Tag Archives: professional development

Writing to Win: Deliver What You Promise

WRITING TO WIN:  Deliver What You Promise

Delivering what you promise is crucial in the workplace. It not only reinforces your success, it also bolsters your trustworthiness. It is important to understand that delivering what you promise is a concept that applies to employee and employer. So, it is not enough to understand what you need to do to keep your promises. You must also understand what your employer needs to do to keep their promises. Making good on commitments is a golden rule.  Not making good can create adverse effects for the employee, the employer, and business clients as well.  Altogether, the overall well-being of your company can be threatened.  So, let’s take a brief look at how you can keep your promises, and how employers should keep their promises to you.

BUT…

HOW EMPLOYEES CAN KEEP THEIR PROMISES:

It seems as if there is more pressure on an employee to deliver than an employer. It’s certainly plausible given who has the most power. Clearly, the employer appears to be in that position because we don’t want to be fired for poor performance.  So, the pressure is indeed on. Hanging on to a paycheck and benefits is major motivation when it comes to committing to things that may not be possible.

  • Don’t Promise Unrealistic Delivery Dates – Realize your constraints. Present realistic deadline dates for yourself and your team. Yes, being an independent contributor is great because you feel you are the master of your own destiny and are not dependent on others. But what if you are a member of a team? You cannot always predict who will complete tasks according to the schedule. You cannot always predict when you can complete tasks given ‘life circumstances’ that may pop up.
  • Be Realistic when it Comes to the Burdens of Workload– Sometimes job responsibilities change, workload increases. And as I said earlier, employers sometimes underplay the real demands of a job. In either case, most people feel they can keep up regardless. Be thoughtful and above all, be honest with yourself and your manager.  Do not commit to fully satisfying the demands of a position if it is not possible. Voice your concerns so that you can avoid being perceived as over promising and under-delivering.

HOW EMPLOYERS CAN KEEP THEIR PROMISES TO YOU:

Most of us like to believe our employer will always follow through on assurances he or she has committed too. But sometimes this is not always the case. So, it is important to be aware of fundamental promises between employer and employee.

  • Employers Should Never be Biased when Granting Promotions – This is absolutely not supposed to occur. It compromises not only ethical principles, but practically speaking, customary human resource directives. And violating these directives can put the company at risk for civil suits given equal protection.
  • Employers Should Always Be Truthful about Job Responsibilities – Remember the old saying, ‘necessity is the mother of invention’? In some cases, if the pressure to fill a position is too great, necessity could entice an employer to stretch the truth when it comes to the realities of workload in a particular position.
  • Employers Should Never Allow Special Privileges to a Few – Seniority and long-time friendships should not influence favors and privileges in a non-union environment. Still, this can occur. An employer or manager given the right circumstances may over promise that he or she will not be partial to specific employees, but may not keep that promise.

WAYS TO AVOID AND RECOVER FROM OVER PROMISING:

  • Be honest with yourself before making a commitment on delivery dates with your client, or workload responsibilities with your employer. Can it be done?
  • Set realistic expectations with your client and employer.
  • Take ownership if you fail to meet expectations. If you are part of a team, do not place the blame on other members. This is counter-productive and will cast a negative light on you.
  • Communicate Quickly and Honestly. If you can see that you are not living up to promises or delivery dates, do not wait until recovery is not possible. As soon as you see the ‘danger signs’ either in your general workload, scheduled date to roll out a product or solution, SPEAK UP.

For an expanded discussion on business writing and workplace etiquette, see my book:

Royce Murcherson, Ph.D., The Guide to Persuasive Business Writing: A New Model that Gets Results. Iowa: Kendall-Hall, 2013

Clip Art, provided by Microsoft Office Professional Academic, 2010

If you want to develop or upgrade your skills to help you in today’s job market, consider enrolling in the Business Office Systems & Support program at Richland College. You will have a wide selection of courses (offered online and face-to-face) from which to choose. These courses range from basic keyboarding, computer literacy, administrative office procedures, business communications, Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Outlook, OneNote, Access (includes preparation for the Microsoft Office Specialist certification exam**) etc. These courses can all lead you towards a college-credit certificate or a 2-year associate’s degree.

