Author Archives: Katie

Preview Day Richland College Preview Day on Feb. 23 a Chance for Potential Students and Their Parents to Learn About Richland College


Future Thunderducks and their parents are invited to learn about educational opportunities and campus life during Preview Day at Richland College, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 23. This event is free, though event registration is encouraged.

Visitors are welcome to check in at any point between 10 a.m. and 1 p.m., with a variety of information sessions and campus tours running from 10:30 a.m.-1:20 p.m. A free lunch will be available at noon for registered participants. Information session topics include college success, job outlook, admissions processes, student services offered at Richland College, credit and noncredit college programs and more.

Academic program coordinators will be available to answer questions during the sessions, and students will be able to complete and submit an admission application on-site. In addition, representatives from various student services areas such as the Multicultural Center, Transfer Center, Career Services, Disability Services and more will explain how these services can assist student success at Richland College.

“Preview Day at Richland College is an excellent opportunity for future students not only to see our beautiful campus and learn about all the great programs and services we offer, but also to imagine him or herself as a Thunderduck,” said Janita Patrick, dean of student services at Richland College. “This is a great event for students and parents to come by, ask questions and allow us to assist them in the process of enrolling in college.”

A link to register and a complete schedule of events, including details about each of the 39 sessions, is available at www.richlandcollege.edu/preview.


An aerial, black and white image of the northeast corner of Little Egypt in 1962. Dallas’ Lost Neighborhood, “Little Egypt,” is Focus of Free Presentation at African American Museum

When Richland College faculty members Clive Siegle and Tim Sullivan started collaborating on the joint project “Finding Little Egypt,” little did they know how far they and their students would delve into the history and anthropology of a Dallas neighborhood which disappeared decades ago.

The history of that missing community and where its residents went will be the subject of a free presentation by Siegle and Sullivan on Sat., Feb. 9, at the African American Museum of Dallas. “Lost and Found: Little Egypt, Fifty Years Later,” which starts at 1 p.m. in the museum’s AT&T auditorium, is free and open to the public. 

Siegle, the historian, lives on the cusp of the long-lost neighborhood, but the significance of that location wasn’t apparent until he noticed a subtle difference between the curb and streets of a nearby shopping center and the rest of his neighborhood.

Siegle started checking with his own neighbors and learned that the shopping center sat on the site of a black community whose residents and homes disappeared almost overnight in the 1960s. Founded by a former slave, Little Egypt was located on 30 acres of land along Northwest Highway – an area currently known as the Lake Highlands neighborhood of Dallas.

The rest, as they say, is history – and a past that the Richland College professor and his colleague began to track down and document three years ago. 

“We are excited to share our findings and the history of Little Egypt with the Dallas community,” said Siegle. “Preserving history is critical, and we want people to learn more about African American communities like Little Egypt. It’s particularly fitting that we are sharing our work at the African American Museum during Black History Month. With our students’ help and the support of family members who lived in Little Egypt, the project will continue to expand as we document the history of that community.”

Little Egypt, during its heyday, thrived for 80 years – even without city services and paved streets which surrounding neighborhoods enjoyed – and then almost mysteriously disappeared overnight in 1962 when a developer became interested in the tract of land. More than 200 residents sold their homes and moved out at the same time, using 37 moving vans; the neighborhood was torn down almost immediately.

Who were those residents? Where did they go? Where could Siegle and Sullivan start to trace the neighborhood’s history and relocation? Those are the questions that Richland College students have been working on with their professors, starting with the community’s Egypt Chapel Baptist Church and nearby McCree Cemetery, using old photographs, search grids, measurements, surface artifacts and documents to do some old-fashioned detective work.

That’s the story they will tell during their presentation at the African American Museum. Siegle and Sullivan also will share their most current work: locating, charting and excavating the home of the McCoy family whose house sat on the only piece of land that was never redeveloped after the neighborhood disappeared. They also are creating a computer-generated, 3-D model of the home.

Members of the McCoy family have been instrumental in assisting with the Little Egypt project, said Siegle, as well as providing crucial information about life in the settlement during the years prior to its demise.

Siegle, who came to Richland in 2003, earned his master’s degree in international affairs (with a specialty in African military studies) from George Washington University and his doctorate in history from Southern Methodist University. He spent more than 30 years in the business sector as a buyer, safari outfitter, magazine editor and creative director. 

