Category Archives: News

exterior of Richland College Garland Campus Richland College Garland Campus Honors Local Businesses With Annual Partnership Awards

Richland College Garland Campus is committed to serving the local community through corporate and workforce training, recognizing the importance of building sustainable community partnerships to provide customized training that is beneficial to both employers and their employees. One of the many ways Richland College Garland Campus shows its appreciation to its partners is by recognizing local companies with Corporate Services’ Partnership Awards, which are presented each year at the Garland Chamber of Commerce’s annual banquet.

“The top three words we hear from employers is ‘workforce, workforce, workforce’,” said Konley Kelley, Richland College Garland Campus director of corporate and community relations. “The greatest assets our clients have are their employees. We are privileged to provide these employees training options and solutions that meet their needs. The Partnership Awards are both a recognition and a ‘Thank you’ from the college for this relationship that we value.”

The Partnership Awards were established to meet a “client recognition” goal. Companies are nominated by Richland College grant coordinators and staff. The review committee for these awards is comprised of college leadership and members of the Garland Chamber of Commerce.

The DCMA Partnership Award recognizes clients who are part of the DCMA and have met and exceeded performance goals as a partner in a Skills Development Grant from the Texas Workforce Commission. The performance goals are set in the grant application and fulfilled through a working relationship with the college to deliver an agreed number of classes for grant-eligible participants. The grant duration can be a year to 18-months long.

The Community Partnership Award recognizes clients who have actively worked with the college in areas such as contract/company-sponsored training, apprenticeship programs and the hiring of students from the Workforce Training programs at the Garland Campus. These companies typically send staff to present to students in the Workforce Training programs and participate in job fairs and career guidance.

More than 200 chamber members were hosted at this year’s banquet, sponsored by its 2018 board of directors. Rose Galloway, associate vice president of workforce and continuing education at Richland College, was honored as the incoming chairwoman of the board for the chamber. Also at the event, Ron Clark, vice president for business services at Richland College, presented Epiroc Drilling Solutions with the DCMA Partnership Award, and he presented General Dynamics Ordinance and Tactical Systems with the Community Partnership Award. These awards recognized the significant training investment each company provided to their employees and their support of programs at Richland College Garland Campus.

“We are very proud to have received this award,” said Tanya Tyler, human resources manager for Epiroc Drilling Solutions, who accepted the award alongside Karine Dubois, vice president Human Resources for Epiroc. “Epiroc Drilling Solutions strives to be a company that values the knowledge and development of our employees. Partnering with the Garland Campus for training has been invaluable to us as an organization and in our efforts to have the best trained workforce around!”

Epiroc Drilling Solutions received this award for its participation in a Richland College Garland Campus Skills Development Fund grant. The company providing training to 108 Epiroc employees, including 79 new employees, which far exceeded grant projections. Epiroc received classes in electrical basics and troubleshooting, forklift certification, MSSC certification, 5S, root cause analysis, lean six sigma, project management, CPR and leadership training.

“Garland Campus has been a great partner for us when it comes to training our employees,” added Tyler. “Not only through the state grant, but also in scheduling classes onsite at our facility or at Richland’s main campus whenever we need them, which has been incredibly helpful in training our employees. The Richland employees we work with, like Ric Guerrero, are very flexible and responsive to our needs as an organization.”

General Dynamics Ordinance and Tactical Systems participated in grant training in 2017-18 and used Richland College Garland Campus for contract training in arc flash, train the trainer, coaching millennials and geometric dimensioning and tolerancing. In addition, General Dynamics is the first DCMA company to participate in a registered DOL apprenticeship program in manufacturing, a project for which Garland Campus is providing technical training. Craig Conner accepted the award on behalf of General Dynamics during the ceremony.

