Category Archives: Events

Four people sitting on a stage in a discussion ‘Minority Serving Institution’ Convening Attendees Gain Valuable Insight About Equity and Inclusion

In keeping with its mission of teaching, learning and community building, Richland College, in collaboration with the Asian American Native American Pacific Islander Serving Institution program, has hosted each fall since 2016 the Minority Serving Institution Convening, a conference dedicated to providing higher education professionals with tools to impact the academic success of students at minority-serving institutions. After attending the 2018 MSI Convening, “Minority Student Success: Using Data to Effect Change,” last October, many attendees left the convening with more than just insight on how to achieve minority student success: some also left with a zeal to put ideas learned into practice and provide education and encouragement for others to follow in those same footsteps.

As an MSI Student Fellow, Richland College student Camryn Morrow was nominated by a faculty member to participate in the 2018 MSI Convening. Of everything Morrow heard at the convening, one thing impacted her the most: the importance of showing empathy. “The MSI Convening helped Richland College because it emphasized that professors should go beyond just teaching¾even expressing an ounce of empathy ensures that all students have the same opportunity to succeed,” said Morrow.

Overall, Morrow was encouraged by what she learned at the MSI Convening. “I found the presentations to be reassuring,” she said. “They showed that despite what we don’t see, many things are happening behind the scenes to fix what students consider to be some of the most prevalent of issues, including race. I would highly recommend others attend a future MSI Convening to learn more.” Morrow will also be attending the 2019 MSI Convening, this time to share her experiences at the 2018 conference and as a student at Richland College.

Cassandra Himes, College Connections advisor at the College of the Mainland in Texas City, also attended the 2018 MSI Convening. Upon returning to their institution, Himes and her colleague, Stephanie Dilissio, used what they learned at the convening and put together a presentation for the COM Student Services Leadership Council to share their takeaways and actionable items. Now COM is using the practices and information Himes and Dilissio acquired to examine the college’s processes, including the way COM collects data, the need for all units at COM to collect and analyze quantitative data and the importance of initiating courageous conversations about equity, inclusive excellence and quality programs.

“After attending the MSI Convening, I have a clearer understanding of equity, inclusive excellence and quality, and how to translate those into campus practice,” said Himes. “I approach my work with the guiding question: ‘How can we, at College of the Mainland, continue to improve the way we collect and use quantitative data to design, evaluate, modify and improve programs and initiatives to address the success of minority and underserved students?’ On a personal level, the MSI Convening reignited my commitment to the statement ‘all means all.’”

Himes plans on returning to Richland College to attend the 2019 MSI Convening, and she encourages all higher education professionals to do the same.

Jennifer Baggett, professor of biology at Richland College and MSI Convening faculty program chair, said, “By working hard to provide a high-quality, free conference with nationally recognized speakers, we have created an affordable opportunity for community colleges and other minority-serving institutions to convene, collaborate and learn about research and programs in a data-focused way to improve minority student success. The feedback we’ve received from attendees has been overwhelmingly positive, especially about the quality of presenters, both invited and those selected from breakout session proposals.”

The MSI Convening provides an opportunity for educators and other higher education professionals devoted to student success to gather and participate in presentations and discussions about using data to modify and improve programs and initiatives that address the success of minority and underserved students. The 2019 MSI Convening will be at Richland College Oct. 18-19. Proposals to present are being accepted now through June 7. The MSI Convening is made possible in part through a grant from the AANAPISI program of the Department of Education.

Richland College serves as more than just the host college¾it completely plans and executes the conference each year. The planning team is led by convening chair and executive dean for the School of Social Sciences LaQueta L. Wright, faculty program chairs Baggett, Michael Puente and Rolanda Randle, and faculty logistics chair M.T. Hickman. This team identified the theme and created the structure for a four-year series of conferences, “Using Data to Effect Change”; secured funding support from community partners; invited and guided nationally recognized keynote and plenary speakers; solicited and selected breakout session proposals; oversaw the creation of the conference website, call for proposals and registration system; organized and planned facilities, food and host hotels for the convening, including the evening networking reception and breakfast and lunch on both days; and oversaw the advertising and marketing of the convening, both locally and nationally.