Sullivan earned his master’s degree in conservation anthropology from SMU and spent many years teaching before he received his doctorate in transatlantic history from the University of Texas at Arlington. He has taught at UTA, Texas Christian University and, most recently, at Richland College, where he serves as lead faculty member and coordinator for the anthropology department. Sullivan’s research interests focus on intercultural and interracial interactions, plus their long-term consequences.

 For more information about the event, please contact W. Marvin Dulaney at 817-406-8443 or Jane Jones at 214-565-9026, ext. 328.

(Article courtesy of Ann Hatch, Dallas County Community College District)


Military Friendly School Silver Logo Richland College Designated a Military Friendly School for Tenth Consecutive Year

Richland College has been recognized as a top college for veterans and active duty military members for the tenth consecutive year by receiving a 2019-2020 Military Friendly® Schools Silver Award. The Military Friendly® Schools program honors U.S. colleges, universities and trade schools that are doing the most to embrace America’s military service members, veterans and spouses and to dedicate resources to ensure their success in the classroom and after graduation. A silver designation means that Richland College has programs that scored within 30 percent of the tenth ranked institution within a given category.

The Veterans Services office at Richland College works with veteran students and their families to help them complete their educational goals by maximizing their military education benefits. Many resources are available through Veteran Services, including assistance with benefits, financial aid and a variety of other support services for the college’s veteran and military students, dependents and spouses.

Richland College offers eligible students and spouses NAVPA scholarships, Hazelwood and Montgomery G.I. Bill® services and opportunities, and the college also hosts events such as Military Appreciation Day, to support veterans. In addition, Richland College has many career and technical education programs designed for quick employment in the areas of business professions, computer technology, Allied Health and advanced manufacturing and engineering technology. These programs offer industry-standard training and certifications.

Military Friendly® Schools was created by Victory Media, Inc., a leading media outlet for military personnel transitioning into civilian life. To see how Richland College scored in various areas, visit www.militaryfriendly.com/schools/richland-college.

For more information about Richland College’s veteran services, visit www.richlandcollege.edu/services/veterans.


Headshot of Dr. Raghunath Kanakala Dr. Raghunath Kanakala Appointed Richland College Executive Dean for Engineering and Technology

Richland College has named Raghunath Kanakala to the position of executive dean of its School of Engineering and Technology. Kanakala’s appointment was approved by the Dallas County Community College District Board of Trustees Dec. 4, and he will assume this role in early 2019.

Kanakala currently serves as dean of technical education at Aiken Technical College in South Carolina. While there, Kanakala has overseen 12 technical education program areas, including industrial maintenance, welding, HVAC, CNC, graphics, electrical technology, radiation protection, tower, nuclear fundamentals, pre-engineering, physics and chemistry.

Prior to his current role at Aiken Technical College, Kanakala was an assistant professor in the University of Idaho – Idaho Falls College of Engineering, a research scientist and lecturer for the Inamori School of Engineering at Alfred University in New York and a graduate research and teaching assistant in the Colleges of Engineering at the University of Nevada Reno and the University of Nevada Las Vegas.

His academic leadership has included management of a $2.5 million Individuals Safety Training to Achieve Climber Credentials grant to train and place low-skilled workers, Trade Adjustment Assistance-certified workers and others in high-demand jobs in the tower industry and to reduce fatalities in the industry. He also holds a U.S. Patent in “combustion synthesis method and boron-containing materials produced therefrom,” and has developed curriculum, published 16 articles in industry journals and delivered numerous conference presentations.

At Richland College, Kanakala will provide academic leadership for the School of Engineering and Technology, which offers programs in computer information technology, computer science, cyber security, engineering, engineering technology (advanced manufacturing and electronics technology), interactive simulation and game technology, multimedia, networking/authorized training (Amazon Web Services, Cisco, Microsoft, Oracle, UNIX), photography/imaging, PC support and semiconductor manufacturing technology.

The Richland College School of Engineering and Technology also supports the Technology, Engineering and Advanced Manufacturing Center, a learning space for relevant, hands-on experience and career-focused training with leading edge, industry-quality technology for engineering and manufacturing students.

Upon entering his new role, Kanakala hopes to advance Richland College’s student success initiatives, faculty development and community partnerships, particularly regarding apprenticeships, internships, curriculum development and articulation agreements.

“I would like to increase the awareness about engineering transfer degrees,” Kanakala said. “Also, I would like to work on improving the apprenticeship models for different programs.”

“Dr. Kanakala brings proven leadership experience in engineering and technology education, and I am very excited to welcome him to Richland College as our new executive dean,” said Shannon Cunningham, Richland College executive vice president for academic affairs and student success. “I know he will continue to advance the mission, vision and strategic direction for our School of Engineering and Technology as we continue to deliver programs that meet industry demand and promote student success.”