The Partnership Awards have been held since 2012. Previous winners include:

  • 2012: Hatco, DCMA; and Dallas County, Community
  • 2013: Micropac, DCMA; and Plastipak Packaging, Community
  • 2014: Interceramic, DCMA; and Perot Museum, Community
  • 2015: Unity Manufacturing, DCMA (more than 100 employees); Atlas Copco, DCMA (fewer than 100 employees); and City of Garland, Community
  • 2016: Micropac, DCMA; General Dynamics, DCMA; and City of Garland, Community
  • 2017: Sanden-Vendo, DCMA; DAP, Community; and Data-Matique, Community
  • 2018: Mapei, DCMA; and Aloe Vera, Community

In addition to these awards, Kelley, who was last year’s Leadership Garland Distinguished Leader Award recipient, presented this year’s Distinguished Leader Award to Garland Fire Marshall Mike Van Buskirk.

“The Garland Campus is here to serve the community and its companies, many of which are valued manufacturing companies in the Dallas County Manufacturers’ Association and the Garland area,” said Kelley. “Whether the company or organization dedicates time for employees to train on a grant or sponsor training, the college is proud to serve and help keep this economy growing.”

Tyler added, “As an organization, we believe that training is an integral part in having a high-performing workforce. We have company goals and standards as far as the minimum number of training hours every year for each employee, and Richland has been incredibly helpful over the years in accomplishing that goal. We look forward to partnering with Richland in the future to continue to provide high quality training for our employees for many years to come!”


Headshot of Kathleen Stephens Richland College Honors Program Coordinator Kathleen Stephens Named ‘Advisor of the Year’ by National Society of Collegiate Scholars

Richland College Honors Program coordinator Kathleen Stephens was recently named Region 3 Chapter Advisor of the Year by the National Society of Collegiate Scholars. According to NSCS, she was selected for her “strong leadership and unwavering support and dedication to the NSCS Chapter at Richland College.”

Stephens is the founding advisor for the Richland College NSCS chapter, which began in spring 2015. Colleague Patrick Moore, professor in the School of Social Sciences and Wellness, is also an NSCS advisor.

“It’s been a remarkable experience to watch our NSCS chapter grow from a new honor society in spring 2015 to have it achieve Gold Star status for the first time this year from the national office,” said Stephens. “I enjoy participating in the leadership development of chapter officers and helping them learn how to handle communication, responsibility and delegation. I’m very proud of them and all that they have achieved.”

In addition to her full-time duties as Honors Program coordinator, Stephens’ responsibilities as an NSCS advisor include attending new member induction ceremonies, meetings and events sponsored by the chapter; and sharing advice with officers and members.

“Your passion and commitment for student success are evident and you go above and beyond to support the chapter and encourage chapter officers to be leaders,” said Susan Kuper, director of Chapter Advisor and Campus Relations at NCSC. “We are impressed by the student leaders of your chapter and all that they have accomplished this year.”

As part of her award, Stephens will be awarded a $150 professional stipend. Her registration fee for the Leadership Excellence and Advisor Development certification online course, offered to NSCS advisors in June 2019, will also be waived.

Founded in 1994 at the George Washington University in Washington, D.C., NSCS is a member of the Association of College Honor Societies and is a recognized organization at more than 300 campuses across the country. This nonprofit honors organization recognizes and elevates high achievers and provides career and graduate school connections, leadership and service opportunities, and awards one million dollars in scholarships annually¾more than any other honor society. For more information, visit nscs.org.

The NSCS chapter at Richland College is part of Region 3, which consists of Texas, New Mexico, Arizona, California and Hawaii. Richland’s chapter achieved Gold Star status for the first time in spring 2019, an honor that reflects the chapter’s highly engaged members. The officers have organized several community service events this year, including a mental health awareness event as part of NSCS’s partnership with Active Minds. For more information about Richland’s NSCS chapter, visit richlandcollege.edu/cd/instruct-divisions/rlc/mshp/honors-program/pages/nscs.aspx. Students who have earned at least a 3.4 GPA on 9 college-level credit hours may self-nominate to NSCS at nscs.org/self-nomination.


Colin Allred and Richland President Kay Eggleston pose together. Rep. Colin Allred Speaks at Richland College TRIO Student Support Services Ceremony

Richland College TRIO Student Support Services honored six students as TRIO Achievers at the 2019 TRIO Day Student Success Celebration, attended by Rep. Colin Allred (TX-32), Apr. 24. The students honored were Whitney Boyer, Nick Gjonaj, Felicia Keto, Christian Lara, Cedrick Munongo and Brytha Nkrumah.

