Category Archives: Award/Honors

Ashlynn Norris poses, wearing a Richland College lanyard and a NASA t-shirt. Richland College Student Accepted Into NASA Community College Aerospace Scholars Program

Reaching for the stars is a normal part of life for Richland College honors student Ashlynn Norris, who was recently chosen as a NASA Community College Aerospace Scholar. This hardworking young woman joined other community college STEM students from across the country in getting an authentic NASA experience.

“I felt breathlessly excited when I found out I was chosen as an NCAS,” said Norris. “I have always dreamed of being involved in a NASA program, but I generally believed that it wasn’t attainable. Seeing that email was a confirmation that I could maybe have a chance to pursue things I always believed were out of reach.”

As an NCAS student, Norris had the opportunity to engage in research and learning opportunities with NASA during a five-week online course that ended July 3. During the course, students learned about NASA’s past, present and future missions, as well as the science, technology and engineering that happen behind the scenes.

“In the last five years, we’ve only had one other NASA Community College Aerospace Scholar,” said Kathleen Stephens, Richland College Honors Program coordinator. “It is a very competitive program that requires an application and letters of recommendation. As we seek to increase the number of women in STEM fields, I’m particularly excited for Ashlynn to have this opportunity.”

Norris and the other students heard from NASA subject matter experts, including Stu McClung, project planning manager for the Orion program; Trent Smith, project manager for VEGGIE, the in-orbit garden on the ISS; and Lisa Spence, a manager in NASA’s Human Research Project.

“These talks have been wonderful because neither Stu nor Trent were linear, normal students,” said Norris. “They both had a very interesting road to NASA and offered a lot of hope and wisdom to those who aren’t standard students, showing that anyone can participate in NASA if they work for it.”

Upon course completion, qualifying students are invited to tour a NASA facility and work with NASA scientists and engineers on-site. The students will visit NASA space center nearest them and participate in a four-day on-site study of the current Moon to Mars campaign. During this trip, students will attend lectures with current engineers, research tasks and complete challenges.

“I am most excited about the opportunities that this experience can give me,” added Norris. “I am blown away with how welcoming, enthusiastic and driven every single NASA employee I’ve interacted with is, and they’ve made a point to tell everyone that there is a place for anyone here, making sure that we understand we’re welcome. Being an NCAS student comes with opportunities down the line as well.”

Norris told her Richland College Honors Program advisors about a project some former NCAS student researchers spearheaded, in which a payload of micro-algae was sent to the International Space Station for a week to see how the plant would respond under stress. The plant produces a powerful antioxidant that NASA believes may be able to help fight the heavy strain on astronauts’ bodies while in micro-gravity. NASA has agreed to ship samples of this algae to Richland College’s biology department to be studied by students to see how micro-algae grown in space differs structurally.

“Ashlynn is new to the Honors Program, but she has already excitedly shared a way to enrich the program by giving us information about space algae that could potentially be used in an honors science classroom and for the science boot camp led by Dr. Dwight Randle,” said Stephens.

Upon graduating Richland College, Norris plans to transfer to UT Dallas to pursue a bachelor’s degree in software engineering. She has always been intrigued by artificial intelligence and the advancement of the exploration of space, and she hopes to have the opportunity to work with NASA one day.

“No one should give up on themselves just because they may be a non-linear, busy or working student,” said Norris. “It is never too late to pursue things that you love, and Richland College and NCAS have done a wonderful job of reminding me of that.”

The Richland College Honors Program provides highly qualified students with an enriched and challenging academic community where they develop the capabilities necessary to excel in their educational and career goals. In May 2019, 24 students with the Richland Honors Scholar designation and 24 additional students with the Richland Honors Certificate designation graduated from Richland College. Learn more about the Richland College Honors Program at https://www.richlandcollege.edu/cd/instruct-divisions/rlc/mshp/honors-program/pages/default.aspx.