Kanakala holds a Ph.D. and a Master of Science in Materials Science and Engineering from the University of Nevada Reno. He also earned a Master of Science in Electrical Engineering from the University of Nevada Las Vegas and a Bachelor of Electrical and Electronics Engineering from the Gandhi Institute of Technology and Management.


Amazon Web Services logo Richland College Offering Four Amazon Web Services Classes for Spring 2019

Richland College has four Amazon Web Services Academy curriculum classes for the spring 2019 semester. These AWS Solutions Architect courses are designed to prepare students for the AWS Certified Solutions Architect Associate certification exam. For students who need flexible class scheduling, two of the classes are at night, and one is an online course.

The classes are as follows:
Jan. 22-Mar. 8, 2019 – 1 p.m.-3:35 p.m. Mon.-Fri.
Jan. 22-Mar. 20, 2019 – 5:30-11:05 p.m., Mon. and Wed.
Feb. 11-May 10, 2019 – Online Course
Mar. 25-May 15, 2019 – 5:30-11:05 p.m., Mon. and Wed.

The AWS classes are taught by information technology and cloud computing faculty member Juli Hart. In these classes, students will develop technical expertise in cloud computing and will have access to course manuals, online knowledge assessments, a free practice certification exam and a discount voucher for the actual certification exam.

With AWS being the industry leader in cloud computing, AWS certification holders are extremely relevant and valued in the IT job market. According to the Global Knowledge 2018 IT Skills and Salary Survey, the average salary of AWS-certified professionals is 29 percent higher than average certified staff.

For information on registering for these classes at Richland College, visit richlandcollege.edu.

Amazon Web Services Logo


Two photos, one of each team. Players are all posing and smiling. Richland College Men’s and Women’s Soccer Teams Both Win National Championship Honors

Richland College men’s and women’s soccer teams won their respective National Junior College Athletic Association Division III National Championships last weekend, marking only the third time in NJCAA Division III history that a school has won the men’s and women’s national titles in the same year–records also held by Richland College in 2004 and 2006.

The men’s team traveled to Herkimer, NY, where they defeated Sussex 4-0 on Nov. 8, Genesee 7-3 on Nov. 9 and Nassau 6-1 on Nov. 11. This final win gave the men’s team their seventh national title. Their final 6-1 score against Nassau was also the largest margin of victory in a Division III championship match in NJCAA history.

The women’s team traveled to Rockford, Ill., where they defeated Holyoke 9-0 on Nov. 8, Brookdale 5-1 on Nov. 9 and Delta 1-0 on Nov. 11. This is the women’s team’s fourth national title.

Mohamed Sesay, men’s forward, was named the Tournament MVP after scoring five goals and recording an assist during the span of three games. Sesay and Mariano Fazio, defender, and Lucio Martinez, midfielder, earned spots on the All-Tournament Team. In addition, Coach Sean Worley was named Coach of the Tournament.

Miranda Ibarra, women’s defender, was named Tournament MVP, Eva Mulligan was named Offensive MVP and Dynastee Cain was named Defensive MVP. Additionally, forward Asia Revelry was named to the All-Tournament Team and Coach Scott Toups was named Coach of the Tournament.

Both Richland College men’s and women’s soccer teams have winning reputations and have traveled across the country to play in exhibition and postseason games in places like California, Kansas, New York, Chicago, New Jersey and Missouri. The men’s team has seven national championships from 2002, 2003, 2004, 2006, 2007, 2016 and 2018. For more information, visit www.richlandcollege.edu/sliferlc/athletics/mensoccer/pages/default.aspx. The women’s team has four national championships from 2004, 2006, 2009 and 2018. For more information, visit www.richlandcollege.edu/sliferlc/athletics/womensoccer/pages/default.aspx.


Many red ceramic poppies are displayed, "planted" in the ground. Richland College to Honor Veterans Day with ‘The Blood of Heroes Never Dies’ Poppy Exhibit Rededication

For several weeks in November 2015, Richland College was home to a sea of red ceramic poppies—5,171 to be exact—one poppy for every Texas soldier killed in World War I. A lone white poppy represented the single Texas nurse who also perished. This year, Richland College is honoring Veterans Day with a rededication of its poppy exhibit, “The Blood of Heroes Never Dies,” at noon Nov. 12 on the east side of Lake Thunderduck near Fannin Hall.