“The federal TRIO programs are a set of educational opportunity programs established in 1964 that enable either first-generation-to-college or low-income students and underrepresented special needs populations to earn college degrees,” said Kathryn K. Eggleston, Richland College president. “The Richland College TRIO Student Support Services program is a component of the federal TRIO programs.”

At the event, Rep. Allred addressed the students and other guests, praising the accomplishments of the TRIO Achievers and encouraging the students not to give up on their version of the American dream.

“I want to congratulate the students here at Richland College, and the families who supported them, who succeeded in part because of this wonderful TRIO program,” said Rep. Allred. “This program, and really the charge of Richland College generally, provides opportunities for so many students throughout north Texas.”

Following Rep. Allred’s remarks, students Keto, Lara, Munongo and Nkrumah each told their personal stories of hardship and ultimate success in a TED Talks-style format. Keto, Munongo and Nkrumah are immigrants to the U.S. and outlined the paths they took not just to arrive in the U.S., but to succeed at Richland College. Lara, a first generation American, shared his story of his troubled past, showing a determination not only to succeed, but thrive.

“Success is the biggest thing that we should strive for, and we should never let anyone take that away from us,” Lara said. “The only person that can stop us is ourselves.”

The presentation, recorded by Richland Student Media, is available in its entirety at www.richlandstudentmedia.com/videos/trio.

TRIO programs assist students in overcoming the obstacles they face as the first generation in their families to attend and graduate from a college or university. Today, an estimated 5 million students have graduated from college with the support and assistance of TRIO programs across the country. For more information about TRIO programs, visit www.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ope/trio/index.html.

Since 1993, The TRIO-SSS program at Richland College has assisted eligible students in achieving their academic pursuits by offering several customized academic components designed to increase college retention and graduation rates. These free services include academic advisement, tutoring, assistance in financial aid application, university field trips, college success workshops and cultural enrichment opportunities. For more information, visit www.richlandcollege.edu/sss.


An illustration of a hand putting a ballot into a voting box Dallas Mayoral Forum Recording Available from Richland Student Media

Richland Student Media, in partnership with the League of Women Voters and the North Dallas Chamber of Commerce, recorded an Apr. 3 Dallas mayoral forum for the joint goal of giving students a learning experience while also providing a community service by educating voters.

The Apr. 3 mayoral forum was moderated by Ron Chapman, former district, state and appellate court judge. The forum took place in the Scottish Rite Hospital auditorium.

View the forum in its entirely by clicking here. The Dallas mayoral election will be Saturday, May 4.


A woman poses with eyeglasses Richland College Launches Ophthalmology Assistant Program

To meet the needs of the growing eye-care industry, Richland College recently launched a new ophthalmology assistant program, accredited by the Joint Commission on Allied Health Personnel in Ophthalmology.

Students who complete the 256-hour program and pass the national certification exam can become certified ophthalmology assistants. COAs aid ophthalmologists, retinal specialists and other eye-care professionals in an office or clinical setting, and they also document patient medical history, perform pupil assessments and visual acuity measurements, administer some medications and provide patient education. Upon passing the COA national certification exam, students can continue their training to become ophthalmology technicians or ophthalmology technologists, with national certification exams also available for these higher-level eye-care professions.

Day and evening courses are available, and the program can typically be completed in two to three semesters. Courses offered in the program include Visual System (OPTS 1011), Ophthalmic Techniques (OPTS 2041), Basic Contact Lenses (OPTS 1015) and Vision Care Office Procedures (OPTS 1060).

Interested prospective students can learn more about the program, including eligibility requirements and approximate tuition costs, by visiting https://www.richlandcollege.edu/cd/ce/cepgms/health/pages/ophthalmology-assistants.aspx.


