Category Archives: STEM

Richland College and Girls Inc. Prepare Middle and High School Girls for College and S.T.E.A.M. Careers at Annual Summer Camp
Campers standing in a group.

Girls Inc. campers pose in Sabine Hall on the Richland College campus. Photograph by Paul Knudsen.

For the third year in a row, Richland College is partnering with Girls Inc. of Metropolitan Dallas, a nonprofit organization dedicated to inspiring all girls to be strong, smart and bold, to host the first portion of a four-week summer camp for girls in grades 8-12.

While the camp originally started for middle schoolers, it was expanded to allow girls the opportunity to return for up to five years to continue their educational journey and to encourage college and career awareness among young women.

The Girls Inc. “Eureka!” camp empowers campers to see themselves as an important part of the STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts and Mathematics) workforce of the future. Richland College is hosting the first week, June 13-17, which focuses on “Chemistry: Properties of Water” each morning and “Art: Developing Spatial Reasoning through Geometric Nets” each afternoon. After collecting water samples from the lakes, water fountains and laboratories at Richland College, the girls are employing chemistry techniques to reveal unique qualities of water. In the afternoons, the girls are investigating various geometric nets and their forms through lecture and experimentation. After developing their unique nets, the girls will attach them together to create a non-representational sculpture focusing on design form, space and light.

“We are delighted to partner again with Girls Inc. of Metropolitan Dallas and State Farm in Girls Inc. “Eureka!” at Richland College,” said Sherry Dean, Ph.D., Richland College professor of speech communication. “Two cohorts of 8th and 9th grade girls will participate in a fun and challenging week of STEAM activities at Richland. The girls will use math, chemistry and biology concepts to learn about the unique properties of water; they will code and create personalized webpages; they will learn to manage wisely personal digital spaces; they will contribute to an art installation related to the sex trafficking of minors in Dallas; and they will participate in Zumba and hip hop dance classes. Each of these activities aligns with the mission of Girls Inc. of Dallas to develop smart, strong and bold young women preparing for successful futures.”

Upon completing their first week of camp at Richland College, the girls will go to the University of Texas at Dallas, followed by the University of North Texas at Dallas. The camp concludes at Cedar Valley College.

The camp is sponsored in part by SAP Labs, ExxonMobil, Lockheed Martin, Program for Excellence and a grant from State Farm that is specifically funding the first week of camp at Richland College.


Richland College Unveils Innovative ‘Technology, Engineering and Advanced Manufacturing’ Center on Campus
Joe May and Kay Eggleston standing at a podium.

Dr. Joe May and Dr. Kay Eggleston speak at the opening of the Richland College TEAM Center, April 21, 2016. Photo by Keenan Cobb.

The Richland College Technology, Engineering and Advanced Manufacturing (TEAM) Center had its grand opening yesterday, advancing the college’s mission of teaching, learning and community building. The new TEAM Center also addresses the need to contribute to the growth of the current and future Dallas economy by developing human capital success of key regional industries and employers.

With leading edge, industry-quality technology, the Richland College TEAM Center offers students hands-on learning experiences and delivers career-focused training leading to high-demand jobs in engineering, electrical engineering technology, electronics technology and advanced manufacturing.

Funding for the TEAM Center design, renovation and equipment was made possible through the $1.5 million portion of equipment funding provided by a $3.2 million Trade Adjustment Assistance Community College and Career Training (TAACCCT) grant from the U.S. Department of Labor; more than $2.7 million from the Dallas County Community College District (DCCCD) Chancellor’s Career Ladder Funds; $1.6 million from Richland College’s institutional funds; and a gift of $500,000 from Texas Instruments Incorporated (TI) to fund the newly-redesigned electrical engineering technology programs at Richland, Eastfield and Mountain View colleges.

“The TEAM Center is fully equipped to provide students exceptional hands-on, industry-specific, degree-focused, problem-based learning experiences and career training with stackable industry-recognized certifications,” said Kathryn K. Eggleston, Ph.D., Richland College president.

President Eggleston and Dr. Joe May, DCCCD chancellor, presided at the open house and ribbon cutting, with special guests including Dr. Peter Balyta, president of Texas Instruments Education Technology, and Edgar Garcia, Workforce Development Specialist with the U.S. Department of Labor.

