian & Pacific Islander American Scholarship Fund’s ‘CARE’ Report

Richland College will host a community reception at 6 p.m. Dec. 1 for the Asian & Pacific Islander American Scholarship Fund (APIASF), during which the organization will formally announce its next National Commission on Asian American and Pacific Islander Research in Education (CARE) report, “Impact of Scholarships for Asian American and Pacific Islander Community College Students.”

The report highlights the measurable impact of scholarship funding on Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) community college students. The primary goal of this national report is to understand the lived experiences of these students attending community college and the impact that scholarship funding has had on their educational experiences and academic achievement.

The event will include a panel of previous APIASF scholarship recipients, Richland College faculty and staff, APIASF leadership, researchers from the CARE team, local chamber of commerce leadership and Asian community leaders.

Earlier this year, the APIASF awarded scholarships totaling $42,500 to 13 full-time, degree-seeking AAPI students at Richland College.

“I’m grateful for the opportunity to grow as a student due to the contributions of APIASF/USA Funds,” said Richland College student Ezra Jones Calado, one of the 13 students to receive an APIASF scholarship. “It is an honor to be a recipient of this scholarship as it allows me to be an example for my community in promoting the value of higher education. Thank you APIASF/USA Funds for allowing me to achieve my goals while I grow with my dreams.”

“APIASF is grateful for all the work and support of Richland College,” said Neil Horikoshi, APIASF president and executive director. “Richland College president Dr. Kay Eggleston has been a critical player in ensuring Dallas-area AAPI students succeed on and off campus, and we are so excited to bring all the players to the table, from business leaders to students, to share how to best support students and communities. Nearly half of all AAPI students attend community colleges like Richland, and that is why this conversation is so important.”

Richland College is a U.S. Department of Education-designated Asian American and Native American Pacific Islander Serving Institution (AANAPISI), and it is one of only 18 higher education institutions in the U.S. through which the APIASF is offering the AANAPISI Scholarship Program.

The U.S. Department of Education selected Richland College to receive a five-year, $1.5 million federal grant under the AANAPISI program. This program allows Richland College to expand its capacity to serve AAPI students in financial need. The college previously received a five-year AANAPISI grant from the U.S. Department of Education in 2010 that totaled more than $1.4 million in funding. Richland College currently enrolls more than 3,000 AAPI students, comprising nearly 16 percent of its student body.

For information on APIASF, visit www.apiasf.org.


Richland College to Host Asian and Pacific Islander American Scholarship Fund ‘Jump Start’ College Tour

Richland College will host a “Jump Start” college tour for the Asian & Pacific Islander American Scholarship Fund (APIASF) Nov. 14, sponsored by Wells Fargo.

The program provides prospective Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) students and their families with information about college planning, leadership training, financial education and professional development tools and resources. The event is open to high school juniors and seniors, along with their parents.

In addition to attending sessions about college, attendees will also participate in a tour of the Richland College campus.

Earlier this year, the APIASF awarded scholarships totaling $42,500 to 13 full-time, degree-seeking APPI students at Richland College.

Richland College is a U.S. Department of Education-designated Asian American and Native American Pacific Islander Serving Institution (AANAPISI), and it is one of only nine higher education institutions in the U.S. through which the APIASF is offering the AANAPISI Scholarship Program.

Richland College was recently selected to receive a five-year, $1.5 million grant under the AANAPISI program. This program allows Richland College to expand its capacity to serve AAPI students in financial need. The school previously received a five-year AANAPISI grant from the U.S. Department of Education in 2010 that totaled more than $1.4 million in funding.

Registration for the event is free, and breakfast and lunch will be provided. Richland College is located at 12800 Abrams Rd. in Dallas.

To register for the event, visit apiasf.org/jumpstart.


Richland College Awarded Five-Year, $1.5 Million AANAPISI Grant

Richland College was recently selected to receive a five-year, $1.5 million grant under the Asian American and Native American Pacific Islander Serving Institution (AANAPISI) Program. This program will allow Richland College to expand its capacity to serve Asian Americans and Native American Pacific Islander (AAPI) students with financial need.

“This initiative will provide many of our under-resourced AAPI students the opportunity to reach their academic goals,” said Zarina Blankenbaker, Ph.D., Richland College’s vice president for teaching and learning. “We are thrilled once again to be awarded this grant to provide the college with more resources to meet both academically challenged and academically high performing AAPI students where they are and respond to their challenges.”

With 15 percent of Richland College’s student population comprised of AAPI students and at least half demonstrating financial need, the AANAPISI funding impacts many of the college’s underserved students. The program will help Richland College to increase the three-year graduation rate for Asian American and Native American Pacific Islander students who have one or more risks to success and completion, such as financial need or academic challenges.

Richland College is one of only nine higher education institutions in the U.S. awarded the AANAPISI grant in fiscal year 2015.

Richland College previously received a five-year AANAPISI grant from the U.S. Department of Education in 2010 that totaled more than $1.4 million in funding.

For information on the AANAPISI program, visit http://www2.ed.gov/programs/aanapi/index.html.