An aerial, black and white image of the northeast corner of Little Egypt in 1962. Dallas’ Lost Neighborhood, “Little Egypt,” is Focus of Free Presentation at African American Museum

When Richland College faculty members Clive Siegle and Tim Sullivan started collaborating on the joint project “Finding Little Egypt,” little did they know how far they and their students would delve into the history and anthropology of a Dallas neighborhood which disappeared decades ago.

The history of that missing community and where its residents went will be the subject of a free presentation by Siegle and Sullivan on Sat., Feb. 9, at the African American Museum of Dallas. “Lost and Found: Little Egypt, Fifty Years Later,” which starts at 1 p.m. in the museum’s AT&T auditorium, is free and open to the public. 

Siegle, the historian, lives on the cusp of the long-lost neighborhood, but the significance of that location wasn’t apparent until he noticed a subtle difference between the curb and streets of a nearby shopping center and the rest of his neighborhood.

Siegle started checking with his own neighbors and learned that the shopping center sat on the site of a black community whose residents and homes disappeared almost overnight in the 1960s. Founded by a former slave, Little Egypt was located on 30 acres of land along Northwest Highway – an area currently known as the Lake Highlands neighborhood of Dallas.

The rest, as they say, is history – and a past that the Richland College professor and his colleague began to track down and document three years ago. 

“We are excited to share our findings and the history of Little Egypt with the Dallas community,” said Siegle. “Preserving history is critical, and we want people to learn more about African American communities like Little Egypt. It’s particularly fitting that we are sharing our work at the African American Museum during Black History Month. With our students’ help and the support of family members who lived in Little Egypt, the project will continue to expand as we document the history of that community.”

Little Egypt, during its heyday, thrived for 80 years – even without city services and paved streets which surrounding neighborhoods enjoyed – and then almost mysteriously disappeared overnight in 1962 when a developer became interested in the tract of land. More than 200 residents sold their homes and moved out at the same time, using 37 moving vans; the neighborhood was torn down almost immediately.

Who were those residents? Where did they go? Where could Siegle and Sullivan start to trace the neighborhood’s history and relocation? Those are the questions that Richland College students have been working on with their professors, starting with the community’s Egypt Chapel Baptist Church and nearby McCree Cemetery, using old photographs, search grids, measurements, surface artifacts and documents to do some old-fashioned detective work.

That’s the story they will tell during their presentation at the African American Museum. Siegle and Sullivan also will share their most current work: locating, charting and excavating the home of the McCoy family whose house sat on the only piece of land that was never redeveloped after the neighborhood disappeared. They also are creating a computer-generated, 3-D model of the home.

Members of the McCoy family have been instrumental in assisting with the Little Egypt project, said Siegle, as well as providing crucial information about life in the settlement during the years prior to its demise.

Siegle, who came to Richland in 2003, earned his master’s degree in international affairs (with a specialty in African military studies) from George Washington University and his doctorate in history from Southern Methodist University. He spent more than 30 years in the business sector as a buyer, safari outfitter, magazine editor and creative director. 

Sullivan earned his master’s degree in conservation anthropology from SMU and spent many years teaching before he received his doctorate in transatlantic history from the University of Texas at Arlington. He has taught at UTA, Texas Christian University and, most recently, at Richland College, where he serves as lead faculty member and coordinator for the anthropology department. Sullivan’s research interests focus on intercultural and interracial interactions, plus their long-term consequences.

 For more information about the event, please contact W. Marvin Dulaney at 817-406-8443 or Jane Jones at 214-565-9026, ext. 328.

(Article courtesy of Ann Hatch, Dallas County Community College District)


Military Friendly School Silver Logo Richland College Designated a Military Friendly School for Tenth Consecutive Year

Richland College has been recognized as a top college for veterans and active duty military members for the tenth consecutive year by receiving a 2019-2020 Military Friendly® Schools Silver Award. The Military Friendly® Schools program honors U.S. colleges, universities and trade schools that are doing the most to embrace America’s military service members, veterans and spouses and to dedicate resources to ensure their success in the classroom and after graduation. A silver designation means that Richland College has programs that scored within 30 percent of the tenth ranked institution within a given category.