“The leadership of Dallas County Community College District Chancellor Dr. Joe May has been paramount in the success of the significant public-private partnerships necessary to make this TEAM Center possible,” said Eggleston. “Chancellor May is deeply committed to improving the Dallas economy by helping to grow middle-class jobs to jump start new economic investment and job creation.”

The TEAM Center was designed by Aaron Farmer, Yvette Jarvis and Fred Peña of Booziotis & Company Architects. Also involved in the design and construction process were David Boon and Ken Fulk, project engineers with Reed, Wells, Benson and Company; Jacob Williams, project manager, and Danny Purselley, project superintendent, with Byrne Construction Services; Judy Lembke, construction manager with Lemco Construction Services; and Clyde Porter, DCCCD associate vice chancellor/district architect, and Jean Hill, DCCCD project manager.

The advanced manufacturing program at Richland College prepares students for entry-level manufacturing positions through an associate degree, three certificates and two skills achievement awards. The electrical engineering technology degree and electronics technology degree prepare students for technician-level employment in semiconductor, electronics and related industries through an associate degree or a certificate.


Richland College to Celebrate Technological Innovation at Grand Opening of Its ‘Technology, Engineering and Advanced Manufacturing’ Center
Students work on advanced manufacturing equipment at the TEAM Center.

Students work on advanced manufacturing equipment at the TEAM Center.

Richland College will host an open house at 3 p.m. Apr. 21 to celebrate the grand opening of its new Technology, Engineering and Advanced Manufacturing (TEAM) Center, located in Wichita Hall.

With leading-edge, industry-quality technology, the TEAM Center at Richland College offers students hands-on learning experiences and delivers career-focused training leading to high-demand jobs in engineering, electrical engineering technology, electronics and advanced manufacturing.

Two professors bending over a female student working with electronic equipment

Richland College instructors Kory Goldammer and Simona Farcasiu help a student in an electronics lab in the TEAM Center.

The TEAM Center was made possible in part by a Trade Adjustment Assistance Community College and Career Training (TAACCCT) grant from the U.S. Department of Labor. This $3.25 million grant equipped Richland College with the tools to train Texans who require new, up-to-date job skills for immediate employment. Additional funding for the TEAM Center was provided by Texas Instruments and Dallas County Community College District and Richland College funds.

“With TAACCCT funds, Richland College is strategically positioned to bridge critical gaps of two kinds: one between the workforce and specialized employment training, and the other between that workforce and local employer needs,” said Kathryn K. Eggleston, Ph.D., Richland College president.

 

Two students working on some equipment

Two students work on advanced manufacturing equipment in the TEAM Center.

President Eggleston and Joe D. May, Ed.D., Dallas County Community College District chancellor will preside at the open house and ribbon cutting. Attendees will have the chance to visit the advanced manufacturing lab, robotics lab and electronics labs, where the new equipment and student instructional demonstrations will be on display.

The advanced manufacturing program prepares students for entry-level manufacturing positions through an associate degree plan, certificate plan or two skills achievement awards. The electronics technology program prepares students for technician-level employment in electronics and related industries through an associate degree plan or a certificate plan.


Richland College Earns Tech Titans Award Nomination for S.T.E.M. Summer Camp for Girls

The Metroplex Technology Business Council announced this morning that Richland College is a finalist for the Tech Titan of the Future University Level award for its STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) summer camp for middle school girls. The camp is a partnership with Girls Inc. of Dallas, a nonprofit organization dedicated to inspiring all girls to be strong, smart and bold, and the University of Texas at Dallas.

The camp, called “EUREKA!”, empowers campers to see themselves as an important part of the STEM workforce of the future.

“We are delighted and grateful for this recognition from the Metroplex Technology Business Council,” said Sherry Dean, Ph.D., Richland College professor of speech communication. “In this unique partnership with Girls Inc. of Dallas and the University of Texas at Dallas, we are nurturing a cohort of eighth grade girls over a five-year period. We are growing their academic skills and empowering them to pursue STEM majors and future STEM careers. We believe this program will influence these young women for many years to come.”