“As the final year of our four-year, grant-funded MSI Convening series approaches, we look forward to seeing what Richland College does from here,” added Baggett. “We have built new relationships with community colleges and four-year minority-serving institutions over the last few years, and we look forward to cementing those relationships into collaborations that lead us all forward in our efforts to improve student success through data-informed programs and initiatives.”

Holding two designations by the U.S. Department of Education as an AANAPISI and a Hispanic-Serving Institution (HSI), Richland College is one of only nine higher education institutions in the U.S. awarded the AANAPISI grant in fiscal year 2015. With 16% of Richland College’s student population comprised of Asian American and Native American Pacific Islander students and at least half demonstrating financial need, AANAPISI funding impacts many of the college’s underserved students. The program helps Richland College to increase the three-year graduation rate for AAPI students who have one or more risks to success and completion, such as financial need or academic challenges.

For more information about the 2019 MSI Convening, visit www.richlandcollege.edu/msi-convening.


Two dancers perform ballet on a dark stage. Richland College Dance Program Presents ‘Illumination’ Spring Dance Concert

What makes you shine? Together with guest choreographers and dancers, the Richland College dance program is asking that question and will be celebrating the collective, vibrant glow of our unique inner lights during its spring concert, “Illumination,” with performances at 12:30 and 7:30 p.m. April 5.

“Illumination” will feature student dancers and professional guest performances and choreography in the dance genres of contemporary modern, jazz, tap and hip-hop, and it is directed by Richland College dance director Gina Sawyer. When work began on this performance, Sawyer invited the dancers and choreographers to imagine and create pieces that reflected his or her own individual take on the subject, and the theme began to evolve and take shape into the idea of hope and light in a world of individuality.

“Our theme of ‘illumination’ is about the individual light that each one of us carries and contributes to the world,” said Cheryl Callon, dance faculty member at Richland College. “That light is important, even among the billions of other lights on our planet.”

Dance choreography and film work will include original pieces by Callon, Cooper Delgado, Lauren Schieffer-Holley and guest choreographer Laura Pearson. Featured guest performers include Dark Circles Dance Company, directed by Joshua L. Peugh, and Choreo Records Tap Company, directed by Keira Leverton.

A dancer, teacher and choreographer, Pearson trained at the Texas Ballet Theater School, attending numerous summer intensives with companies such as Hubbard Street Dance Chicago, Texas Ballet Theater and Dallas Black Dance Theater. Her professional dance credits include Ballet Dallas, Dallas Neo-Classical Ballet, Bruce Wood Dance Project, a tour of China with Art.if.Act Dance Project, 6 O’clock Dance Theatre, Zion Dance Project and Wanderlust Dance Project.

Dark Circles Contemporary Dance was founded in 2010 in Seoul, South Korea. The company’s Dallas branch is led by Peugh, an international award-winning choreographer and one of Dance Magazine’s “25 to Watch.” Dark Circles has been hailed by the Ft. Worth Star-Telegram as “the area’s most exciting dance company” and awarded “Best Dance Company” by D Magazine and the Dallas Observer. Since its inception, the company has performed both nationally and internationally.

Leverton comes from a dance background—her grandfather was Buster Cooper, an influential tap dancer who founded the dance program at the Hockaday School. Much of her exposure to the tap community was through tap festivals such as the Chicago Human Rhythm Project and the Third Coast Rhythm Project, and she trained with a variety of professionals, including Gregory Hines and Yuji Uragami. Leverton has performed worldwide at venues such as Radio City Music Hall and Wembley Stadium in London.

The Richland College dance program provides a challenging teaching and learning environment for students who value diversity. The program develops artistic excellence, fosters creative and collaborative practices and encourages personal agency and social responsibility in appreciating dance.

“Illumination” is free and open to the public in the Fannin Performance Hall on the east side of the Richland College campus. Richland College is located at 12800 Abrams Road. Additional information is available at www.richlandcollege.edu/dance.


exterior of Richland College Garland Campus Richland College Garland Campus to Host Community College and Career Fair March 28

To further Richland College’s mission of teaching, learning and community building, Richland College Garland Campus is partnering with Workforce Solutions Greater Dallas to host a community college and career fair from 10 a.m. to noon Thursday, Mar. 28. This event is free and open to the public.