Richland College is in northeast Dallas and located at 12800 Abrams Road. For more information, please contact Angela Nino at anino@dcccd.edu or call 972-238-6215.

**Richland College is an authorized Microsoft Testing Center.

***Get a Free Copy of Microsoft Office 365***If you are a student in the Dallas County Community College District, you are eligible to download a FREE version of Microsoft Office 365, which includes Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Access, Outlook, Publisher, and OneNote, which can be used on up to 5 devices.

Handy Tips for Linking Outlook and OneNote 2016 Together That Can Make Your Meetings More Efficient!

Do your responsibilities include planning meetings for yourself with (or for) others?

Let Microsoft’s Outlook and OneNote help you to plan these meetings, to develop agenda items, to assign tasks, and to stay in contact with key people all along the way.  

Tip 1: Create Agenda Items in OneNote.

While you are in OneNote, you can develop your agenda items from background materials and supporting information. OneNote is great for storing (and importing) detailed information from other sources such as the Internet, Word files, Excel files, PowerPoint, etc., as you continue to plan and develop the content for your meeting. If you need to share and get input from others, the OneNote Share feature comes in very handy during the preparation phase. You also have the option of emailing a OneNote page to a colleague.

Tip 2: Create Group(s) with Attendees in Outlook

If you meet with a group of individuals on a regular basis, you will want to create a group in Outlook that includes these individuals so your emails go out to them on a group basis. You can also easily keep track of who will be attending the meeting

Tip 3: Manage Your Calendar in Outlook

You can show others your availability for upcoming meetings and specify the range of dates and your availability type—busy, free, tentative, etc. The image on the left shows several options for viewing this information and whether you want to include details. Depending on you and your groups needs and wishes, you can also create group calendars that can be shared and emailed so that everyone is informed.

Tip 4: Take Meeting Notes in OneNote

Once your meeting begins and minutes need to be taken, you have two great OneNote options—if you have a laptop (or tablet) that supports handwriting conversion, you may want to use the Draw feature to write down the key points from the meeting. However, if your tablet doesn’t support “inking”—Ink to Text, you can still use your tablet to write down your minutes and then use a Windows PC with OneNote to convert the handwriting to text.

And you have yet another option, which is to record the minutes using the Audio feature (also includes a Video feature) in OneNote and is available on laptops. If you choose this option to capture your minutes, be sure you have a compatible microphone (and/or camera) for your laptop. Note: The OneNote app for tablets (iPad and Android) also allows you to record audio and video.

Tip 5: Follow Up on To Dos and Tasks in Outlook and OneNote

After most meetings, there is typically some follow up to be handled or task assignments made to various individuals. Use Outlook to assign specific tasks to individuals and review the progress on task completion. If you created your task assignments in Outlook, you can easily put this information in OneNote and vice versa. However, the one drawback, at this point in OneNote, is that note tags created in OneNote don’t show up in Outlook—though I’m sure Microsoft must be working on getting this feature off “the wish list” and granted!

If you want to learn how to increase your productivity and efficiency, consider taking an online course on Outlook and/or OneNote in the Business Office Systems & Support program (BOSS) at Richland College. The Outlook 2016 course is 7½ weeks (listed as POFI 1104-83438). This course also includes preparation to take the MOS certification exam for Outlook 2016. The OneNote 2016 course (POFI 1104‑83448) is also being offered online for 7 ½ weeks. Click this link for more details on dates for both courses.

Richland College is in northeast Dallas and located at 12800 Abrams Road. For more information, please contact Angela Nino at anino@dcccd.edu or call 972-238-6215.