NCAS gives community college STEM students an authentic NASA experience and encourages them to finish their degrees and eventually pursue a NASA-related career. Eligible students must be U.S. citizens, high school graduates or equivalent, at least 18-years-old, registered at a U.S. community college, have concurrent enrollment or completion of 9 or more hours of STEM coursework and able to commit to a five-week online session. More information is available at nas.okstate.edu/ncas/.


Headshot of Rose Galloway Richland College Administrator Selected for Prestigious Leadership Fellows Program

Rose Galloway, associate vice president for workforce and continuing education at Richland College, has been selected as a 2019 Fellow to the National Community College Hispanic Council Leadership Development Program.

Galloway has been in her role at Richland College since 2015, and she has worked to enhance the success of the college’s career and technical education programs and Continuing Education through her strategic leadership.

“This opportunity has been the single most impactful thing I have ever done in my professional career,” said Galloway. “I feel so validated and surrounded by community.”

“I am very proud that Ms. Galloway was selected for this competitive leadership program, and I know she will greatly value from this experience,” said Shannon Cunningham, executive vice president for academic affairs and student success at Richland College. “Associate Vice President Galloway continues to be a leader among her peers and in the community, and I know this opportunity will continue to allow her to grow in not just her role at Richland College, but also in her leadership strength.”

Galloway is one of 24 members of the 2019 fellows class selected from community college candidates around the country. Hosted by the University of San Diego School of Leadership and Education Sciences, this prestigious program is designed to develop a pool of highly qualified Latinos and Latinas whose career interests focus on assuming increasingly responsible administrative positions with the goal of becoming community college presidents. The NCCHC Leadership Fellows Program was selected as a finalist in the 2019 “Examples of Excelencia” national showcase.

“Preparing strong leaders for the future is the primary purpose of the National Community College Hispanic Council’s Leadership Fellows Program,” said NCCHC president Robert Vela. “A demographic shift is occurring in the United States, and we are preparing new leaders who can model the way for the growing Hispanic population our community colleges serve. Through this program, fellows gain the necessary knowledge and skills they need to lead higher education into the future and positively impact the economic and civic success of their respective communities.”

“I feel an even stronger call to action to serve the students in our local community and to focus on the true and emerging needs of those in unique or underserved populations,” Galloway said.

Galloway earned her bachelor’s degree in psychology in 1993 from Indiana University and received her master’s in education from the University of Houston in 1995. In addition to her role at Richland College, she is also the current chairwoman of the board for the Garland Chamber of Commerce.

NCCHC Fellows are required to attend two residential training seminars. The first begins in June, while the Fellows are in residence at USD. Galloway and the other Fellows will each prepare an individualized professional development plan and engage in a mentoring relationship with a Hispanic community college leader. In addition, they will attend the NCCHC Leadership Symposium in the fall and carry out online activities in between sessions.

NCCHC is an affiliated council of the American Association of Community Colleges, a national organization that has provided leadership to the community college movement for the past half-century. For more than 30 years, NCCHC has worked to promote the educational interests and success of the Hispanic community and to emphasize access, equity and excellence for students and staff in community colleges. Since the program’s inception, more than 250 community college administrators have participated as Fellows. In the past two years, more than 60 former Fellows have moved to positions of increased responsibility as executive level administrators, including chancellors, vice-chancellors and presidents. Learn more about the Fellows program at www.ncchc.com/leadership-fellows-program.

For more information about Richland College’s career and technical education programs, including computer technology, business professions, allied health, engineering technology and advanced manufacturing, visit www.richlandcollege.edu/smartcareers. Information about Richland College Continuing Education is available at www.richlandcollege.edu/ce.


Headshot of Kathleen Stephens Richland College Honors Program Coordinator Kathleen Stephens Named ‘Advisor of the Year’ by National Society of Collegiate Scholars

Richland College Honors Program coordinator Kathleen Stephens was recently named Region 3 Chapter Advisor of the Year by the National Society of Collegiate Scholars. According to NSCS, she was selected for her “strong leadership and unwavering support and dedication to the NSCS Chapter at Richland College.”