This event is designed to serve the Garland community, particularly those individuals looking to further their education or career. Individuals looking for new careers or additional education can learn about some of the offerings at Richland College Garland Campus, including its workforce training programs designed for quick employment. For job hunters, local employers will be present to accept applications and résumés from job seekers. Participating employers include BBVA, Don Miguel, Kraft Heinz, Kroger, Point to Point Security, Precision Employment, State Farm, Televista Call Center, UPS and Waffle House.

In addition, community services will be on-hand at the event to assist the community. The North Texas Food Bank’s mobile pantry will be distributing food beginning at 9 a.m., Prism Health North Texas will be providing free HIV and HCV screening, and Dallas County Health and Human Services will be providing free meningitis shots. To receive a meningitis shot, a form of government-issued identification will be required, along with shot records from a doctor.

Richland College Garland Campus is located at 675 W. Walnut St. in Garland. Richland College Garland Campus is a community campus focused on workforce training and development and corporate service and is a place for area companies, organizations and individuals to obtain highly specialized, in-demand corporate and workforce training. For information, visit www.richlandcollege.edu/garlandcampus.


vials of vaccines Richland College to Host Annual Health Professions Information Days Mar. 25-28

Richland College will host its annual Health Professions Information Days, an opportunity for students to learn about various health professions careers, Mar. 25-28.

Participants will learn about various health professions careers, including nursing, medicine, dentistry and more. More than 40 guest speakers will be presenting and available to answer questions, including practicing doctors, health occupations advisors and recruiters and more.

Health Professions Information Days will take place on the Richland College campus, located at 12800 Abrams Rd. in Dallas. Sessions will take place in Sabine Hall unless otherwise noted on the schedule. The schedule of events is as follows:

Monday, Mar. 25:
10-11 a.m., room SH118: Russell Canham, M.D., “The Path to Medicine: Getting Accepted into Medical Field of Dreams” Dr. Canham is a cardiologist, practicing in the Methodist Healthcare System of Hospitals.

11:15 a.m.-12:15 p.m., room SH118: Dr. Scott Wright, “The Basics of Admission to Medical or Dental School.” Dr. Wright is the executive director of Texas Medical & Dental Schools Application Service, and he will answer the following questions: What is the timeline for applying and getting admitted to medical or dental school? Who gets admitted? What are their GPAs? Their MCAT or DAT scores?

12:45-2:05 p.m., room SH118: “Transferring into 4 year schools & for future entry into medical, dental and other health professions graduate programs”
Health occupations advisors:
University of Texas at Dallas – Dr. Karen De Olivares, Director of Health Professions Advising
University of North Texas – Dr. Debrah Beck, Health Professions Director
Dallas Baptist University – Dr. Curtis Lee, Professor of Biology & HP Advisor
SMU – Pamela McNulty, MS, MT(ASCP), Director, Office of Pre-Health Advising

Tuesday, Mar. 26:
11 a.m.-12:20 p.m., room SH118: “Focus on Careers in Nursing”
Associate degree in nursing (A.D.N.):
Brookhaven College – Dr. Mark Meyer, Dean of Nursing, Brookhaven College
Collin College – Cathleen Rangel, Nursing Retention Recruiter

Bachelor of Science degree in nursing (B.S.N)
Texas Women’s University – Rekha Nair, Academic Adviser for Nursing
U.T. Tyler – Kleanthe Caruso, R.N., nursing faculty
U.T. Arlington – Courtney Jackson, Academic Advisor for nursing Baylor University (Dallas) – Elaine Lark, Coordinator of Recruitment and Enrollment

12:30-2 p.m., room SH118: Kassidy James, M.P.A.S, Assistant Professor in Physician Assistant Studies, and Veronica Coleman, M.P.A.S, PA-C, Assoc. Clinical Coordinator/Admissions Co-Chair UT Southwestern School of Health Professions, ”Being an Outstanding Applicant in Competitive Health Professions Programs.” How you present yourself in an interview or in a personal essay might affect your chances of getting into a program. Learn how to compete with other applicants effectively.