**Richland College is an authorized Microsoft Testing Center.
***Get a Free Copy of Microsoft Office 365***If you are a student in the Dallas County Community College District, you are eligible to download a FREE version of Microsoft Office 365, which includes Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Access, Outlook, Publisher, and OneNote and can be used on up to 5 devices.

Wanted: Top-Flight Administrative Professionals Who Want to Grow with Their Companies!

499171549_aYes, today’s employers understand that not only are talented, highly-skilled administrative professionals assets to their companies but that they are also essential to the competitive success of these companies!

Over the years, the role of the administrative professional has changed dramatically, and the future shows that people who work in this capacity will continue to see changes in terms of duties and expectations.

In a 2015 joint research project conducted by Office Team and IAAP (International Association of Administrative Professionals), it was found that the skills most valued by employers and needed by administrative professionals include the following:

Time Management

The ability to maximize tasks effectively and efficiently is highly valued and desired. In fact, top-flight professionals are not only expected to manage their own tasks and time but also to manage the schedules of those whom they support—this may include team members, managing supervisors, and executives. Multi-tasking takes on a whole new meaning, but it goes with the turf for those who are truly successful in the art of task/time management.

Technical Skills

595140878_cBeing highly competent in Word, Excel, and PowerPoint—having your MOS certification in one or more of these applications—will go a long way in convincing a potential employer of your productivity capabilities.

Knowledgeable in layout and design—Microsoft Publisher for basic design (for more advanced projects, consider Adobe InDesign or Photoshop) can assist you in making your output look professional.

Collaboration and knowledge of databases—collaboration packages such as SharePoint are highly valued by companies as a way of housing company content and sharing this information within and among work groups. Other packages that are used by work groups for sharing (and by individuals) on projects include OneNote and Evernote. Your ability to work with databases such as Access and FileMaker Pro can only add to your attractiveness.

Social Media

Managers have increasingly turned to their admins in order to stay up-to-date on company social media interaction with customers, clients, and others. Knowing how to use social media professionally is now expected. Be sure you have a professional acquaintance with sites such as Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Pinterest, and Instagram; and know their role and how to use them as business tools.

 

170463151_eFinally, and according to Matt Krumrie, those skills that have become known as “soft skills” and that include excellent communication skills (written and verbal), outstanding tact and diplomacy when working with others, and strong critical-thinking skills are indispensable. These soft skills “round out” what goes in to becoming and staying a top-flight administrative office professional!

 

 

If you want to develop or upgrade your skills to help you in today’s job market, consider enrolling in the Business Office Systems & Support program at Richland College. You will have a wide selection of courses (offered online and face-to-face) from which to choose. These courses range from basic keyboarding, computer literacy, administrative office procedures, business communications, Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Outlook, OneNote, Access (includes preparation for the Microsoft Office Specialist certification exam**) etc. These courses can all lead you towards a college-credit certificate or a 2-year associate’s degree.

Richland College is in northeast Dallas and located at 12800 Abrams Road. For more information, please contact Angela Nino at anino@dcccd.edu or call 972-238-6215.

**Richland College is an authorized Microsoft Testing Center.

***Get a Free Copy of Microsoft Office 365***If you are a student in the Dallas County Community College District, you are eligible to download a FREE version of Microsoft Office 365, which includes Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Access, Outlook, Publisher, and OneNote, which can be used on up to 5 devices.
Sources:
1.  Krumrie, Matt (2016, July 7) What to Look For In A Great Administrative Assistant. Retrieved from  https://www.ziprecruiter.com/blog/what-to-look-for-in-a-great-administrative-assistant/
2.  Office Team (A Robert Half Company) and IAAP (2015) How to Hire All-Star Administrative Professionals and Maximize Their Potential. Retrieved from https://www.roberthalf.com/officeteam/office-of-the-future-how-to-hire-all-star-administrative-professionals-and-maximize-their-potential

 


WRITING TO WIN: MANAGING EXPECTATIONS IN BUSINESS WRITING

10-09-2016_aIt would be a wonderful thing to know exactly what people expect of you over and above your duties and responsibilities on the job.  You’d know exactly what to do to meet these additional expectations in your day-to-day performance. Being that the probabilities are high that most of the population cannot read minds, you must devise other ways to manage the expectations of your audience, namely, your colleagues, managers, or key stakeholders.