Stephens is the founding advisor for the Richland College NSCS chapter, which began in spring 2015. Colleague Patrick Moore, professor in the School of Social Sciences and Wellness, is also an NSCS advisor.

“It’s been a remarkable experience to watch our NSCS chapter grow from a new honor society in spring 2015 to have it achieve Gold Star status for the first time this year from the national office,” said Stephens. “I enjoy participating in the leadership development of chapter officers and helping them learn how to handle communication, responsibility and delegation. I’m very proud of them and all that they have achieved.”

In addition to her full-time duties as Honors Program coordinator, Stephens’ responsibilities as an NSCS advisor include attending new member induction ceremonies, meetings and events sponsored by the chapter; and sharing advice with officers and members.

“Your passion and commitment for student success are evident and you go above and beyond to support the chapter and encourage chapter officers to be leaders,” said Susan Kuper, director of Chapter Advisor and Campus Relations at NCSC. “We are impressed by the student leaders of your chapter and all that they have accomplished this year.”

As part of her award, Stephens will be awarded a $150 professional stipend. Her registration fee for the Leadership Excellence and Advisor Development certification online course, offered to NSCS advisors in June 2019, will also be waived.

Founded in 1994 at the George Washington University in Washington, D.C., NSCS is a member of the Association of College Honor Societies and is a recognized organization at more than 300 campuses across the country. This nonprofit honors organization recognizes and elevates high achievers and provides career and graduate school connections, leadership and service opportunities, and awards one million dollars in scholarships annually¾more than any other honor society. For more information, visit nscs.org.

The NSCS chapter at Richland College is part of Region 3, which consists of Texas, New Mexico, Arizona, California and Hawaii. Richland’s chapter achieved Gold Star status for the first time in spring 2019, an honor that reflects the chapter’s highly engaged members. The officers have organized several community service events this year, including a mental health awareness event as part of NSCS’s partnership with Active Minds. For more information about Richland’s NSCS chapter, visit richlandcollege.edu/cd/instruct-divisions/rlc/mshp/honors-program/pages/nscs.aspx. Students who have earned at least a 3.4 GPA on 9 college-level credit hours may self-nominate to NSCS at nscs.org/self-nomination.


Four of the five Wall of Honor winners (Kirubel Moges not pictured) pose with picture frames containing their headshots and biographies. Richland Honors Five Former and Current Students at 2019 Wall of Honor Ceremony

Congratulations to the 2019 Student Wall of Honor honorees! For more information on the Richland College Student Wall of Honor, click here.

Hope Anderson

When Hope Anderson began her educational journey as a dual credit student at Richland College when she was 16-years-old, no one knew just how far she would go. Hope’s journey is a testament to the power of purpose and planning.

As one of five siblings attending Richland College, Hope was responsible for her own higher education expenses. Undaunted by this challenge, Hope got a part-time job and created an aggressive four-year university transfer strategy.

By the time Hope completed 40 hours at Richland College, she not only was a member of Phi Theta Kappa and named to the President’s Honor Roll, but she also had a number of scholarship offers from top universities. Having an interest in human rights and wanting to stay near her family, she selected Southern Methodist University.

Hope graduated from SMU in 2017 with a 3.97 GPA and three undergraduate degrees: a B.A. in Human Rights with distinction, a B.A. in History, a B.S. in Sociology and a minor in Spanish. During her four years of study at SMU, Hope earned more than $150,000 in scholarships. Some of Hope’s many accomplishments include, but are not limited to, being a John Lewis Fellow, a Fulbright semi-finalist, a 2017 recipient of the SMU “M” Award, a Humanity in Action finalist and a member of both Phi Beta Kappa and the Dedman College Scholar University Honors Program.

In addition to her educational accolades, Hope’s human rights travels have taken her to countries including Nepal, Jordan and Chile. She served as a student leader for the Death Row Facilities in the American South program and interned with the International Rescue Committee of Dallas and the International Justice Mission in Washington, D.C.