2:15-3:15 p.m., room SH118: Medical, Osteopathic and Dental Schools Panel
UT Southwestern Medical School – Leah Schouten, Associate Director of Student Recruitment Services
UNT/College of Osteopathic Medicine – Dr. Mike Kennedy, Director of Admissions
Texas A & M College of Dentistry – Dr. Barbara Miller, Executive Director & Assoc. Professor
Texas A & M Health Science Center, College of Medicine – Filo Maldonado, Assistant Professor and Assoc. Dean of Admissions, Texas A&M Health Science Center Medical School
UNT Health Science Center – Dr. Patricia A. Gwirtz, Associate Dean & Professor, Graduate School of Biomedical Science

5:40-7 p.m., room SH118: Dr. Eddie Mercado, Pharm. D., “The World of Pharmacy–Choices in Occupations.” Dr. Mercado is a clinical pharmacist at Children’s Hospital in the emergency department.

Wednesday, Mar. 27:
10-11:15 a.m., room SH117: Panel: The Diversity of Health Professions
Prosthetics & Orthotics – Miguel Mojica, C.P.O., L.P.O., UT Southwestern Medical Center
Intra-operative Neuromonitoring – Laura Parsons, B.S., C.N.I.M., Director of Corporate Strategy and Business Development for Texas Intra-operative Monitoring, Inc.
Public Health – Beth Hargrove, Director of Admissions, UNT Health Science Center
Respiratory Therapy – Jennifer De la Garza, RRT, Clinical Coordinator, El Centro College

10-11:15 a.m., Crocket Hall, room C110: Clinical Nutrition & Dental Hygiene
UT Southwestern – Lona Sandon, Director of the Master of Clinical Nutrition Coordinated Program, Assistant Professor in Dietetics
Texas A&M Health Science Center College of Dentistry – Leigh Ann Wyatt, BSDH, MA, MS, Clinical Associate Professor, Program Director

10-11:15 a.m., SH118: Physician Assistant Vic Holmes, MPAS, CPC, PA-C, UNT Health Science Center, instructor in PA Studies program

11:15 a.m.-12:30 p.m.: Student Panel Discussion: Students and graduates from various health professions programs in the DFW area will talk about their respective occupational fields.

12:45-2 p.m., room SH117: Panel: The Diversity of Health Professions
Emergency Medical Tech/Paramedic – David Diaz, EMT-Paramedic, Dallas Fire-Rescue
Clinical Lab Sciences – Dr. LeAnn Hutson, MLS (ASCP), Asst. Professor & Director of Medical Laboratory Sciences, Tarleton state University
Nurse midwifery – Jennifer Woo, PhD, CNM, WHNP, Clinical Assistant Professor in the Louise Harrington School of Nursing, Baylor Nurse Midwifery Program

12:45-2 p.m., Crockett Hall, room C110: Occupational therapy and Physical Therapy
UT Southwestern – Dr. Beth Deschenes, PT, DPT, OCS, Vice-Chair/Head of Admissions Committee
Mountainview College – Dr. Candice Freeman, OTD, MOT, OTR, Director of Occupational Therapy Assistant Program

12:45-2 p.m., room SH118: Imaging Technology Fields
Brookhaven College, Radiologic Technology – Sharon Watson, R.T., faculty
UT Southwestern Medical Center, Radiation Therapy – DeAnn Klein, faculty
El Centro College, Sonography – Pam Crawford, RDMS, RT, Clinical Coordinator/Faculty El Centro College – Joan A. Becker, ARRT(R)(MR), MRI Program Coordinator/Faculty

Thursday, Mar. 28:
9:30-10:50 a.m., room SH117: Samer Ismail, “Standardized Tests for the Health Professions” (PCAT, MCAT, GRE, DAT, OAT, NCLEX). Ismail is a Kaplan presenter and content developer for MCAT 2015.

11 a.m.-12:30 p.m., room SH117: Pharmacy
UNT College of Pharmacy – Casandra Castillo Luna, Recruitment/Admissions Pharmacy School
UT Tyler – Jenny Engel Nelson, Graduate Program Representative for College of Pharmacy
Texas Tech Univ. Health Science Center – Sara Innis, Assistant. Director of Recruitment. School of Pharmacy
Richland Pharmacy Technician Program – Tiffani Neubal Johnson, Director of College Programs in Allied Health

For more information, call 972-238-6248.