This is the third installment discussing key considerations for effective business communication. We’ll call this one, managing the expectations of audience. Or, as it is stated: Consider the Audience.

WHO IS MY AUDIENCE? 

You already know your audience will either be your colleagues, managers, or key stakeholders. Now, you must learn to write TO their beliefs, needs, and expectations in a way that will ‘win the day’.  That is, the means by which you can accomplish the goals laid out in your report, proposal, or executive summary.

Your Goal Should Be a Simple One, SUCCESS:

  • The acceptance of your proposed solution to a problem
  • The acceptance of your proposed improvement to a process
  • The acceptance of the progress you have made in a key on-going project.

HOW CAN I KNOW THEIR EXPECTATIONS?

  • Be aware of the project’s or division’s success objectives. These are specific things that must be achieved to demonstrate success in your department.
  • Be diligent on the job. Keep your ears open, stay informed, and engaged in the workplace.

HERE’S HOW MANAGING EXPECTATIONS WORKS

If you want to convince your manager to give you a shorter work week for the same pay, you’ll need to understand why he/she wouldn’t want to give you a shorter work week even though you’ll be working the same hours. In other words, you must figure out what she believes on the subject of shorter work weeks.  This is where you begin to make assumptions or guesses about her feelings on the subject of shorter work weeks.  When you begin to make these assumptions or educated guesses, you begin to write to the needs of your audience.

11-07-2016_bHERE’S AN EXAMPLE

You are a pharmaceuticals warehouse supervisor. Keeping track of inventory is an obvious priority. You know that inventory levels have been inaccurate in the last two accounting periods. You want to propose a solution to the problem, but before you present a ‘proposed plan’, you must try and figure out the expectations of your manager with regard to this problem. In short, you present your plan in such a way as to address what YOU THINK his beliefs and expectations may be given the current shrinkage problem. When you begin to make a mental list, it may look something look this if you were to write it down.

11-07-2016_cWALK A MILE IN ANOTHER PAIR OF SHOES

The Director of Corporate Logistics distributes a monthly newsletter that highlights shrinkage and how it decreases company profits. You know your manager keeps a close eye on this issue and measures warehouse shrinkage monthly, then reports this to corporate logistics. You also know that your manager constantly talks about adding more technology and wants to be noticed by the Director of Logistics. You also know that your facility manager would like to avoid hiring more security personnel.

11-07-2016_dTHEN PRESENT YOUR SOLUTION

This will be the first paragraph in your proposal

Based on last month’s warehouse inventory, there has been an eight percent increase in shrinkage. Our monthly sales figures do not support this high level of ‘missing’ merchandise. Nor can we afford to hire more security guards. Therefore, I would like to recommend a technological upgrade in our present security system. It will help us accomplish our goals without increasing payroll.

11-07-2016_eWRITING TO WIN THE END GAME

When you have a strong idea of what may be going on in the mind of your audience, you will have a strong idea of how to sell your idea. This is the same as building a strong persuasive document. A persuasive document is an argument. And building a good argument starts with creating the foundation upon which it rests. This foundation is the need to know your audience which brings us back to the three key considerations in effective written business communication.

REMEMBER: To Write Effectively

  • Consider the Length
  • Consider the Data
  • Consider the Audience

For an expanded discussion on effective business writing and workplace etiquette, see my book:

Royce Murcherson, Ph.D., The Guide to Persuasive Business Writing: A New Model that   Gets Results. Iowa: Kendall-Hall, 2013

Clip Art, provided by Microsoft Office Professional Academic, 2010

If you want to develop or enhance your business communication skills, consider enrolling in the Business Office Systems & Support (BOSS) program at Richland College.