The Veterans Services office at Richland College works with veteran students and their families to help them complete their educational goals by maximizing their military education benefits. Many resources are available through Veteran Services, including assistance with benefits, financial aid and a variety of other support services for the college’s veteran and military students, dependents and spouses.

Richland College offers eligible students and spouses NAVPA scholarships, Hazelwood and Montgomery G.I. Bill® services and opportunities, and the college also hosts events such as Military Appreciation Day, to support veterans. In addition, Richland College has many career and technical education programs designed for quick employment in the areas of business professions, computer technology, Allied Health and advanced manufacturing and engineering technology. These programs offer industry-standard training and certifications.

Military Friendly® Schools was created by Victory Media, Inc., a leading media outlet for military personnel transitioning into civilian life. To see how Richland College scored in various areas, visit www.militaryfriendly.com/schools/richland-college.

For more information about Richland College’s veteran services, visit www.richlandcollege.edu/services/veterans.


Headshot of Dr. Raghunath Kanakala Dr. Raghunath Kanakala Appointed Richland College Executive Dean for Engineering and Technology

Richland College has named Raghunath Kanakala to the position of executive dean of its School of Engineering and Technology. Kanakala’s appointment was approved by the Dallas County Community College District Board of Trustees Dec. 4, and he will assume this role in early 2019.

Kanakala currently serves as dean of technical education at Aiken Technical College in South Carolina. While there, Kanakala has overseen 12 technical education program areas, including industrial maintenance, welding, HVAC, CNC, graphics, electrical technology, radiation protection, tower, nuclear fundamentals, pre-engineering, physics and chemistry.

Prior to his current role at Aiken Technical College, Kanakala was an assistant professor in the University of Idaho – Idaho Falls College of Engineering, a research scientist and lecturer for the Inamori School of Engineering at Alfred University in New York and a graduate research and teaching assistant in the Colleges of Engineering at the University of Nevada Reno and the University of Nevada Las Vegas.

His academic leadership has included management of a $2.5 million Individuals Safety Training to Achieve Climber Credentials grant to train and place low-skilled workers, Trade Adjustment Assistance-certified workers and others in high-demand jobs in the tower industry and to reduce fatalities in the industry. He also holds a U.S. Patent in “combustion synthesis method and boron-containing materials produced therefrom,” and has developed curriculum, published 16 articles in industry journals and delivered numerous conference presentations.

At Richland College, Kanakala will provide academic leadership for the School of Engineering and Technology, which offers programs in computer information technology, computer science, cyber security, engineering, engineering technology (advanced manufacturing and electronics technology), interactive simulation and game technology, multimedia, networking/authorized training (Amazon Web Services, Cisco, Microsoft, Oracle, UNIX), photography/imaging, PC support and semiconductor manufacturing technology.

The Richland College School of Engineering and Technology also supports the Technology, Engineering and Advanced Manufacturing Center, a learning space for relevant, hands-on experience and career-focused training with leading edge, industry-quality technology for engineering and manufacturing students.

Upon entering his new role, Kanakala hopes to advance Richland College’s student success initiatives, faculty development and community partnerships, particularly regarding apprenticeships, internships, curriculum development and articulation agreements.

“I would like to increase the awareness about engineering transfer degrees,” Kanakala said. “Also, I would like to work on improving the apprenticeship models for different programs.”

“Dr. Kanakala brings proven leadership experience in engineering and technology education, and I am very excited to welcome him to Richland College as our new executive dean,” said Shannon Cunningham, Richland College executive vice president for academic affairs and student success. “I know he will continue to advance the mission, vision and strategic direction for our School of Engineering and Technology as we continue to deliver programs that meet industry demand and promote student success.”

Kanakala holds a Ph.D. and a Master of Science in Materials Science and Engineering from the University of Nevada Reno. He also earned a Master of Science in Electrical Engineering from the University of Nevada Las Vegas and a Bachelor of Electrical and Electronics Engineering from the Gandhi Institute of Technology and Management.


A group of people pose on a set of stairs together, holding a banner with Korean writing on it. Richland College Welcomes Students and Faculty from the University of Gyeongnam Geochang in South Korea

The Richland College English for Speakers of Other Languages program and Richland College Continuing Education recently welcomed 28 students and one faculty member from the University of Gyeongnam Geochang in South Korea to Richland College.