Preview Day Richland College Preview Day on Feb. 23 a Chance for Potential Students and Their Parents to Learn About Richland College


Thank you all who attended the February Preview Day. We will be hosting the next Preview Day in the Fall on Saturday, November 2, 2019. We will keep you posted as more details are available.

Future Thunderducks and their parents are invited to learn about educational opportunities and campus life during Preview Day at Richland College, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 23, 2019. This event is free, though event registration is encouraged.

Visitors are welcome to check in at any point between 10 a.m. and 1 p.m., with a variety of information sessions and campus tours running from 10:30 a.m.-1:20 p.m. A free lunch will be available at noon for registered participants. Information session topics include college success, job outlook, admissions processes, student services offered at Richland College, credit and noncredit college programs and more.

Academic program coordinators will be available to answer questions during the sessions, and students will be able to complete and submit an admission application on-site. In addition, representatives from various student services areas such as the Multicultural Center, Transfer Center, Career Services, Disability Services and more will explain how these services can assist student success at Richland College.

“Preview Day at Richland College is an excellent opportunity for future students not only to see our beautiful campus and learn about all the great programs and services we offer, but also to imagine him or herself as a Thunderduck,” said Janita Patrick, dean of student services at Richland College. “This is a great event for students and parents to come by, ask questions and allow us to assist them in the process of enrolling in college.”


An aerial, black and white image of the northeast corner of Little Egypt in 1962. Dallas’ Lost Neighborhood, “Little Egypt,” is Focus of Free Presentation at African American Museum

When Richland College faculty members Clive Siegle and Tim Sullivan started collaborating on the joint project “Finding Little Egypt,” little did they know how far they and their students would delve into the history and anthropology of a Dallas neighborhood which disappeared decades ago.

The history of that missing community and where its residents went will be the subject of a free presentation by Siegle and Sullivan on Sat., Feb. 9, at the African American Museum of Dallas. “Lost and Found: Little Egypt, Fifty Years Later,” which starts at 1 p.m. in the museum’s AT&T auditorium, is free and open to the public. 

Siegle, the historian, lives on the cusp of the long-lost neighborhood, but the significance of that location wasn’t apparent until he noticed a subtle difference between the curb and streets of a nearby shopping center and the rest of his neighborhood.

Siegle started checking with his own neighbors and learned that the shopping center sat on the site of a black community whose residents and homes disappeared almost overnight in the 1960s. Founded by a former slave, Little Egypt was located on 30 acres of land along Northwest Highway – an area currently known as the Lake Highlands neighborhood of Dallas.

The rest, as they say, is history – and a past that the Richland College professor and his colleague began to track down and document three years ago. 

“We are excited to share our findings and the history of Little Egypt with the Dallas community,” said Siegle. “Preserving history is critical, and we want people to learn more about African American communities like Little Egypt. It’s particularly fitting that we are sharing our work at the African American Museum during Black History Month. With our students’ help and the support of family members who lived in Little Egypt, the project will continue to expand as we document the history of that community.”

Little Egypt, during its heyday, thrived for 80 years – even without city services and paved streets which surrounding neighborhoods enjoyed – and then almost mysteriously disappeared overnight in 1962 when a developer became interested in the tract of land. More than 200 residents sold their homes and moved out at the same time, using 37 moving vans; the neighborhood was torn down almost immediately.

Who were those residents? Where did they go? Where could Siegle and Sullivan start to trace the neighborhood’s history and relocation? Those are the questions that Richland College students have been working on with their professors, starting with the community’s Egypt Chapel Baptist Church and nearby McCree Cemetery, using old photographs, search grids, measurements, surface artifacts and documents to do some old-fashioned detective work.

That’s the story they will tell during their presentation at the African American Museum. Siegle and Sullivan also will share their most current work: locating, charting and excavating the home of the McCoy family whose house sat on the only piece of land that was never redeveloped after the neighborhood disappeared. They also are creating a computer-generated, 3-D model of the home.

Members of the McCoy family have been instrumental in assisting with the Little Egypt project, said Siegle, as well as providing crucial information about life in the settlement during the years prior to its demise.