The Tech Titans awards consist of 12 categories, with six to 10 nominations and up to four finalists in each category. The winners will be announced Aug. 21 at the Tech Titans Awards Gala at the Intercontinental Hotel in Addison, TX.

The Tech Titans Awards Gala, sponsored by AT&T, recognizes the most elite in North Texas technology – individuals currently transforming the high-tech industry and giving companies that competitive edge. The Tech Titans awards showcase the innovators, adopters and executors impacting the technology industry for the greater good.


Richland College Partners with Girls Inc. to Provide Middle School Girls a Glimpse Into College Life and Access to S.T.E.M. Programs and Careers
Girls huddled around a lab table.

Girls Inc. campers participate in lab activities at Richland College on their first day of camp Monday, June 22. Photograph by Paul Knudsen.

For the second year in a row, Richland College recently partnered with Girls Inc. of Dallas, a nonprofit organization dedicated to inspiring all girls to be strong, smart and bold, to host part of a four-week summer camp for middle school girls.

The camp, called “EUREKA!”, empowers campers to see themselves as an important part of the STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) workforce of the future. Richland College is hosting the first week, June 22-26, which focuses on “Water: Ubiquitous and Unique.” The girls are exploring various properties of Earth’s most important resource in the contexts of sustainability and ecology. The curriculum includes experiential learning activities in the sciences, 3-D art, learning strategies, college readiness and communications skills. Each afternoon, the girls also learn about the physics and fun behind the hula-hoop.

“The unique feature of this program is that we are intentionally nurturing a cohort of girls in STEM fields over a five-year period,” said Sherry Dean, Ph.D., Richland College professor of speech communication. “We will nurture them through high school graduation and help them secure successful higher education pathways in a STEM major. By the time these girls graduate, they will have both the knowledge and confidence to pursue a career in STEM.”

Upon completing their first week of camp at Richland College, the girls will go to the University of North Texas at Dallas, followed by the University of Texas at Dallas. The camp concludes at Cedar Valley College on July 24 with a closing ceremony featuring a rocket launch.

“The accumulation of learning and exposure to STEM over the course of four weeks could have a tremendous impact on a girl’s future,” said Girls Inc. of Dallas CEO Lori Palmer. “We hope to help girls become well equipped for the future by exposing them to diverse opportunities like careers in STEM and ongoing summer learning opportunities.”

The “EUREKA!” program is sponsored in part by SAP Labs, the TI Foundation, ExxonMobil and a $10,000 grant from State Farm that is specifically funding the first week of camp at Richland College.


Richland College and Oklahoma State University Institute of Technology Sign “Bachelor of Technology Pathway Partnership”
Kay Eggleston and Bill Path shake hands

Richland College president Kathryn K. Eggleston, Ph.D., signs an agreement with OSUIT president Bill R. Path, Ph.D., to allow electronics technology students seamless academic transfer to OSUIT upon completion of their associate degree at Richland College.

Richland College signed a five-year “Bachelor of Technology Pathway Partnership” agreement with Oklahoma State University Institute of Technology (OSUIT), allowing electronics technology students the opportunity to earn a bachelor’s degree from OSUIT upon completion of their associate degree at Richland College.

“This new partnership is vital to our region’s industry employers seeking competitive advantage through a highly-skilled, knowledgeable workforce that is able to design, specify, troubleshoot and manage instrumentation and control systems in a highly technical environment,” said Kathryn K. Eggleston, Ph.D., president of Richland College.

This agreement provides a seamless transfer of coursework between the Richland College Associate of Applied Science in Electronics Technology and the Bachelor of Technology in Instrumentation Engineering Technology (BT in IET) at OSUIT. Any Richland College student who successfully completes the required coursework may transfer and apply up to 68 credit hours to the OSUIT BT in IET degree.

“No matter what state we are in, as institutions of higher education our primary concern must be to prepare students for their future and ensure what they learn while enrolled in college translates to what they need to know when they join the workforce,” said Bill R. Path, Ph.D., president of OSUIT. “This road to success that we have paved across the Red River means that Richland students who continue on to OSUIT will have the skills they need and the opportunities they want upon graduation to move forward and become highly-qualified candidates for employment.”