In 2018, Hope became the community outreach coordinator for SMU’s Embrey Human Rights Program, and this fall she will begin her graduate studies in the field of human rights.

 

Kirubel Moges

As a student in Richland College’s Honors Program, Kirubel Moges has been described as “fearless in his pursuit of knowledge and academic enrichment.” Instead of protecting his GPA and playing it safe, Kirubel has enrolled in honors courses in a variety of disciplines.

Kirubel grew up in Ethiopia, and when he was three-years-old his father passed away, leaving his mother to care for her three sons. The family moved into a smaller house on their property and rented out the larger main house, and it was from this rental income that the family survived.

Always having the courage to dream big, Kirubel graduated from high school in Ethiopia in 2016 and was excited to attend Richland College that fall. However, political instability in Ethiopia forced him to delay traveling for six months. He got to the U.S. just in time—his travel window to the U.S. expired only one day after he arrived in early 2017. Once on campus, Kirubel threw himself into his studies and did more than excel: he thrived.

In addition to presenting at the 2018 Richland College Honors Conference and the 2018 DCCCD Philosophy Conference, Kirubel presented research on the death penalty in the U.S. at the 2018 Great Plains Honors Council Conference, and he also became the first Richland College Honors Program student to have a poster presentation accepted at the national level by the National Collegiate Honors Council’s 2018 Conference. There, Kirubel’s presentation expanded on his previous research, utilizing computer programming and philosophy to examine interviews as a data set to find which word was most commonly said by death row inmates in their final interviews. Kirubel found the most common word was “love.”

Kirubel is also active in a variety of campus organizations, including Phi Theta Kappa, the National Society of Collegiate Scholars, the Male Achievement Program, the Philosophy Club, the Computer Club and more. He is on track to earn the Richland Honors Scholar designation when he graduates this May, the highest designation possible through the Richland College Honors Program.

 

Adeeba Muntazer

Adeeba Muntazer has a true joy for learning, and at one time in her life she risked literally everything in pursuit of an education.

Growing up in Afghanistan, Adeeba was just nine-years-old when the Taliban gained control of nearly 90 percent of the country and adopted brutal policies that forbade women from receiving an education. People who were found violating these laws were sentenced to death. Despite this risk, many female teachers who had been dismissed from their jobs rebelled and opened secretive, underground schools for girls.

As a teacher himself, Adeeba’s father knew of some of these covert schools, and he understood the value of his daughter receiving an education. At the risk of being killed for facilitating her learning, her father enrolled Adeeba in a secret school. Every day for three years, Adeeba walked jagged roads, sometimes crawling and hiding to evade authorities, to attend the facility her teachers had made into a school. She and other girls gathered in the small, dim and dank room to learn and support each other, and it was here that Adeeba completed her 5th, 6th and 7th grades.

In 2007, when Adeeba turned 18, she honored her parents’ traditions and culture with an arranged marriage, and Adeeba was accepted to study at Kabul University the same year. She balanced her studies with motherhood and caring for a large extended family. In 2009, Adeeba and her family were provided with an opportunity to immigrate to the U.S. because of her husband’s employment with the U.S. Armed Forces in Afghanistan.

Adeeba put her education on hold when she and her family moved, but in 2015 she resumed her dream and enrolled in her first ESOL class at Richland College. Since then, she has become fluent in English and has completed 58 credit hours, maintaining a 3.5 GPA. In the spring of 2018, she even earned the highest grade of her Speech 1311 class with Dr. Sherry Dean Rovelo. Adeeba has plans to soon transfer to El Centro College or Brookhaven College to complete a degree in nursing.

 

Thao Nguyen

Thao Nguyen didn’t mean to follow in her mother’s footsteps and become a nurse. But when she grew to love science through her professors at Richland College, she changed her mind, and she has been using her profession to help other people ever since.