Siegle, who came to Richland in 2003, earned his master’s degree in international affairs (with a specialty in African military studies) from George Washington University and his doctorate in history from Southern Methodist University. He spent more than 30 years in the business sector as a buyer, safari outfitter, magazine editor and creative director. 

Sullivan earned his master’s degree in conservation anthropology from SMU and spent many years teaching before he received his doctorate in transatlantic history from the University of Texas at Arlington. He has taught at UTA, Texas Christian University and, most recently, at Richland College, where he serves as lead faculty member and coordinator for the anthropology department. Sullivan’s research interests focus on intercultural and interracial interactions, plus their long-term consequences.

 For more information about the event, please contact W. Marvin Dulaney at 817-406-8443 or Jane Jones at 214-565-9026, ext. 328.

(Article courtesy of Ann Hatch, Dallas County Community College District)


Many red ceramic poppies are displayed, "planted" in the ground. Richland College to Honor Veterans Day with ‘The Blood of Heroes Never Dies’ Poppy Exhibit Rededication

For several weeks in November 2015, Richland College was home to a sea of red ceramic poppies—5,171 to be exact—one poppy for every Texas soldier killed in World War I. A lone white poppy represented the single Texas nurse who also perished. This year, Richland College is honoring Veterans Day with a rededication of its poppy exhibit, “The Blood of Heroes Never Dies,” at noon Nov. 12 on the east side of Lake Thunderduck near Fannin Hall.

The original exhibit was dedicated during Richland College’s 2015 Veterans Day ceremony. After being on display on campus, some of the ceramic poppies traveled to Georgetown, Tex., where they were installed as part of the city’s annual Red Poppy Festival. The poppies were offered for sale in both Dallas and Georgetown for $10 each, with proceeds donated to Puppies Behind Bars, a nonprofit group that trains inmates to raise service dogs for wounded veterans. The organization received more than $25,000 from the poppy sales.

Since 2015, a small collection of the original poppies has been on permanent exhibit at Richland College. This year, students created 100 new poppies to replace those that have broken, and veterans will symbolically plant these fresh poppies in the display during this year’s Veterans Day event.

The permanent display, a striking patch of red along the lake that flows through campus with a recently installed plaque explaining its significance, has elicited both curiosity and pride when students, campus visitors and community members discover the meaning behind it. It is pride and the belief in the importance of this display that have inspired the volunteers who helped create the new poppies and who will be giving their time at the rededication event.

“In 2015, ‘The Blood of Heroes Never Dies’ challenged the Richland community to create a memorial honoring Texas soldiers killed in World War I,” said ceramics faculty member Jen Rose. “This educated the participants about the historical importance of the war and allowed people of different backgrounds, ethnicities and ages to share an experience together. In the process of uniting to honor veterans, we discovered our humanity and remembered their sacrifice.”

“I wanted to volunteer in the ‘Blood of Heroes Never Dies’ event because I wanted to help everyone understand the things we take for granted each day,” said Jesus Porras, Richland College graduate and administrative clerk for Richland College Veterans Services. “We wouldn’t be here if it was not for the brave women and men that take an oath to serve the country in protecting us from threats to our union. These poppies that we plant here are a sign of remembrance and hope.”

“The Blood of Heroes Never Dies” was a collaboration between Rose and history professor Clive Siegle. The original exhibit was the only one of its kind in the U.S. and was modeled after the iconic “Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red” poppies exhibit at the Tower of London in 2014, during which 888,246 ceramic red poppies were on display in the tower’s moat to commemorate the British and colonial servicemen killed in World War I.

“The genesis of the symbolic connection of the poppy with commemorating veterans arose from a 1915 World War I poem, ‘In Flanders Fields,’ which emphasized poppies in its theme, and has become one of the most well-known war poems to emerge from any modern conflict,” said Siegle. “The 2015 ‘Blood of Heroes’ project was meant not only to honor veterans of all wars, but to coincide with a centenary anniversary year of both World War I, and the year the Flanders Fields poem with its iconic poppy references was written. This year has particular significance for revisiting and reaffirming the ongoing vision of the ‘Blood of Heroes’ project because this Veterans Day marks the one hundredth anniversary of the end of that war, which cost this nation more than 323,000 casualties, and this state 5,171 of its heroes.”