Richland College and OSUIT share a commitment to increasing opportunities for student access to and success in higher education and will partner to provide focused advising for any students who consider pursuing this opportunity.

Richland College students interested in this program should visit their academic advisors. For more information on Richland College’s engineering technology program, visit www.richlandcollege.edu/et. For information on OSUIT, visit www.osuit.edu.


Richland College Designated as 2015 STEM Jobs Approved College

STEM-related iconsRichland College has been recognized as a 2015 STEM Jobs Approved College by Victory Media for its innovative Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) programs and center.

Richland College is included on the 2015 STEM Jobs Approved College list for its STEM job alignment, STEM job placement and the diversity of its STEM programs.

Richland College’s STEM Center prepares students for work in a competitive science- and technology-based economy and establishes well-defined student career pathways. It provides support and guidance to students pursuing STEM careers, with a special emphasis on women and historically underserved populations with fewer resources. STEM advisors provide recruitment of and focus on new-to-college students who indicate a desire to pursue STEM careers. Using this advising process, students identify and follow clear, direct career pathways with multiple points of advisor contact, mentoring and scholarship opportunities.

“Being a STEM Jobs Approved College shows that Richland College is committed to providing a quality, relevant education to our STEM students that will translate into excellent career prospects,” said Martha Hogan, Richland College’s executive dean of the School of Engineering, Business and Technology. “Our STEM advisors ensure our students have a clear path of study, leading to job opportunities and seamless transfers to four-year institutions. This helps steer our students to success in their chosen STEM fields.”

Richland College was recently chosen to participate in the White House College Opportunity Day of Action, during which President Obama, the First Lady and Vice President Biden announced new actions to help more students prepare for and graduate from college. Richland College committed to expanding its STEM Center to reach more than 4,000 students during the next three to five years with proven programs to increase STEM success.


Richland College Announces Commitment to Expand College Access at White House Event

Richland College president Kathryn K. Eggleston, Ph.D., and Dallas County Community College District chancellor Joe D. May, Ed.D., are joining President Obama, the First Lady, Vice President Biden and hundreds of other college presidents and higher education leaders in Washington, D.C., today to announce new actions to help more students prepare for and graduate from college.

The White House College Opportunity Day of Action will support the President’s commitment to partner with colleges and universities, business leaders and nonprofits to support students across the country to help the nation reach its goal of leading the world in college attainment.

“Richland College is well-positioned to be a part of such an ambitious initiative to assist greater numbers of students in their educational pursuits toward degree completion and well-paying jobs,” said Eggleston.

To be a part of this event, Richland College committed to expanding its Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) Center to reach more than 4,000 students during the next three to five years with proven programs to increase STEM success.

Richland College was able to create the STEM Center by leveraging community partnerships and external resources. Initially partnering with the University of Texas at Dallas as a sub-recipient of a Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics Talent Expansion Program (STEP) grant from the National Science Foundation, Richland College has fully funded its STEM Center to advance STEM-graduate completion.

Richland College’s STEM Center prepares students for work in a competitive science and technology-based economy and establishes well-defined student career pathways. It provides support and guidance to students pursuing STEM careers, with a special emphasis on women and historically underserved populations with fewer resources. STEM advisors provide recruitment of and focus on new-to-college students who indicate a desire to pursue STEM careers. Using this advising process, students identify and follow a clear, direct career pathway with multiple points of advisor contact, mentoring and scholarship opportunities.

“Our STEM advisors and faculty are an invaluable resource to students pursuing STEM degrees,” Eggleston said. “Through them, the students are able to navigate their college experience with greater focus, allowing for a seamless transition to university transfer and excellent job opportunities.”

To attain its goal of reaching more than 4,000 students during the next three to five years, Richland College will establish additional focused career pathway opportunities with universities that include research, design and practice-based experiences. It will also expand its summer Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts and Math (STEAM) Camp designed to serve 8th grade girls in underserved and under-resourced populations in a community partnership with Girls, Inc. The camp is designed and taught by Richland’s STEAM faculty, who are women and minority women, providing role models for young women at a critical age in their aspirational direction.

