Author Archives: Katie

Richland College’s ‘Travel, Exposition and Meeting Management’ Program Changed to ‘Hospitality, Exhibition and Event Management’

A crowd standing outside a newly opened hotel with confetti raining down.In order to better serve the needs of students, Richland College officially changed the name of its Travel, Exposition and Meeting Management (TEMM) Associate of Applied Science degree program to Hospitality, Exhibition and Event Management (HEEM), effective Jan. 1, 2018.

This change occurred after a survey was distributed to 77 students asking about intentions and goals of the program. With an 84 percent return rate, the survey determined 46 percent of students were most interested in meetings and events, 65 percent of students were interested in pursuing the Associate of Applied Science degree rather than just getting a certificate and 48 percent of students were extremely likely to pursue a career in the industry.

“The name was changed to HEEM so that potential and current students could more clearly recognize the hospitality and event management emphasis of the program,” said M.T. Hickman, HEEM lead faculty and program coordinator. “The word ‘travel’ is often associated with travel agents, who represent a very small segment of the industry. ‘Hospitality’ is a more commonly used term that includes lodging, events, tourism and recreation. This change more accurately describes the program and gives students and employers a better understanding of what we offer.”

Although the name has officially been changed for all new students, it will not affect current students in the TEMM program. In addition, the Hospitality and Tourism Management and Meetings and Event Management certificate programs will remain the same. While the travel and events courses currently offered at Richland College will not change, students will begin to see more hospitality courses added in the future.

“This program provides the education to prepare students for a career in the hospitality, events and tourism industry,” said Hickman. “The certificates build upon each other and lead to the Associate of Applied Science degree. These awards prepare students for entry-level positions in the industry. According to the U.S. Occupation Outlook, the hospitality and lodging industry is expected to grow by 6 percent, and the meetings and events industry is expected to grow by 10 percent by 2026. This program exposes students to the many segments of the industry, which will help them gain an understanding of where they would like to work and build relationships while they are in school.”

The HEEM curriculum is developed in collaboration with a 30-member advisory board whose members represent all segments of the industry. These industry professionals also teach in the HEEM program and mentor students.

Hickman started her career with the Irving Convention and Visitors Bureau and is still active in industry organizations, including the International Association of Exhibitions and Events (IAEE), Meeting Professionals International and the Professional Convention Management Association; she serves on the Hotel Association Advisory Board, the IAEE Faculty Advisory Board and the Stephen F. Austin Advisory Board; and she is co-chair of IMEX America and IMEX Frankfurt Faculty Engagement Program. Hickman has directed the Richland College HEEM program for 20 years, has developed and taught several courses in the program and is the student HEEM Club faculty advisor.

The Richland College HEEM program offers courses in the hospitality industry that prepares students for jobs as a marketing coordinator, show director, sales administrator, meeting manager, special events coordinator and event planners among other careers. Students can complete the Meetings and Events Management certificate, Hospitality and Tourism Management certificate or the Hospitality, Exhibition and Event Management Associate of Applied Sciences degree. The average college graduate makes $20,000 more each year.*

For more information about the HEEM program, click here.


Headshot of Dr. Shannon Cunningham Dr. Shannon Cunningham Appointed Richland College Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs and Student Success

Headshot of Dr. Shannon CunninghamRichland College has named Shannon Cunningham, Ph.D., to the position of executive vice president for academic affairs and student success. Cunningham’s appointment was approved by the Dallas County Community College District Board of Trustees Nov. 7, and she will assume her role Jan. 2, 2018.

Cunningham was chosen in a national search that included a review committee consisting of Richland College staff and faculty members, along with candidate forums, meet-and-greet sessions, and a college-wide survey that allowed college community members to provide candid input.

“Dr. Shannon Cunningham brings proven leadership and experience in academic and student affairs, coupled with an impressive passion for student success. I am confident that she will inspire and advance Richland College’s vision, mission, and strategic direction in her role as executive vice president,” said Kathryn K. Eggleston, Ph.D., Richland College president.

Cunningham currently serves as vice president at Northern Oklahoma College Stillwater Campus, a community college in Stillwater, Okla. In addition to advancing multiple service areas of the college, she helped ensure the success of the Northern Oklahoma College/Oklahoma State University Gateway Program, a partnership designed to recruit and prepare students for enrollment at Oklahoma State University. She also provided oversight and direction in new capital construction of a $22 million facility and in securing a multimillion dollar Department of Education Title III grant for Native American Serving Non-Tribal Institutions (NASNTI).