Remembrances or memorial poppies have been used since 1921 to commemorate soldiers who have died in wars. “In Flanders Fields” was penned by Lt. Col. John McCrae. Regretfully, McCrae did not survive the war and perished in January 1918. However, his poem lived on and inspired YMCA volunteer and teacher Moina Belle Michael always to remember those who died in the war and to write her pledge in the form of a poem, “We Shall Keep the Faith.” Rose and Siegle chose the passage from the ninth line of Michael’s poem, “The blood of heroes never dies,” as the theme for this memorial art installation project.

In addition to the rededication of “The Blood of Heroes Never Dies,” Richland College will be honoring Veterans Day with several other events. These include: a Richland Wind Symphony Tribute Concert, 11 a.m. Nov. 9 in El Paso Hall on the cafeteria stage; “Thank-A-Vet” card party, during which participants create thank you cards for veterans, 2 p.m. Nov. 12 in El Paso Hall student lounge area; and a benefits chat hosted by Richland College Veterans Services, 2 p.m. Nov. 14 in El Paso Hall, room E081. All events are free and open to the public.

Richland College is located at 12800 Abrams Rd. For more information about Richland College Veterans Services, visit www.richlandcollege.edu/services/veterans.


Two students dance in the fall 2017 Richland College production of "Thriller" Richland College Dance Program Presents ‘DANCE–Take a Walk on the Wild Side!’ Fall Dance Concert

The Richland College dancers may not have moves like Jagger, but they will have moves like jaguars! The fur will be flying at the upcoming fall dance concert, “DANCE—Take a Walk on the Wild Side!,” at 12:30 and 7:30 p.m. Friday, Nov. 2.

Directed by Richland College dance director Gina Sawyer, “DANCE—Take a Walk on the Wild Side!” will involve both students and faculty in choreography and performance roles, with dance genres including contemporary modern, lyrical, jazz, tap and hip-hop.

“DANCE—Take a Walk on the Wild Side!” is a creative endeavor to bring awareness and to inspire a passion for nature and wildlife with a zoological theme, and audiences are invited to attend and engage in a “zoo-rific” opportunity to appreciate dance.

Choreography will include original pieces by Cheryl Callon, Cooper Delgado, Kaley Jensen and Lauren Schieffer-Holley. Repertoire will include a tap piece from Dallas legend Buster Cooper, recreated by his granddaughter, guest artist Keira Leverton and performance by her company Choreo Records. Guest artists include Kaley Jensen and Dallas Black Dance Theater’s Encore!

Leverton comes from a dance background—her grandfather was Buster Cooper, an influential tap dancer who founded the dance program at the Hockaday School. Much of her exposure to the tap community was through tap festivals such as the Chicago Human Rhythm Project and the Third Coast Rhythm Project, and she trained with a variety of professionals, including Gregory Hines and Yuji Uragami. Leverton has performed worldwide at venues such as Radio City Music Hall and Wembley Stadium in London.

Jensen was born and raised in Atlanta and graduated from Brigham Young University with a major in dance and minor in business. While at BYU, Jensen performed and toured with the Theatre Ballet Company all four years. Jensen has trained on multiple scholarship programs, including the San Francisco Conservatory of Dance and Ballet West, as well as achieving academic and international talent awards at the World Dance Movement in Italy. Last May, Jensen completed her M.F.A. in dance at the University of Arizona, where she also deepened her passion for performing, educating and choreographing. Currently, Jensen dances professionally as a company member with Ballet North Texas.

Dallas Black Dance Theater’s Encore!, under the direction of Nycole Ray, is a professional company that consists of eight aspiring artists from around the nation. Since its inception, Encore! has grown in popularity and thrilled audiences with its fresh allure. Encore! provides an opportunity for young artists to develop their dance skills while serving the Dallas/Ft. Worth community and touring around the world with dance performances of the highest artistic quality.

The Richland College dance program provides a challenging teaching and learning environment for students who value diversity. The program develops artistic excellence, fosters creative and collaborative practices and encourages personal agency and social responsibility in appreciating dance.

“DANCE—Take a Walk on the Wild Side!” is free and open to the public in the Fannin Performance Hall on the east side of the Richland College campus. Richland College is located at 12800 Abrams Road.