Richland College is located in northeast Dallas at 12800 Abrams Road. For more information, please contact Angela Nino at anino@dcccd.edu or call 972-238-6215.

**Richland College is an authorized Microsoft Testing Center.

***Get a Free Copy of Microsoft Office***If you are a student in the Dallas County Community College District, you are eligible to download a FREE version of Microsoft Office, which includes Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Access, Outlook, Publisher, and OneNote. You can install this software on up to 5 devices.


Writing to Win: Consider the Data

10-09-2016_aWRITING TO WIN:  THE ART OF DETAIL

If you asked a room packed full with one-hundred college level sophomores, what is the value of detail?  What do you think would be the response? But let’s make this more interesting. Ask those same college sophomores what is the value of detail if their political science final exam will consist of only three essay questions? Chances are you would get a highly respectable response to the value of detail.  No doubt, you would more than likely hear shouts of words, words, and more words.

If you asked a room packed full with one-hundred investment bankers, what is the value of detail? What do you think would be the response? Again, let’s drill down to specifics. Ask those same investment bankers what is the value of detail when a three-billion dollar merger is resting on a conversion of stock plan? No doubt, you would surely hear shouts of numbers, numbers, and more numbers.

Words and numbers, numbers and words, it doesn’t take rocket science to figure out ‘when a big lot of something’ is riding on a single document, to lead with all the support you can muster is the best way to go to meet your goal. But, remember the last post? It was all about length, correct? It explained the importance of decision making when considering length. Now, consider the importance of judging the quality and magnitude of detail.

10-24-2016_bTHE DEVIL’S IN THE DETAILS FOR BETTER OR WORSE

Just as length of a document is an important consideration, the same goes for detail. Let’s simplify and call it data or support.  Whichever word catches your attention, both mean the same.  The bottom line, data and support can work for or against you. Too much, too little, too weak, too irrelevant, too ambiguous, it all matters. So, pay close attention to the ‘kind’ of detail.

10-24-2016_cHOW DO I JUDGE WHAT IS THE BEST?

  • Think Quality
  • Think Usefulness
  • Think Relevance

Giving attention to these areas with which to judge your data will help you select the most effectual means to sell your solution to the problem or your idea for a better process.

10-24-2016_dBACK TO THE OFFICE

If you fancy yourself a great business writer, always consider the length of your documents. If you fancy yourself a shrewd business entrepreneur with aspirations of climbing the corporate ladder, consider the type of data that would be most effective in putting together a successful:

  • executive summary
  • proposal
  • progress report

10-24-2016_eTHE ART OF DETAIL AND HOW TO PRESENT IT

Figuring out how to present your data in the most compressive, concise, and readable way is an art.

 

THE HOW TO’S

  • Light on Text, Heavy on Visualization – Text is okay, but try to use PowerPoint Slides, Tables, Charts as much as you can. Too many words will lose your reader even if there are numbers embedded. This is where ‘quality’ ‘comes into play. Pick the best presentation mode so as not to distract your audience. Keep it simple and clear.  It is important to interpret what the numbers are saying, ‘sales are up 12% because…’  Communicate this with the ‘least’ populated visual that will get your point across.
  • Merge Your Data– You must always strive to be concise. Yes, detail matters, but you must be the judge of how much is too much. As the case with length, how long is too long? My best advice is to narrow to the most essential for making your case. This is where ‘relevance’ comes into play. For instance, ‘call volume is down 6% due to the month being two business days shorter than the prior month’. Gather all your data and judge it according to the most relevant, then eliminate the rest.
  • Scrutinize for Accuracy – Researching and gathering data is no simple task depending on your project or goal. It is easy to accumulate and accumulate. But as I said earlier, it must be relevant. Not only must your data be relevant, it must be correct. This is where ‘usefulness’ comes into play. Seek to find the most reputable sources or experts in the field to make your case. If your office setting is somewhat unique and you wish to make a more local case for change with local support, test it as you would a scientist. Opinions and general story telling of what transpires during the day in a certain situation is not strong. Be ready to observe, measure, and take detailed notes that can be translated into hard statistics.