The original exhibit was dedicated during Richland College’s 2015 Veterans Day ceremony. After being on display on campus, some of the ceramic poppies traveled to Georgetown, Tex., where they were installed as part of the city’s annual Red Poppy Festival. The poppies were offered for sale in both Dallas and Georgetown for $10 each, with proceeds donated to Puppies Behind Bars, a nonprofit group that trains inmates to raise service dogs for wounded veterans. The organization received more than $25,000 from the poppy sales.

Since 2015, a small collection of the original poppies has been on permanent exhibit at Richland College. This year, students created 100 new poppies to replace those that have broken, and veterans will symbolically plant these fresh poppies in the display during this year’s Veterans Day event.

The permanent display, a striking patch of red along the lake that flows through campus with a recently installed plaque explaining its significance, has elicited both curiosity and pride when students, campus visitors and community members discover the meaning behind it. It is pride and the belief in the importance of this display that have inspired the volunteers who helped create the new poppies and who will be giving their time at the rededication event.

“In 2015, ‘The Blood of Heroes Never Dies’ challenged the Richland community to create a memorial honoring Texas soldiers killed in World War I,” said ceramics faculty member Jen Rose. “This educated the participants about the historical importance of the war and allowed people of different backgrounds, ethnicities and ages to share an experience together. In the process of uniting to honor veterans, we discovered our humanity and remembered their sacrifice.”

“I wanted to volunteer in the ‘Blood of Heroes Never Dies’ event because I wanted to help everyone understand the things we take for granted each day,” said Jesus Porras, Richland College graduate and administrative clerk for Richland College Veterans Services. “We wouldn’t be here if it was not for the brave women and men that take an oath to serve the country in protecting us from threats to our union. These poppies that we plant here are a sign of remembrance and hope.”

“The Blood of Heroes Never Dies” was a collaboration between Rose and history professor Clive Siegle. The original exhibit was the only one of its kind in the U.S. and was modeled after the iconic “Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red” poppies exhibit at the Tower of London in 2014, during which 888,246 ceramic red poppies were on display in the tower’s moat to commemorate the British and colonial servicemen killed in World War I.

“The genesis of the symbolic connection of the poppy with commemorating veterans arose from a 1915 World War I poem, ‘In Flanders Fields,’ which emphasized poppies in its theme, and has become one of the most well-known war poems to emerge from any modern conflict,” said Siegle. “The 2015 ‘Blood of Heroes’ project was meant not only to honor veterans of all wars, but to coincide with a centenary anniversary year of both World War I, and the year the Flanders Fields poem with its iconic poppy references was written. This year has particular significance for revisiting and reaffirming the ongoing vision of the ‘Blood of Heroes’ project because this Veterans Day marks the one hundredth anniversary of the end of that war, which cost this nation more than 323,000 casualties, and this state 5,171 of its heroes.”

Remembrances or memorial poppies have been used since 1921 to commemorate soldiers who have died in wars. “In Flanders Fields” was penned by Lt. Col. John McCrae. Regretfully, McCrae did not survive the war and perished in January 1918. However, his poem lived on and inspired YMCA volunteer and teacher Moina Belle Michael always to remember those who died in the war and to write her pledge in the form of a poem, “We Shall Keep the Faith.” Rose and Siegle chose the passage from the ninth line of Michael’s poem, “The blood of heroes never dies,” as the theme for this memorial art installation project.

In addition to the rededication of “The Blood of Heroes Never Dies,” Richland College will be honoring Veterans Day with several other events. These include: a Richland Wind Symphony Tribute Concert, 11 a.m. Nov. 9 in El Paso Hall on the cafeteria stage; “Thank-A-Vet” card party, during which participants create thank you cards for veterans, 2 p.m. Nov. 12 in El Paso Hall student lounge area; and a benefits chat hosted by Richland College Veterans Services, 2 p.m. Nov. 14 in El Paso Hall, room E081. All events are free and open to the public.

Richland College is located at 12800 Abrams Rd. For more information about Richland College Veterans Services, visit www.richlandcollege.edu/services/veterans.


"It's Election Day, Vote! dcccd.edu/votes" and an image of a mouth. Go Vote! Election Day is Tuesday, Nov. 6!

Make your voice heard! If you didn’t vote early, cast your ballot on Election Day, Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2018!

Below is a compilation of information you may find useful. The below information is for Dallas County residents.