Two students hold a "special event" sign on the Richland College campus. Richland College Hosts Inaugural Homecoming with Events from Oct. 27-Nov. 9

Richland College is hosting an inaugural homecoming celebration, which will offer events from Oct. 27-Nov. 9 for current students and employees, alumni and the community. The various events will include live music, a dance performance, an alumni workshop, basketball games and more.

“Richland College Homecoming Week is a wonderful opportunity for more than 45,000 alumni to come back to our beautiful campus and see their old friends and favorite professors,” said Garth Clayton, Richland College dean of resource development. “We’re also offering some terrific events at no cost to our alumni. On Nov. 1, we will host leaders from local companies coming to help Richland College alumni learn the best strategies for resumes and interviews. These are experts who know how getting a job—or a better job—really works. And on Nov. 2, it’s ‘Let’s Dance!’—a brilliant performance by our current dance students.”

Richland College’s Homecoming 2018 is part of the Dallas County Community College District’s first district-wide Homecoming. To launch the festivities, DCCCD is hosting a Homecoming Kick-Off Celebration/Block-Party from 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Oct. 27 at Eddie Deen’s Ranch, located at 944 S. Lamar St. in Dallas. This free event is open to the community and will include music, games, food trucks, door prizes and more.

The two alumni-specific events at Richland College are “Creating Your New Career: Richland College Alumni Workshop” from 5-8 p.m. Nov. 1 in El Paso Hall, and “Let’s Dance Alumni ‘Night Out’ Engagement Event” from 6-9 p.m. Nov. 2 in Fannin Performance Hall.

The alumni workshop will feature industry executives who will show attendees how to make a best impression on paper through resumes, cover letters and in-person interviews. Attendees will also learn about Richland’s free job resources.

The dance event will be a chance for alumni and Richland College professors to connect and engage. The night will start with a reception and meet and greet from 6-7:15 p.m., which will include a light meal. Afterward, everyone is invited to the “Take a Walk on the Wild Side!” dance performance, starting at 7:30 p.m. An R.S.V.P. for both events is required to Regina Harris, development assistant at Richland College, at ReginaHarris@dcccd.edu.

Other Homecoming 2018 events include: Richland Steel Sound Steel Band, from 11 a.m.-noon Oct. 31 on the cafeteria stage; Richland Jazz Combos, from noon-1 p.m. Nov. 1 on the cafeteria stage; men’s basketball: Thunderducks vs. IQ Hoops, at 6 p.m. Nov. 5 in the gymnasium; men’s basketball: Thunderducks vs. Texas Wesleyan JV, at 6 p.m. Nov. 6 in the gymnasium; Richland Fusion Band and Jazz Improv Ensemble, from noon-1 p.m. Nov. 8 on the cafeteria stage; Richland Wind Symphony Veterans Day Tribute Concert, from 11 a.m.-noon Nov. 9 on the cafeteria stage; and the DCCCD Sustainability Summit, from 8 a.m.-4 p.m. Nov. 9 in locations throughout campus.

Click here for additional information on all homecoming events.


Illustration of locks that appear digital in nature Richland College to Host BSidesDFW, Information and Technology Unconference, Nov. 3

Security BSides Dallas – Fort Worth, an information security and technology unconference, will take place at Richland College from 8 a.m.-6 p.m. Nov. 3 in Sabine Hall. This free event is organized through the cooperation of BSidesDFW, corporate sponsorships and volunteers from the hacker/maker communities.

BSides DFW fosters communication and collaboration while increasing the level of involvement and investment in the information security field. This unconference explores the fringe of information security conversations and highlights the next big thing. This event will include two speaker tracks covering various security and technology related topics. Activities include instructional workshops, a Capture-the-Flag competition and a hacker scavenger hunt.

BSidesDFW is a nonprofit organization that prepares professionals and the public with applicable data to mitigate the ever-increasing number of information security threats that permeate our modern lives. BSidesDFW’s participants are comprised of current and budding information security professionals, business executives, industry thought leaders, hobbyists and those simply curious about the hacker community. For more information, visit bsidesdfw.com.

The Richland College cyber security program brings the latest technology and a vendor-neutral education where instructors break away from traditional information technology training methods. For more information, click here.