Participants in the White House College Opportunity Day of Action were asked to commit to new action in one of four areas: building networks of colleges around promoting completion, creating K-16 partnerships around college readiness, investing in high school counselors as part of the First Lady’s Reach Higher initiative or increasing the number of college graduates in the STEM fields.

The President will announce new steps on how his administration is helping to support these actions, including $10 million to help promote college completion and a $30 million AmeriCorps program that will improve low-income students’ access to college. Today’s event is the second College Opportunity Day of Action, and it will include a progress report on the commitments made at the first day of action that took place Jan. 14, 2014.

Expanding opportunity for more students to enroll and succeed in college, especially low-income and underrepresented students, is vital to building a strong economy and a strong middle class. Today, only 9 percent of those born in the lowest family income quartile attain a bachelor’s degree by age 25, as compared to 54 percent in the top quartile. In an effort to expand college access, the Obama Administration has increased Pell scholarships by $1,000 per year, created the new American Opportunity Tax Credit worth up to $10,000 over four years of college, limited student loan payments to 10 percent of income and laid out an ambitious agenda to reduce college costs and promote innovation and completion.


Richland College Awarded $3.25 Million Grant From U.S. Department of Labor

DALLAS – Richland College, of the Dallas County Community College District, is one of only two Texas institutions awarded a Trade Adjustment Assistance Community College and Career Training (TAACCCT) grant from the U.S. Department of Labor during a ceremony hosted by Vice President Joe Biden, Secretary of Labor Thomas E. Perez and Secretary of Education Arne Duncan in Washington, D.C., on Mon., Sept. 29.

This $3.25 million grant will help equip Richland College train Texans who require new job skills for immediate employment. By leveraging Richland’s existing manufacturing and electronics technology programs, partnerships with 14 Dallas employers, the City of Garland, the City of Richardson and the Metroplex Technology Business Council with TAACCCT grant funds, the Veterans-Focused Engineering Technology Project (VFETP) will meet the needs of local veterans and others who seek training to enter or re-enter the local job market.

The VFETP offers associate degrees (with credit-applicable education or experience) in manufacturing and electronics technology. The program also will offer certificates in electromechanical maintenance, advanced design for manufacturing, and supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA). The curricula will follow national credentialing standards from the National Institute for Metalworking Skills (NIMS) and the International Society of Certified Electronic Technicians (ISCET). Richland College’s employer partners include Alexandria Industries; Atlas Copco; the City of Richardson, Texas; DW Distribution; Garland Power & Light; Kenney Industries; Oncor; QT Manufacturing; Raytheon; Romeo Engineering; Smart GeoMetrics; Texas Instruments; the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center; the North Texas chapter of the National Tooling & Machining Association; and the Metroplex Technology Business Council. Richland College will collaborate with Workforce Solutions Greater Dallas to identify potential students, including veterans, as well.

The employer partners have committed to hiring program completers, supporting curriculum development, offering internships and providing on-the-job training for students.

Dr. Kathryn K. Eggleston, president of Richland College, said, “With TAACCCT funds, Richland College is strategically positioned to bridge critical gaps of two kinds: one between the workforce and specialized employment training and the other between that workforce and local employer needs. The VFETP is designed to help Texans access training, to help them succeed in completing training and to match program completers with jobs in growing industries.”

Dr. Joe May, DCCCD’s chancellor, said, “The Dallas County Community College District focuses on job-driven training and and partnerships that can help rebuild America’s middle class. The grant received by Richland College means that we can train students – veterans, in particular – in fields that will continue to grow and which offer jobs now in the fields of advanced manufacturing, mechatronics and electronics manufacturing. We support economic and workforce development, and this grant enables Richland College to involve industry partners, support our communities and assist veterans as they seek good jobs and re-enter the workforce.”

Richland College’s grant funding is part of the larger TAACCCT competitive grant program co-administered by the U.S. Department of Labor’s Employment and Training Administration (ETA) and the U.S. Department of Education. ETA announced 71 new grants under this program to single-institution applications and intra-state consortiums across the nation. The purpose of TAACCCT grants is to close educational gaps between potential employees and employers in growing industries, such as advanced manufacturing.