First, find your precinct polling location so you know where you need to go on Election Day! You can also use this link to look up your sample ballot.
https://www.dallascountyvotes.org/voter-lookup/#VoterEligibilitySearch

Once you know where to go and have your sample ballot, research your candidates so you know who you want to vote for and why! Here are a few good, nonpartisan resources:
https://my.lwv.org/texas/voters-guide
https://theskimm.com/noexcuses/myballot 

Okay, so now you know who you’re voting for and you’re heading to the polls! Here are a few frequently asked questions:

Do I need to bring an ID?
Yes. Identification is required for voting in person, so make sure you bring a driver’s license, Texas personal ID card, passport or one of the other acceptable forms of ID listed here: https://www.dallascountyvotes.org/election-day-voting/what-do-i-need-in-order-to-vote/

I have difficulty walking or standing for long periods. Can someone help me?
Yes! Dallas County offers curbside voting for those who have disabilities that make it difficult to vote inside a polling location. If someone is with you, just have that person notify an election official when you arrive at the polling location, and an official will bring your ballot to your car. If no one is with you, call 214-819-6338 ahead of time and notify the election day clerk that you would like to do curbside voting.

I have another question. Who should I contact?
You can visit www.dallascountyvotes.org for additional information, or you can contact the Dallas County Elections Department at 214-819-6300.


Konley Kelley poses inside an aircraft. Richland’s Konley Kelley Shares Passion for Flight and World War II History With Emeritus Students

By day, Konley Kelley is the director of corporate and community relations at Richland College Garland Campus, overseeing contract training in the north Dallas area and assisting with the development of grant projects for the local business community. But when it’s time for the suit and tie to come off, Kelley hits the skies. A long-time volunteer with the Commemorative Air Force B-29/B-24 Squadron, Kelley has served as the editor of “The Flyer” newsletter since 2012 and has been the squadron’s education officer since the title’s creation in late 2017.

Recently, work and play collided when Konley gave a presentation on the CAF as part of the Emeritus program’s Enrichment lecture series. Richland College’s Emeritus program offers a variety of affordable classes and programs to individuals over 50 who enjoy continued learning.

“Many of the Emeritus program members lived through World War II or have clear memories of their parents in the 1940s and ‘50s, who grew up as part of the Greatest Generation,” explained Kelley. “Many Emeritus participants are veterans and history buffs. I think my presentation helps them remember a time that seems distant for people my age—52—and younger, and it encompasses many of their cherished memories. With 18,000 B-24 Liberators built during World War II, some attendees had relatives who flew aboard these aircraft, while many others have fond memories of seeing the aircraft at airshows throughout the years.”

The CAF B-29/B-24 squadron is under the charter of the Commemorative Air Force, an organization dedicated to acquiring, restoring and preserving a complete collection of combat aircraft flown by all military services of the U.S., along with selected aircraft of other nations, for the education and enjoyment of present and future American generations, while also paying tribute to the thousands of men and women who built, serviced and flew them in defense of the U.S.

Kelley’s Emeritus presentation on Sept. 24 included an explanation of the CAF and upcoming plans for a CAF national airbase in Dallas, which will include an aviation museum and regularly hosted air shows. He also described his personal experiences with the organization, shared videos and told stories about veterans who have been able to ride in the B-29/B-24 squadron’s legendary planes for the first time since serving in World War II.

“I personally really enjoy being around these beautiful warbirds and learning the history of World War II,” said Kelley. “Through projects in the CAF and the newsletter, I am able to share the stories of the Greatest Generation and these remarkable aircraft with others and promote the mission of the Commemorative Air Force.”

This presentation was Kelley’s fifth Emeritus presentation. In addition to several general CAF presentations similar to this one, Kelley has also previously presented on the B-29 Superfortress “FIFI,” the B-24 Liberator “Diamond Lil” and American women in World War II. He has also participated in events for Richland College Veterans Services.

The CAF gives Kelley an outlet to explore another passion of his, scale and 3-D modeling. “I love the detail and craftsmanship involved in the modeling,” he explained. “Each model also represents the story of a person, moment or machine and most of my projects are associated with military history. Now with the CAF, I get to play with the 1:1 scale models!”

Kelley isn’t the only Richland College employee with eyes to the skies. Two other Richland College employees also volunteer for the CAF. Angie Whitney, leadership trainer, is one of the few qualified female loadmasters on a B-24. Lisa Foster, adjunct faculty member, is a living history representation of “Rosie the Riveter,” a World War II icon who symbolized women’s “We Can Do It” attitude by stepping up to work in factories and shipyards. Foster is also the executive officer of the Women Airforce Service Pilots Squadron.