During the visit, which took place July 2-25, the students participated in English language and American culture learning experiences, comprised of integrated reading and writing courses, cultural awareness sessions, listening and speaking master skill set learning, language exposure activities and excursions.

“Part of Richland College’s vision is to build world community,” said Gabe Edgar, a co-team leader for the UGG Korean Delegation. “There are more than 1,100 international students currently learning at Richland; however, not everyone can commit to spending years away from home. This sort of program opens a middle space for our international partners, whose students want more than a few superficial days. It’s for those that want to dive into the deep end of American culture and language.”

With the Korean Peninsula being at the forefront of many news stories in recent months, the timing of this visit allowed the Richland College community the opportunity to grow in their cultural awareness as they interacted with the South Korean delegation, who in turn were able firsthand to experience American education and culture.

Each day, the South Korean students had approximately six hours of instruction in a non-traditional classroom setting. These lessons included learning line dancing, comic book creation, playing board games and holding guided conversations with American students from the Richland College Honors Program who volunteered to help. In addition, the students joined other international students at Richland College for English classes through the ESOL program, which gave them a chance to practice English with learners from other countries.

The UGG students also went on four cultural excursions during their time with Richland College. These included Fair Park for fireworks on July 4, Whole Foods for a lesson on sustainability and food, Southern Methodist University for a look at a four-year university and the Dallas Museum of Art and Nasher Sculpture Center. In addition to the four main excursions, the students were also invited to dinner in groups of four and five at American homes, not just for a home-cooked meal, but also to give the students an intimate view of American life.

“The program was an absolutely unqualified success,” said Edgar. “We received tremendously positive feedback from the students, both in person and on anonymous surveys they completed. We even had one student begin paperwork to become an international student and study nursing in the U.S. If we counted all the people who had a hand in making the program so successful, they would outnumber the 28 South Korean students by three-to-one!” said Edgar. “That sort of effort is only possible when we’re all in it together.”

This cultural and language exposure summer program was made possible by Richland College’s administrators, the School of World Languages, Cultures and Communications, the Continuing Education division, the Multicultural Center, the ESOL staff and faculty, the Health Center, the Richland College police, the Honors program, the Office of Student Life and others.

Richland College offers courses, programs and services to empower students to achieve their educational goals and become lifelong learners and global citizens, building sustainable local and world community. For more information, visit richlandcollege.edu.


illustration of hamlet classical theater actor playing character Richland College Theatre Students Receive Prestigious Internships with Shakespeare Dallas

Richland College students Lacedes Hunt and Will Frederick recently received prestigious summer internships with Shakespeare Dallas. Hunt will work with directing and Frederick will work with lighting.

“An internship with Shakespeare Dallas means that our students have the opportunity to work at one of the largest, oldest and most respected regional theatres in Dallas,” said Gregory Lush, theatre faculty member at Richland College, who will be portraying Iago in Shakespeare Dallas’ production of “Othello” this fall. “They work all summer alongside the top professionals in our field. At the end of a successfully completed internship, our students will receive personal recommendation letters.”

Internships at Shakespeare Dallas provide students the opportunity to work with top artists, designers and technicians in a professional working environment and to connect with many different theatre companies in North Texas. These unpaid internships last eight to 12 weeks and require 20-25 hours of work per week.

The Richland College Theatre program provides a well-balanced curriculum of classroom instruction and concurrent professional employment that challenges students and fosters their success in the world of drama and theatrical production. Students learn on a cutting-edge sound system and robotic lighting, giving them real-world training in all phases of production. The award-winning faculty and staff also offer in-depth classroom study and hands-on practical experience in acting, musical theatre, design and technical arts and improvisation. For more information, visit richlandcollege.edu/theatre.

Since 1971, Shakespeare Dallas has provided North Texas residents the opportunity to experience Shakespeare in a casual park setting, as well as providing cultural and educational programs to audiences of all ages. For more information, visit shakespearedallas.org.