Prior to her current role at Northern Oklahoma College Stillwater Campus, Cunningham served at Northeastern Oklahoma A&M College (NEO) as the assistant vice president for academic affairs and director at NEO Grove and agriculture department chair. She also served as a faculty member in the agriculture department and the horse judging team coach.

“I am a passionate supporter of higher education and know the importance our work has on the lives of our students; we change lives and provide a means to opportunities that improve futures,” Cunningham said. “I am very much looking forward to being a part of the Richland team and helping ensure excellence in education, innovation and student success.”

Cunningham has a Ph.D. in agriculture education and leadership from Oklahoma State University, a Master of Education in workforce development education from the University of Arkansas, a Bachelor of Science in animal science from Oklahoma State University and an Associate of Science in agriculture from Northeastern Oklahoma A&M College.


Headshot of Gary Hensler Richland College Dean Named T.A.C.E. Regional Representative

Headshot of Gary HenslerGary Hensler, Richland College dean of continuing education and workforce training, was recently named a regional representative for the Texas Administrators of Continuing Education (TACE) for community/junior colleges.

“I am very excited to have this opportunity to serve in this role for TACE,” said Hensler. “I was elected by my peer representatives in the colleges in the north region.”

As the north region representative, Hensler will serve as the catalyst for information for Collin College, the Dallas County Community College District, Grayson County College, Navarro College, North Central Texas College, Tarrant County College, TSTC – Breckenridge, Vernon College and Weatherford College.

Hensler has worked at Richland College since July 2016. Some of his previous positions include the director of market operations for Strayer University, director of enrollment services at Academic Partnerships, the director of admissions and registrar at Grayson County College and the director of recruitment of ITT Technical Institute.

TACE is Texas’ premier professional association for individuals working in continuing education at Texas community and technical colleges. Its purpose is to promote the development of quality continuing education and workforce programs and the professional development of continuing education professionals. The association works to provide members with information about issues affecting the community/junior colleges and continuing education; to function as a representative agency on legislative and other issues regarding continuing education on behalf of community colleges; to maintain a communication network for the exchange of information and ideas; to support professionalism, integrity and quality continuing education instruction in Texas; and to support appropriate funding of Texas public community college continuing education programs.

For more information on TACE, visit taceonline.org.


Four people sitting on a stage in a discussion Creating Academic Success for Minority Students a Key Point of 2017 ‘Minority Serving Institution’ Convening Hosted at Richland College
Four people sitting on a stage in a discussion

Mike Flores, Ph.D., president of Palo Alto College (far right), hosts a panel on minority student success at the 2017 Minority Serving Institution (MSI) Convening at Richland College Oct. 21. Also on the panel were (left to right) Naomi Story, Ph.D., executive director of the National Asian Pacific Islander Council; Colette Pierce Burnette, Ed.D., president of Huston-Tillotson University; and Vincent Solis, Ph.D., senior vice president for academic and student affairs at Laredo Community College. Photo by Keenan Cobb.

Approximately 200 higher education administrators from 19 states, the Federated States of Micronesia, and the U.S. Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands attended the 2017 Minority Serving Institution (MSI) Convening, “Minority Student Success: Using Data to Effect Change,” held Oct. 20-21 at Richland College.

Hosted by Richland College in collaboration with the Asian American Native American Pacific Islander Serving Institution (AANAPISI) program, this conference provided attendees a chance to discuss effective research, initiatives and programs that impact the academic success of students at minority-serving institutions.

While a previous conference focused on best practices and innovation, this year’s MSI Convening focused on covering existing evidence and developing more robust methods for determining success of minority programs and initiatives so that colleges and universities can improve, obtain funding and effect change.

“The 2017 MSI Convening was a very successful event,” said LaQueta Wright, Ph.D., convening chair of the Richland College Planning Team for MSI Convening. “In addition to inspiring talks from higher education leaders during the opening and plenary sessions, small group breakout sessions provided detailed examples of how to design programs from a data-informed perspective, how to evaluate programs in a quantitative way, and success stories of students impacted by programs at colleges across the nation and even as far away as the Pacific islands. The convening also provided opportunities to network and build collaborative relationships with participants from more than 60 different colleges, universities and higher education organizations.”