Next time, we’ll look at the third and final consideration for effective business communication, ‘consider your audience’.

For an expanded discussion on effective business writing and workplace etiquette, see my book:

Royce Murcherson, Ph.D., The Guide to Persuasive Business Writing: A New Model that   Gets Results. Iowa: Kendall-Hall, 2013

Clip Art, provided by Microsoft Office Professional Academic, 2010

If you want to develop or enhance your business communication skills, consider enrolling in the Business Office Systems & Support (BOSS) program at Richland College.

Richland College is located in northeast Dallas at 12800 Abrams Road. For more information, please contact Angela Nino at anino@dcccd.edu or call 972-238-6215.

**Richland College is an authorized Microsoft Testing Center.

***Get a Free Copy of Microsoft Office***If you are a student in the Dallas County Community College District, you are eligible to download a FREE version of Microsoft Office, which includes Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Access, Outlook, Publisher, and OneNote. You can install this software on up to 5 devices.

 

 

 

 

 


Congratulations to Professor Dee Hobson!

small-dee-hobson-image-with-frameCongratulations to Professor Dee Hobson on being selected as Richland College’s 2016-2017 Excellence in Teaching recipient!

“Dee,” as she is known to colleagues and to many of her students, is a full-time BOSS faculty member in Richland’s BOSS program, where she has taught for the past 17 years. Dee holds a Bachelor’s Degree in Business Teacher Education from Southern Illinois University and a Master’s Degree in Business Education from Memphis State University.

Dee brings a tremendous wealth of experience and knowledge to students who are enrolled her BOSS classes in many important ways, because she has

  • taught at private and public education institutions (both at the secondary and community college levels).
  • provided corporate training to a number of companies in the DFW area.
  • designed curriculum for public and private institutions.
  • created staff development programs and activities for several local DFW ISDs.
  • supervised and managed corporate personnel both in the United States and abroad.
  • served on the board of directors of the Dallas County affiliate of The Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation. She also received that organization’s Volunteer of the Year Award.
  • received Microsoft Office Specialist (MOS) software certifications over the years in the key Microsoft software applications–Word, Access, Excel, PowerPoint.

We are proud to call Dee one of our own, and we are thrilled that her on-going contributions to helping students succeed have received such laudatory recognition!

If you want to develop or upgrade your skills to help you in today’s job market, consider enrolling in the Business Office Systems & Support (BOSS) program at Richland College. You will have a wide selection of courses (offered online and face-to-face) from which to choose. These courses range from basic keyboarding, computer literacy, business communications, Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Access (includes preparation for the Microsoft Office Specialist certification exam**), office procedures, etc. These courses can all lead you towards a college-credit certificate or a 2-year associate’s degree.

Richland College is located in northeast Dallas at 12800 Abrams Road. For more information, please contact Angela Nino at anino@dcccd.edu or call 972-238-6215.

**Richland College is an authorized Microsoft Testing Center.

***Get a Free Copy of Microsoft Office***If you are a student in the Dallas County Community College District, you are eligible to download a FREE version of Microsoft Office, which includes Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Access, Outlook, Publisher, and OneNote, which can be used on up to 5 devices.


Why You Should Learn Excel!

Click on the YouTube video below to listen to the song that was created by University of Texas Professor Clint Tuttle and get an entertaining, enlightening serenade on why you should learn Microsoft Excel.

According to a 2015 U.S. News & World Report article, “If you want a better job, master Excel.”