Kelley has been working for Richland College since May 1997. Since then, he has been an Administrator of the Year nominee in 2005 and 2007. His current position is focused on community outreach for corporate services, which provides training to companies at their worksites to provide a more skilled workforce. In turn, this training gives employees the opportunity to earn higher wages and become more promotable through their learned skills.

The Richland College Emeritus plus 50 program provides affordable classes to people ages 50 and older to help them stay intellectually challenged, physically fit and socially connected. Dallas County residents 65 years old and older who have lived in Texas for at least one year may receive free tuition for up to six college credit hours per semester. For more information, visit www.richlandcollege.edu/emeritus.

The CAF B-29/B-24 Squadron maintains, preserves and operates the world’s only operational B-29A, “FIFI,” and B-24A, “Diamond Lil.” The squadron regularly brings together the aircraft, pilots and crews from over 70 CAF units across the country to create the AirPower Squadron, an assortment of military aircraft touring across the U.S. The tour will always include at least one of the squadron’s rare, premiere bombers: “FIFI” or “Diamond Lil.” For more information, visit www.cafb29b24.org.

The CAF is the largest flying museum in the world. It is a nonprofit educational organization dedicated to honoring American military aviation history through flight, exhibition and remembrance. The CAF has approximately 12,000 members and a fleet of more than 160 aircraft assigned to 63 units across the country. These units are comprised of CAF volunteer members who restore and operate the planes that are viewed by more than 10 million spectators annually. For more information, visit www.commemorativeairforce.org.


Two students dance in the fall 2017 Richland College production of "Thriller" Richland College Dance Program Presents ‘DANCE–Take a Walk on the Wild Side!’ Fall Dance Concert

The Richland College dancers may not have moves like Jagger, but they will have moves like jaguars! The fur will be flying at the upcoming fall dance concert, “DANCE—Take a Walk on the Wild Side!,” at 12:30 and 7:30 p.m. Friday, Nov. 2.

Directed by Richland College dance director Gina Sawyer, “DANCE—Take a Walk on the Wild Side!” will involve both students and faculty in choreography and performance roles, with dance genres including contemporary modern, lyrical, jazz, tap and hip-hop.

“DANCE—Take a Walk on the Wild Side!” is a creative endeavor to bring awareness and to inspire a passion for nature and wildlife with a zoological theme, and audiences are invited to attend and engage in a “zoo-rific” opportunity to appreciate dance.

Choreography will include original pieces by Cheryl Callon, Cooper Delgado, Kaley Jensen and Lauren Schieffer-Holley. Repertoire will include a tap piece from Dallas legend Buster Cooper, recreated by his granddaughter, guest artist Keira Leverton and performance by her company Choreo Records. Guest artists include Kaley Jensen and Dallas Black Dance Theater’s Encore!

Leverton comes from a dance background—her grandfather was Buster Cooper, an influential tap dancer who founded the dance program at the Hockaday School. Much of her exposure to the tap community was through tap festivals such as the Chicago Human Rhythm Project and the Third Coast Rhythm Project, and she trained with a variety of professionals, including Gregory Hines and Yuji Uragami. Leverton has performed worldwide at venues such as Radio City Music Hall and Wembley Stadium in London.

Jensen was born and raised in Atlanta and graduated from Brigham Young University with a major in dance and minor in business. While at BYU, Jensen performed and toured with the Theatre Ballet Company all four years. Jensen has trained on multiple scholarship programs, including the San Francisco Conservatory of Dance and Ballet West, as well as achieving academic and international talent awards at the World Dance Movement in Italy. Last May, Jensen completed her M.F.A. in dance at the University of Arizona, where she also deepened her passion for performing, educating and choreographing. Currently, Jensen dances professionally as a company member with Ballet North Texas.

Dallas Black Dance Theater’s Encore!, under the direction of Nycole Ray, is a professional company that consists of eight aspiring artists from around the nation. Since its inception, Encore! has grown in popularity and thrilled audiences with its fresh allure. Encore! provides an opportunity for young artists to develop their dance skills while serving the Dallas/Ft. Worth community and touring around the world with dance performances of the highest artistic quality.

The Richland College dance program provides a challenging teaching and learning environment for students who value diversity. The program develops artistic excellence, fosters creative and collaborative practices and encourages personal agency and social responsibility in appreciating dance.

“DANCE—Take a Walk on the Wild Side!” is free and open to the public in the Fannin Performance Hall on the east side of the Richland College campus. Richland College is located at 12800 Abrams Road.