The event began on Friday with a keynote address from Mike Flores, Ph.D., president of Palo Alto College in San Antonio. A Del Rio native, Flores holds a doctorate degree in educational administration from the University of Texas at Austin. He currently serves as an Achieving the Dream data coach and a board member for the Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities, Communities in Schools San Antonio, the San Antonio Education Partnership and other organizations. He has also served as a fellow with the American Council on Education and conducted postgraduate study at the Harvard University Institute for Educational Management. Since becoming president of Palo Alto College in 2012, he has led many new initiatives for student success.

During the event, Flores guided the conversation to inspire participants to share effective strategies and evidence-based research for evaluating programs and initiatives that support minority student success. “Students come to community colleges like immigrants to America, hoping their journey leads to a better life,” Flores said.

Flores also moderated a panel that included Colette Pierce Burnette, Ed.D., president of Huston-Tillotson University; Vincent Solis, Ph.D., senior vice president for academic and student affairs at Laredo Community College; and Naomi Story, Ph.D., executive director for the National Asian Pacific Islander Council.

Burnette reminded the audience that the concerning data about student success struggles is not new, so rather than focusing on what the data says we should focus on what can be done to change it. Solis discussed how his college attempts to impact student success through faculty support and personal development, saying, “If you’re going to move the needle [on minority student success], it’s going to happen in the classroom.” Story added, “Curriculum and retention are deeply connected, so faculty leadership and buy-in are deeply needed.”

Terrell Strayhorn, Ph.D., founder and CEO of Do Good Work Educational Consulting, LLC, gave the plenary address Saturday morning. Strayhorn holds a doctorate degree in higher education from Virginia Tech and is an internationally recognized student success scholar, highly acclaimed public speaker and award-winning writer. He is the author of 10 books and more than 200 book chapters, journal articles and other scholarly publications. His research focuses on major policy issues in education such as student access and achievement; issues of race, equity and diversity; impact of college on students; and student learning and development. Strayhorn is also known for using the hashtag #DoGoodWork on social media, was named one of the country’s top diversity scholars by Diverse: Issues in Higher Education magazine in 2011, one of Business First’s Top 40 Under 40 and became the youngest full-time professor in Ohio State University’s history in 2014.

Strayhorn talked about how “access without success is useless,” and to achieve student success, we need retention plus persistence. He also stated, “We need a more nuanced framework for understanding our international students and their experiences because these students, like all minority and underserved students, do not have a one-size fits all background.”

The conference also included breakout sessions and a graduate student poster session.

The MSI Convening was made possible in part through a grant from the AANAPISI program of the Department of Education and by State Farm®.

Holding two designations by the U.S. Department of Education as an AANAPISI and a Hispanic-Serving Institution (HSI), Richland College is one of only nine higher education institutions in the U.S. awarded the AANAPISI grant in fiscal year 2015. With approximately 15 percent of Richland College’s student population comprised of Asian American and Native American Pacific Islander (AAPI) students and at least half demonstrating financial need, AANAPISI funding impacts many of the college’s underserved students. The program helps Richland College to increase the three-year graduation rate for AAPI students who have one or more risks to success and completion, such as financial need or academic challenges.

For more information on the MSI Convening, visit richlandcollege.edu/msi-convening.


Richland College Dance Program Presents ‘Thriller’ Fall Concert

The Richland College dance program will be preying on our fear of the unknown with an upcoming fall dance concert, “Thriller,” at 12:30 and 7:30 p.m. Friday, Nov. 3.

Directed by Richland College dance director Gina Sawyer, “Thriller” will involve both students and faculty in choreography and performance roles, with dance genres including contemporary modern, lyrical, jazz, tap and hip-hop.

“Thriller” is about exploring the mystery of the unknown through dance performance. Each choreographer has created a unique take on the subject, ranging from celebrating recognizable images in pop culture to conceptual pieces addressing surreal fantasy.

Sawyer also created an original piece, “The Scream,” which will be performed by Richland students.

“I am hoping to get a reaction of discomfort by abstracting and juxtaposing everyday and invented movements in a bizarre fashion, allowing the visual imagery of the dance to build in intensity until it reaches out and grabs the audience,” Sawyer said of her piece.