Middle-skill Jobs—those jobs that require more than a high school diploma, but less than a bachelor’s degree—are considered the jobs that have long been associated with middle income wage earners. For example, jobs such as office and administrative assistants as well as managerial positions in industry, communications, retail, healthcare, and other major sectors want their employees to be proficient in spreadsheets—Excel.

In fact the demand for digital proficiency for these middle-skill jobs has only grown over time and will continue to grow. You can read more about these jobs by clicking this link to read the 2015 report (PDF file) prepared by Capital One Financial Corporation and Burning Glass Technologies.

Meanwhile, sit back and enjoy Professor Tuttle’s musical message—it’s the truth, folks!

GET DIGITALLY PREPARED TODAY by taking an Excel class or other Microsoft Office productivity software classes—Word, PowerPoint, Access, and Publisher—through Richland College’s BOSS Program. The Microsoft Office 2016 version and Windows 10 will be offered this coming fall!

**Richland College is an authorized Microsoft Testing Center for the Microsoft Office Specialist certification exams.

DYK–if you take a DCCCD class, you are eligible for a free download of the latest Microsoft Office 365 version? You can use your MS Office software on up to 5 devices!

Richland College is located in northeast Dallas at 12800 Abrams Road. For more information on BOSS class offerings, please call 972-238-6215 or email Angela Nino at anino@dcccd.edu.


Watch Your Mobile Manners!

With the widespread use of mobile devices such as smartphones, tablets, and smartwatches for communicating in the business environment, it’s important to remember the role of manners and why using good mobile etiquette counts.

Here are some are tips you should keep in mind when communicating on your mobile device. (Please click twice on the table below to get a larger view.)

2016-01-08_Table Image for Word Press Import

Source: Dianne S. Rankin and Kellie A. Shumack, The Administrative Professional: Technology & Procedures, 15th edition, Cengage Learning, Boston, 2017, pp. 125-126.

If you want to improve your communication skills, consider taking the BOSS program’s POFT 2312 Business Correspondence and Communication at Richland College.

Richland College, which is located in northeast Dallas at 12800 Abrams Road, offers both online and on-campus courses. For more information, please call Angela Nino, Lead Faculty, aedwords@dcccd.edu 972-238-6382.

**Richland College is an authorized Microsoft Testing Center.

***Get a Free Copy of Microsoft Office Pro Plus***If you are a student in the Dallas County Community College District, you are eligible to download a free version of Microsoft Office Pro Plus (or 2011 on the Mac) which includes Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Access, Outlook, Publisher, and OneNote.


Use the 7 Cs to Become a More Successful Communicator

Having a successful career depends on your ability to communicate effectively with others in the workplace. To become a good communicator, make sure you are aware of those important aspects oral communication—tone of voice, eye contact, and other body language signals.

Click the graphic below to review Evan Carmichael’s infographic on the 7 Cs of Communication, which illustrates 7 proven communication strategies that you should use as part of your oral communication toolkit.

02-08-2016 7 Cs Graphic

Source: Evan Carmichael, The Entrepreneur Blog, June 21, 2011
Link: http://www.evancarmichael.com/blog/2011/06/21/infographic-7cs-of-effective-communication/

If you want to improve your communication skills, consider taking the BOSS program’s POFT 2312 Business Correspondence and Communication at Richland College.

Richland College, which is located in northeast Dallas at 12800 Abrams Road, offers both online and on-campus courses. For more information, please call Angela Nino, Lead Faculty, aedwords@dcccd.edu 972-238-6382.

**Richland College is an authorized Microsoft Testing Center.

***Get a Free Copy of Microsoft Office Pro Plus 2013***If you are a student in the Dallas County Community College District, you are eligible to download a free version of Microsoft Office 2013 Pro Plus (or 2011 on the Mac) which includes Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Access, Outlook, Publisher, and OneNote.