“Community colleges play a vital role in training Americans to meet the needs of employers today,” said Secretary of Education Arne Duncan. “As our economy continues to rebuild, businesses are looking for employees with the skills their company needs to stay competitive….These grants help meet those demands, providing critical investments in education and supporting key partnerships.”

Watch the grant announcement ceremony:

For more information about Richland’s manufacturing and electronics technology programs, visit http://www.richlandcollege.edu/engineeringtech/ and http://www.richlandcollege.edu/certs/manufacturingTechnology and or contact Martha Hogan, executive dean, Richland College School of Engineering, Business and Technology, by email at mhogan@dcccd.edu or by phone at (972) 238-6210.  


First week of Girls Inc. camp at Richland gives girls inspiration, opportunities in STEAM fields

Girls to experience more learning, campus life at UT Dallas during second week

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Twenty middle school girls explored science, technology, mathematics, arts and engineering (STEAM) concepts and discovered the joy of learning this week at Richland College.

These Dallas-area 8th grade girls were selected to participate in Girls Inc. SMART Summer College Camp, a two-week learning experience designed by Girls Inc. of Metropolitan Dallas, Richland College and The University of Texas at Dallas – Science and Engineering Education Center (SEEC).

The first week of camp, held June 16-20 at Richland College, focused on “Water: Ubiquitous and Unique.” The girls learned about the various properties of Earth’s most important resource in the contexts of sustainability and ecology. The curriculum included experiential learning activities in the sciences as well as in 3-D art, learning strategies and college readiness skills. Each afternoon, the girls experienced the physics and fun behind the hula hoop.

Sherry Dean, Richland College speech communication professor and Girls Inc. board member, says the week was an amazing success.

“We saw the girls grow a lot,” Dr. Dean says. “It was a very intense learning community. This week sets the stage for thinking routines and helping the girls see connections. The girls created ePortfolios to showcase their experiences. They will be able to look back on this week and realize how they’ve become stronger, smarter and bolder.”

Dr. Dean said another important goal was achieved — introducing the girls to a pathway more and more students take to pursue higher education: the community college experience. Richland has some 20,000 credit students and offers Richland Collegiate High School (RCHS), a dual-credit charter high school.

“We planted important seeds for them,” she says. “The girls really enjoyed being on the campus and we introduced them to RCHS. They were excited to consider options. I believe we had a positive influence on their aspirational goals for higher education.”

Next week, June 22-27, the girls will experience campus life at UT Dallas, living in dorm suites, finding out what it takes to apply for college and participating in learning activities in bioengineering, nanotechnology, forensic science, robotics and space science.

At UT Dallas, the girls also will have the opportunity to connect with science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) professionals from the university and Dallas’ business community. Evenings will be filled with fun activities such as karaoke, Zumba and movies. The week culminates with a field trip to Texas Instruments.

Expanding the horizons of the young women selected to participate is a significant goal of the camp, says Lori Palmer, CEO of Girls Inc. of Metropolitan Dallas.

“Girls Inc. SMART Summer College Camp will awaken the potential in middle school girls as they explore the life of a full-time college student and discover opportunities in STEM fields,” Ms. Palmer says. “We encourage girls to explore STEM fields because research demonstrates that women employed in STEM careers earn an average of 33 percent more than those employed in other fields.”

Bernine Khan, UT Dallas’ SEEC director, says UT Dallas is thrilled to host week two of the camp because while the university is distinguished for its strength in STEM education and research, females make up only about 43 percent of the student body.

“Females, in general, represent a hugely untapped resource of potential STEM professionals in our nation, and when compounded with low socio-economic and cultural issues, the pathway to a successful STEM career is stymied,” Dr. Khan says. “The program introduces these girls to the flavors of STEM careers through interactions with female STEM professionals. If the girls ultimately choose a non-STEM field, it will be an informed choice with the full knowledge that their intrinsic ability had no bearing on their decision.”

Learn more about Girls Inc. of Metropolitan Dallas at www.girlsincdallas.org, Richland College at www.richlandcollege.edu and The University of Texas at Dallas at www.utdallas.edu.