Thao was 17-months-old when she and her parents escaped the Communist regime in Vietnam on a small fishing boat with 72 other people. The trip was harrowing and included a pirate attack in the South China Sea before they were rescued by a U.S. Navy ship. The family ended up at refugee camps in Thailand and the Philippines before moving to the U.S. Once there, Thao’s parents worked hard, and Thao’s mother graduated with an associate’s degree in nursing in 1988.

Inspired by the tenacity of her parents, Thao enrolled at Richland College before transferring to Texas Woman’s University, graduating in 2004. In addition, she was awarded for having the most community service volunteer hours and was the first in her family to earn a bachelor’s degree.

After graduation, Thao became a registered nurse with Texas Health Dallas and won multiple awards and honors, including making the 2012 Great 100 Nurses list and earning the D Magazine Nursing Excellence Award in 2013. But even though Thao has a passion for nursing, she also has a passion for helping others. Thao enrolled at Christ for the Nations Institute in 2016 as a full-time student and will graduate in 2019 with a bachelor’s degree in practical ministry with a major in creative media.

Some of Thao’s humanitarian efforts include partnering with World Relief to aid Afghan refugees in Dallas and creating ArtBark, a dog-friendly event that raises money for local nonprofits. She has also taken eight mission trips since 2012 to provide health care and take family photographs that were often a family’s first photo ever. Thao also volunteers her time to photograph babies in the NICU, documenting holidays and special occasions or taking bereavement photos to capture a baby’s final moments with his or her parents.

 

Steve Rodgers

During his tour of duty in the Vietnam War with the U.S. Air Force, Steve Rodgers found himself facing a choice when feeling overcome with emotional and physical hardships: He could focus on the bad in the world, or he could become the good and help those who suffered. He chose the latter, and his first act was teaching English to Vietnamese citizens.

Upon returning to Dallas, Steve began raising funds and promoting business investment within the Asian community. He has been instrumental in encouraging young people of Asian origin to pursue an education, even helping some of them finance their studies at Richland College.

Some of Steve’s other humanitarian contributions include: working with young addicts at the Palmer Drug Abuse Program; serving lunch at the Stewpot Ministry at the First Presbyterian Church in downtown Dallas; cofounding Restart, a program that assisted homeless and unemployed individuals affected by the recession of the 1980s; volunteering with the Eritrean refugee community in Dallas through organizing and furnishing a community center that offered services including ESL courses, job placement and legal assistance; cofounding the Dick Granger Society to help individuals and families needing assistance with housing, job placement and other necessities; and currently participating in the planning for a retreat center for battered women and children in Belize.

Steve has a degree in international trade from Texas Tech, an MBA from the University of Texas and took French classes at Richland College. Steve has used these educational pursuits to further his global service. During a dangerous mission to develop a camp in Algeria in 1996, Steve hit upon the idea of drilling for water instead of oil in impoverished areas.

Steve learned about digging and repairing wells from Living Water International. Since then, Steve has channeled his oil drilling expertise to provide potable water and teach pump repair and replacement at more than 20 sites in Ethiopia, Uganda, Haiti, Honduras, Guatemala and Belize.


Military Friendly School Silver Logo Richland College Designated a Military Friendly School for Tenth Consecutive Year

Richland College has been recognized as a top college for veterans and active duty military members for the tenth consecutive year by receiving a 2019-2020 Military Friendly® Schools Silver Award. The Military Friendly® Schools program honors U.S. colleges, universities and trade schools that are doing the most to embrace America’s military service members, veterans and spouses and to dedicate resources to ensure their success in the classroom and after graduation. A silver designation means that Richland College has programs that scored within 30 percent of the tenth ranked institution within a given category.

The Veterans Services office at Richland College works with veteran students and their families to help them complete their educational goals by maximizing their military education benefits. Many resources are available through Veteran Services, including assistance with benefits, financial aid and a variety of other support services for the college’s veteran and military students, dependents and spouses.