In addition to Sawyer, choreography will include original pieces by Cooper Delgado, Christie Nelson and Lauren Schieffer. Repertoire will include a tap piece from Dallas legend Buster Cooper, recreated by his granddaughter, guest artist Keira Leverton. The Dallas Neo-Classical Ballet Company under the direction of Emilie Skinner will also guest perform.

Kiera Leverton comes from a dance background—her grandfather was Buster Cooper, an influential tap dancer who founded the dance program at the Hockaday School. Much of her exposure to the tap community was through tap festivals such as the Chicago Human Rhythm Project and the Third Coast Rhythm Project, and she trained with a variety of professionals, including Gregory Hines and Yuji Uragami. Leverton has performed worldwide at venues such as Radio City Music Hall and Wembley Stadium in London.

Dallas Neo-Classical Ballet was established in 2011 as a nonprofit organization to bring concerts emphasizing neo-classical ballet to the Dallas-Fort Worth community, while also creating a venue for experienced classical dancers to utilize their training. The company’s dancers are primarily from the north Texas region.

Neoclassical ballet is the style of classical ballet exemplified by sophisticated and modern choreography, retaining the pointe shoe aesthetic, but often without the excessive drama and mime of the full length story ballets of previous eras.

The Richland College dance program provides a challenging teaching and learning environment for students that values diversity and develops artistic excellence, fosters creative and collaborative practices and encourages personal agency and social responsibility in appreciating dance.

“Thriller” is free and open to the public in the Fannin Performance Hall on the east side of the Richland College campus. Richland College is located at 12800 Abrams Road.


Richland Collegiate High School Principal Receives T.A.S.R.O. Administrator of the Year Award

Richland Collegiate High School (RCHS) principal Craig Hinkle recently received the Texas Association of School Resource Officers (TASRO) 2017 Administrator of the Year Award. This prestigious award is designed to honor administrators who have gone the extra mile to make sure their staff and students are safe and thriving.

Hinkle has served as principal since 2015, where he works with staff to address teaching and learning needs of teachers and students and makes himself available for the RCHS Student Resource Officers (SRO), students, staff and faculty.

“I am humbled and honored to be selected for the award, but the reality is that Corporal Vincent Brooks, our SRO, is deserving of the award,” said Hinkle. “Without his hard work on a daily basis in developing relationships with our students this would not have been possible.  He goes above and beyond to make sure our kids are taken care of and are safe and secure.”

Hinkle has worked with high school students for more than 20 years. He started his career in 1996 as a high school teacher in Brownwood, Tex. In 2012, he graduated with his master’s degree in Education Leadership and Policy Studies from the University of Texas at Arlington. He has been working with RCHS since he was hired as an assistant principal in 2013. Later, he received the 2016 DCCCD Administrator of the Year Award for his excellent service to RCHS.

As RCHS principal, Hinkle increases student engagement by helping to shape students for future growth. He also supports the Dallas County Community College District (DCCCD) police and the RCHS SRO, and involves the SRO in daily decisions, classroom presentations and keeping the SRO informed of future activities. In addition, he addresses students and staff when safety exercises for the school are conducted, and assists with First 5 Minutes safety training for campus personnel.

The Texas Association of School Resource Officers is a nonprofit corporation for school-based law enforcement officers, school administrators and school safety/security personnel. It was created for the advancement of education and charity; to provide a means to disseminate, share, advise and coordinate information on the value of qualified law enforcement officers to teach elementary through senior high school students the principles of good citizenship and community responsibility; and to demonstrate the dangers associated with substance abuse, criminal activities, immoral and unethical behavior and other anti-social behavior.

Richland Collegiate High School is a school designed to provide a rigorous academic experience for high school juniors and seniors. Students complete their last two years of high school at Richland College by taking college courses and earning college credits. These students can potentially graduate simultaneously with both their high school diploma and an associate degree, prepared to transfer to a four-year university. Tuition and books are free, making RCHS an educational and affordable choice.

For information about Texas Association of School Resource Officers, visit tasro.org. For information about Richland Collegiate High School, visit alt.richlandcollege.edu/rchs.


Richland College Hosts Free Employment Readiness Workshop in Tech Fields for Veterans, Others

Military veterans and other potential job seekers are invited to attend a free workshop that offers a wide range of services for individuals who want to work in lucrative technology fields. The one-day job readiness workshop at Richland College will be held Wed., Sept. 20, from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. in room SH118 of Sabine Hall. Richland College is located at 12800 Abrams Rd. in Dallas.