2016 List of “Banished” Words and Phrases

01-19-2016 Word Cloud ImageCareful writers and speakers use good judgement and variety when choosing their words and phrases. However, it seems as though each year generates a new list of words and phrases that have garnered particular misuse and abuse over the year by far too many communicators, who should know better but who seem to be caught in the trap of misuse and abuse of the English language.

A list of the previous year’s most abused and misused words/phrases first appeared on January 1, 1976, compliments of the late W. T. Rabe, who was the public relations director at Lake Superior State University (LSSU) in Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan. Sadly, a new list of words and phrases has been generated on an annual basis ever since, and there doesn’t appear a shortage of content for future lists being added.

Below are the biggest offenders for 2015, along with explanations as to why they made the made the list. This newest list, which was published on January 1, 2016, by LSSU, represents the 40th annual list developed by LSSU—is there no shame?

So That’s right folks, you should never respond to a question by opening with the word “so.” Example: “What is your favorite pastime?” Answer: “So, my favorite pastime is hiking along nature trails.”
Conversation Media types from all areas seem particularly prone to misuse this word and substitute it for every type of verbal/written word that describes an exchange. “Conversation” seems to have pushed other words such as “discussion, chat, dialog, etc.” out of the way.
Problematic This word appears to have made its evolution and burst on to the scene thanks to the corporate world. If you want to indicate that something appears to be a problem, why not just say it that way?
Stakeholder First used to describe someone who has a stake in a matter or decision, now everyone, e.g., customers, clients, etc., are lumped into this category.
Price Point The comment left on the ISSU web site by one person declared, “It has no ‘point.’  It is just a ‘price.’” Makes sense!
Secret Sauce This phrase, which is meant to refer to some “secret” in “way too much information” detail have left some wondering if it was developed by someone in the fast food industry but somehow found its way into general business discussions.
Break the Internet Refers to a posted comment, photo, or video that may be controversial, that has gone viral, and that will overload the Internet servers and “break them.” What would all of us do if the Internet did break?
Walk it back Meant to show the retreat on or retraction of a statement or policy. We’ve seen politicians do this all the time. I wonder how exhausted they must be after so much “walking back”?
Presser Can you believe this “nonword” made it in to the vocabulary of some as a substitute for press release or press conference? We can do better!
Manspreading Sounds a little vulgar, but it is meant to describe someone taking up too much space on a bus or a subway transit system. This term (it, too, is a “nonword”) has then been used to describe other situations where someone takes more than his or her fair share. Didn’t we used to say “hogging” something?
Vape Used to describe the smoking of e-cigarettes, which actually emit vapor and not smoke. It would be wonderful if the person who left the comment at ISSU’s site, “I hope this one goes up in smoke,” gets his or her wish!
Giving me life This phrase refers to anything that may excite a person or something that may cause the person to laugh. Not good!
Physicality Yep, this noun has become popular in the sports world within the past couple of years, but really folks, what does it mean? It is being used to refer to an athlete or contest, but according to Merriman-Webster, the word physicality refers to, “the predominance of the physical usually at the expense of the mental, spiritual, or social.” Does this mean the body is supreme over the mind? You be the judge!

 

To see a complete list of words and phrases that have made their way to the “banished” list over this 40-year time period, please visit Lake Superior State University’s web site at

http://www.lssu.edu/banished/
If you want to improve your communication skills, consider taking the BOSS program’s POFT 2312 Business Correspondence and Communication at Richland College.

Richland College, which is located in northeast Dallas at 12800 Abrams Road, offers both online and on-campus courses. For more information, call 972-238-6215.

**Richland College is an authorized Microsoft Testing Center.

***Get a Free Copy of Microsoft Office Pro Plus***If you are a student in the Dallas County Community College District, you are eligible to download a free version of Microsoft Office Pro Plus (or 2011 on the Mac) which includes Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Access, Outlook, Publisher, and OneNote.