Richland College offers eligible students and spouses NAVPA scholarships, Hazelwood and Montgomery G.I. Bill® services and opportunities, and the college also hosts events such as Military Appreciation Day, to support veterans. In addition, Richland College has many career and technical education programs designed for quick employment in the areas of business professions, computer technology, Allied Health and advanced manufacturing and engineering technology. These programs offer industry-standard training and certifications.

Military Friendly® Schools was created by Victory Media, Inc., a leading media outlet for military personnel transitioning into civilian life. To see how Richland College scored in various areas, visit www.militaryfriendly.com/schools/richland-college.

For more information about Richland College’s veteran services, visit www.richlandcollege.edu/services/veterans.


Two photos, one of each team. Players are all posing and smiling. Richland College Men’s and Women’s Soccer Teams Both Win National Championship Honors

The Richland College men’s and women’s soccer teams won their respective National Junior College Athletic Association Division III National Championships last weekend, marking only the third time in NJCAA Division III history that a school has won the men’s and women’s national titles in the same year–records also held by Richland College in 2004 and 2006.

The men’s team traveled to Herkimer, NY, where they defeated Sussex 4-0 on Nov. 8, Genesee 7-3 on Nov. 9 and Nassau 6-1 on Nov. 11. This final win gave the men’s team their seventh national title. Their final 6-1 score against Nassau was also the largest margin of victory in a Division III championship match in NJCAA history.

The women’s team traveled to Rockford, Ill., where they defeated Holyoke 9-0 on Nov. 8, Brookdale 5-1 on Nov. 9 and Delta 1-0 on Nov. 11. This is the women’s team’s fourth national title.

Mohamed Sesay, men’s forward, was named the Tournament MVP after scoring five goals and recording an assist during the span of three games. Sesay and Mariano Fazio, defender, and Lucio Martinez, midfielder, earned spots on the All-Tournament Team. In addition, Coach Sean Worley was named Coach of the Tournament.

Miranda Ibarra, women’s defender, was named Tournament MVP, Eva Mulligan was named Offensive MVP and Dynastee Cain was named Defensive MVP. Additionally, forward Asia Revelry was named to the All-Tournament Team and Coach Scott Toups was named Coach of the Tournament.

Both Richland College men’s and women’s soccer teams have winning reputations and have traveled across the country to play in exhibition and postseason games in places like California, Kansas, New York, Chicago, New Jersey and Missouri. The men’s team has seven national championships from 2002, 2003, 2004, 2006, 2007, 2016 and 2018. For more information, visit www.richlandcollege.edu/sliferlc/athletics/mensoccer/pages/default.aspx. The women’s team has four national championships from 2004, 2006, 2009 and 2018. For more information, visit www.richlandcollege.edu/sliferlc/athletics/womensoccer/pages/default.aspx.


Shannon Cunningham, M.T. Hickman and Dwight Riley pose together, with M.T. holding her award from MPI. Richland College HEEM Lead Faculty M.T. Hickman Honored with Leadership Award from MPI DFW Chapter

M.T. Hickman, lead faculty of Richland College’s Hospitality, Exhibitions and Event Management program, was honored with the Colleen Rickenbacher Leadership Award at the 16th annual Certified Meeting Professional and Certificate in Meeting Management Recognition Event, hosted by the Dallas/Ft. Worth chapter of Meeting Professionals International April 26.

Hickman was one of three finalists for the award, and her selection was based on her impact on enhancing the relationships with meeting professionals and students in Richland College’s HEEM program. Her efforts have not only raised the visibility of the program, but she has a history of actively engaging students at industry events and encouraging them to join professional organizations and pursue industry certifications.

“M.T. is passionate about the industry and works hard to provide hands-on learning opportunities for Richland College HEEM students,” said Dwight Riley, dean of the Richland College School of Business. “She is a leader who inspires her students and colleagues to pursue their dreams.”

The Colleen Rickenbacher Leadership Award recognizes a member of the MPI Dallas/Ft. Worth chapter who makes a difference in the meetings industry through leadership contributions, commitment to education and advocacy in the cause of professional certifications.