The goal of the event, billed the “Veterans Employment Workshop,” is designed to help participants uncover job opportunities, obtain interviews and interact with potential employers. Although the event is tagged for military veterans, the workshop is open to everyone, including Dallas County Community College District students and non-students alike, said Kimberly Archer, veteran affairs coordinator for Richland College.

“There’s a need to help veterans transfer what they did in the service into what’s available in the current workforce,” Archer said.

Representatives from Texas Instruments, Cyxtera, Compass Data Centers, Bright Horizons, Evolve, Uptime Institute and other employers will be on hand to provide resume and job hunting tips.

Job search expert and radio personality Todd Bermont also will provide insider secrets to finding employment. Bermont is the former host of “Your Career” on Lone Star Radio FM104.5. He has been featured on Fox News, CNN and ABC News Now.

The event is free, but space is limited. Dress is business casual. Attendees are encouraged to bring copies of their resumes and arrive early for the 10:30 a.m. check-in. Participants will be treated to a free lunch and a one-year subscription to “The Careers College” online job search training program by TCC Learning LLC – a $297 value.

To register, click on this link: dcccd.edu/VEW

“G.I. Jobs 2017” listed Richland College as one of the country’s top military-friendly schools. Richland was awarded a $3.25 million Trade Adjustment Assistance Community College and Career Training (TAACCCT) grant to help veterans acquire new job skills for immediate employment.

For more information, call 972-238-3778 or send an email to rlcveteranservices@dcccd.edu.

 (courtesy of DCCCD)


RCHS to Host Cleaning Supplies Drive Sept. 8 for Rural Texas Town Hit by Hurricane Harvey

Richland Collegiate High School (RCHS) Service Learning students will be hosting a cleaning supplies drive Friday, Sept. 8, to benefit Mont Belvieu, a small, rural community northeast of Houston with 5,000 residents who were impacted by Hurricane Harvey and received 61 inches of rain.

Anyone interested in assisting RCHS with this drive is welcome to bring cleaning supplies between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. to either the east or west circles on the Richland College campus, located at 12800 Abrams Rd. in Dallas. Supplies needed include buckets, hand sanitizer, insect repellant, scrub brushes, cleaning cloths and towels, heavy duty trash bags, protective masks, disposable gloves, work gloves, clotheslines and clothespins.

The cleaning supplies will be delivered to Mont Belvieu on Saturday, Sept. 9. In addition to this drive, the Service Learning students have pledged to reach out and help this small community in a long-term commitment to see the residents through the extended recovery process. RCHS will hold future drives in Nov. and Dec. to collect food items and warm clothing.

For more information about Richland Collegiate High School, visit alt.richlandcollege.edu/rchs.


Richland Collegiate High School Paves the Way for Future S.T.E.M. Graduates with New Engineering Pathway

 

Eleven high school juniors from Richland Collegiate High School (RCHS) recently completed the first course in a new engineering pathway, paving the way not only for the students to get a head start on college-level courses while still in high school, but also for the students to become immediately employable, with some students even achieving a level-one manufacturing certification.

The first class in this new pathway was Drafting 1309, an intensive 13-day class taught by Mohammad-Ali Manouchehripour, Ph.D. In addition to basic drafting, students learned computer-aided design (CAD), a basic foundation of engineering, with the software AutoCAD. In this class, students learned how to draw an object and create a blueprint, and later they will actually be able to manufactur those objects.

“I think AutoCAD is a good software to learn in general because it has such a wide range of uses,” said Mitchell Zadnik, one of the RCHS students enrolled in Drafting 1309. “Our instructor told us some people take the class to make jewelry, some people take it for engineering and some people take it for the general knowledge of it.”

Students in the engineering pathway have access to Richland College’s Technology, Engineering and Advanced Manufacturing (TEAM) Center, a multi-million dollar learning space with leading edge, industry-quality technology that allows engineering and manufacturing students to have contemporary, hands-on learning experiences and career-focused training.

“Our students are going to be designing, developing and manufacturing their own parts and then assembling them into their own robotic assessments at the end of the program,” said Craig Hinkle, RCHS principal. “It is a very unique opportunity in public education for 16-year-old high school students to have access to multi-million dollar labs and manufacturing processes. When they leave here, they’ll be employable in the industry before they’ve even received their college degrees.”

“All of the software students learn in this class and this program can be added to their portfolios,” said Manouchehripour. “When they go to job interviews in two years, they will have experience with the software currently being used in the industry. Here at Richland College, everyone is a team. Our main agenda is to make sure we educate students, and to be a supplier to the demands of the local industries.”

When filling the inaugural drafting class, RCHS looked for students who were interested in math, science and engineering; students who may have already been in robotics clubs at their previous high schools; and students who had previously taken advanced math courses. For the duration of their time at RCHS, the students will work closely with RCHS senior academic advisors to develop a continued pathway based on their future educational and career goals.

Most of the 11 students in the inaugural class have dreams to go into various engineering fields, including but not limited to aerospace, biotechnical, software, manufacturing and mechanical. Other career aspirations include architecture, mathematics, marine biology and security.

In a pathway traditionally dominated by men, administrators were also pleased when the inaugural class had more female students than male students.

“More than 50 percent of the students are female, and we are really excited about that,” said Hinkle. “There has been a trend that math and science fields are dominated by males, and we as an American society have been trying to change that. Right now, we actually have about a 60/40 female-to-male ratio, of which we are proud. We hope that will be an inspiration to other female students in the future.”

Johannah Belk, one female RCHS student, joined this program because it offered more opportunities in engineering than her previous high school did.

“I’ve explored many different fields of engineering, but doing AutoCAD all day, every day in this course made me realize it’s what I want to do every day for the rest of my life, which is pretty exciting,” said Belk. “I’m hoping to design locks and go into security. I think the mechanisms inside locks can be advanced with growing technology, and I want to be a part of that.”

Another female RCHS student, Alaina Crowder, joined the program so she could gain college experience in high school before transferring to a four-year university.

“My dream job is to be a manufacturing engineer,” said Crowder. “After taking this class and being shown around a manufacturing lab, I became super interested in that field. I hope I’ll be able to work in a lab like this one someday.”

Richland Collegiate High School is a school designed to provide a rigorous academic experience for high school juniors and seniors. Students complete their last two years of high school at Richland College by taking college courses and earning college credits. These students can potentially graduate with both their high school diploma and an associate degree, prepared to transfer to a four-year university. Tuition and books are free, making RCHS an educational and affordable choice.

For more information about Richland Collegiate High School, visit alt.richlandcollege.edu/rchs.


Richland College to Host 2017 Minority Serving Institution Convening

Richland College, in collaboration with the Asian American Native American Pacific Islander Serving Institution (AANAPISI) program, will host the Minority Serving Institution (MSI) Convening, “Minority Student Success: Using Data to Effect Change,” during which higher education administrators from across the nation will gather to discuss effective research, initiatives and programs that impact the academic success of students at minority-serving institutions. The conference will take place Oct. 20-21.

While previous conferences have focused on best practices and innovation, this year’s MSI Convening will cover existing evidence and develop more robust methods for determining success of minority programs and initiatives so that colleges and universities can improve, obtain funding and effect change.

This year’s event will kick off Friday morning with a keynote address from Dr. Mike Flores, president of Palo Alto College, a part of the Alamo College District in San Antonio. Dr. Terrell Strayhorn, founder and CEO of Do Good Work Educational Consulting, LLC, will be giving the plenary address Saturday morning. The conference will also include panel discussions and breakout sessions.

Attendance is free, and attendees are encouraged to register online by Oct. 6 at richlandcollege.edu/msi-convening.

The MSI Convening is made possible in part through a grant from the AANAPISI program of the Department of Education and by State Farm®.

Holding two designations by the U.S. Department of Education as an AANAPISI and a Hispanic-Serving Institution (HSI), Richland College is one of only nine higher education institutions in the U.S. awarded the AANAPISI grant in fiscal year 2015. With approximately 15 percent of Richland College’s student population comprised of Asian American and Native American Pacific Islander (AAPI) students and at least half demonstrating financial need, AANAPISI funding impacts many of the college’s underserved students. The program helps Richland College to increase the three-year graduation rate for AAPI students who have one or more risks to success and completion, such as financial need or academic challenges.

For more information on the MSI Convening, visit richlandcollege.edu/msi-convening.