Hickman, a CMP and Certified Protocol Etiquette and Civility Professional, is also a co-founder and current co-chair of the IMEX America and IMEX Frankfurt Faculty Engagement Programs that are part of the annual IMEX America and Frankfurt exhibitions for incentive travel, meetings and events. The Faculty Engagement Programs bring together faculty from around the world to discuss issues in meetings and events related to preparing students for careers in the industry.

In addition, for 16 years Hickman has brought together industry leaders and students to plan and produce the HEEM Scholarship Luncheon and Silent Auction, an annual event that has now raised more than $50,000 in scholarship funds for HEEM students at Richland College.

The Richland College HEEM program offers courses in the hospitality industry that prepare students for jobs as a marketing coordinator, show director, sales administrator, meeting manager, special events coordinator and event planners. Students can complete the Meetings and Events Management certificate, Hospitality and Tourism Management certificate or the Hospitality, Exhibitions and Event Management Associate of Applied Sciences degree.

MPI is the largest meeting and event industry association worldwide. Founded in 1972, MPI provides innovative and relevant education, networking opportunities and business exchanges and acts as a prominent voice for the promotion and growth of the industry. MPI has a global community of 60,000 meeting and event professionals and more than 90 chapters and clubs in 19 countries.


Charles Coldewey poses near the winning artwork with U.S. Rep. Eddie Bernice Johnson. Richland College Gallery Coordinator Selected as Jury for 2018 U.S. Congressional Art Competition

Richland College gallery coordinator Charles Coldewey was recently selected to serve on the jury for the 2018 U.S. Congressional Art Competition for the 30th Congressional District of Texas, represented by U.S. Rep. Eddie Bernice Johnson.

Richland College resides within the 30th district of Texas. Coldewey is one of five individuals from schools within Johnson’s district selected to be on the jury for the competition.

“This is both a privilege and honor to be asked to be involved, and it’s a great opportunity to represent Richland in the community,” said Coldewey. “I have a deep love for the arts, and I want to support young artists whenever possible.”

Coldewey visited Johnson’s office to judge 98 student-submitted works of art, and he was also a guest speaker at the Congressional Art Competition reception April 20 at the Morton H. Meyerson Symphony Center in Dallas.

Victoria Taylor of the Cambridge School of Dallas was selected as the grand prize winner of the competition. Cree Agent of Bishop Dunne Catholic School won second prize and Natalie Carvajal of Booker T. Washington High School finished third. As part of her prize, Taylor’s winning artwork will be displayed for one year in the Cannon Tunnel, a tunnel in Washington, D.C., connecting the Cannon House Office Building with the U.S. Capitol.

In addition to serving as gallery coordinator and teaching three-dimensional design, advanced design and sculpture classes at Richland College, Coldewey is an active member of the north Texas art community. He holds a bachelor’s degree and a master’s degree in fine arts from the University of North Texas, is on the Ft. Worth Arts Panel and is on the artist registry for Dallas and Ft. Worth.

The Congressional Art Competition began in 1982 and is an annual competition open to high school students and sponsored by the Congressional Institute. A winner is submitted from each congressional district by the district’s member of Congress.


Two Richland College Computer Information Technology Faculty Members Named Expert Level Instructors by Cisco Networking Academy

Richland College computer information technology faculty members Rod Lamb and Rich Park were recently honored by Cisco Networking Academy with the Expert Level Instructor Excellence Award, a distinction that recognizes Lamb and Park as being in the top 10 percent of the academy’s instructors globally.

Lamb, also the computer information technology program administrator, has more than 18 years of experience as a Cisco Networking Academy instructor and has been previously awarded the Expert Level Excellence Award in 2014, 2015 and 2017. In addition, he has also twice received the Advanced Level Excellence Award, recognizing the top 25 percent of instructors globally.

Park also has more than 18 years of experience as a Cisco Networking Academy instructor and was previously awarded the Expert Level Excellence Award in 2013, 2016 and 2017. He also has twice previously received the Advanced Level Excellence Award.

“It’s nice to get the recognition,” said Lamb. “I think it shows the quality of the instructional faculty we have here, and I think that’s what spoke to me the most when I got it: the level of knowledge and expertise we have at Richland College.” Lamb went on to explain that very few other colleges had more than one instructor on the list of Expert Level Excellence Award winners.

Cisco Networking Academy program awards are determined using an instructor recognition score based on several factors, including participation in regional instructor online groups; participation in Cisco professional development opportunities; attention to student needs, measured by satisfaction with lab facilitation and student interest in the courses; student performance on the first attempt of the final exam; and instructor use of Cisco resources such as assessments.

Richland College offers courses that prepare students for the Cisco Certified Networking Associate and Cisco Certified Networking Professional exams. In this training, students learn how to design, build and secure intelligent networks while developing other skills such as leadership and collaboration. The CCNA certification is a foundation-level networking certification, while the CCNP is more advanced and shows that the certificate holder has the networking expertise to meet the needs of varying IT and networking job roles.

Cisco Systems, Inc. develops, manufactures and sells networking hardware, telecommunications equipment and other high technology services and products and is the largest networking company in the world.

Cisco Networking Academy program began in 1997 when Cisco donated networking equipment to a local school, but it sat unused because no one was trained on it. Realizing this gap, Cisco stepped in and trained the staff to build their network, and Cisco Networking Academy Program grew from a single school to an ever-expanding community of students, educators, employers, non-governmental organizations, Cisco employees and customers. Cisco Networking Academy has impacted more than 7.8 million students in 180 countries, partnering with 22,000 educators and instructors at 10,400 academies.


Richland College Awarded City of Dallas Zero Waste Management Gold Level Green Business Certification

Richland College is passionate about going green, and the college has once again been recognized for its efforts. In late 2017, Richland College was awarded the City of Dallas Zero Waste Management Gold Level Green Business certification. Richland College is the first and only educational institution in the city to earn this recognition.

This certification distinguishes businesses and institutions that prevent waste, incorporate recycling and promote reuse, reduce and compost in its operations. There are three certification levels offered, and Richland College was awarded the gold level–the highest level. Richland College received this recognition for providing and tracking the recycling of 38 different materials while maintaining and monitoring an onsite waste-management program. Last year alone, Richland College recycled 485 tons.

“To be awarded the Gold Level Green Business certification through the City of Dallas Zero Waste Management offers Richland College several advantages,” said Sonia Ford, sustainability project coordinator and a member of the Dallas County Community College District Sustainability Team. “These include recycling assistance, a green business certification decal or certificate to display on our campus, permission to display this logo on our website and in other media, a listing on the city’s commercial recycling website and dallasrecycles.com and recognition at the city’s Green Business Leaders event. In addition, City of Dallas Zero Waste Management has officially posted Richland College’s certification video and content on all of its social media.”

Any business in Dallas that incorporates green practices and conserves resources can apply to become Green Business certified at either a bronze, silver or gold level. Businesses that receive this certification will save money, assist in protecting the environment and have their business recognized for its efforts in a variety of ways. The City of Dallas Zero Waste Management plan was passed in 2013, with a goal of having zero waste by 2040. For more information about The City of Dallas Zero Waste plan and Richland College’s certification, visit http://dallascityhall.com/departments/sanitation/Pages/greenbusiness.aspx.

Richland College has tracked energy consumption since 1975, and it records and assesses key performance indicators for energy and water usage and recycling. In 2010 and 2011, Richland College was awarded the Environmental Protection Agency WasteWise Award for University and College Partner of the Year. Richland College also won the national Recyclemania Grand Championship in 2016 and the Texas Grand Championship each year from 2010 to 2017. For more information about Richland College’s green initiatives, visit www.richlandcollege.edu/greenrichland.