One Student’s Advice: The Right Way to Use Social Media When Job Hunting

There have been a lot of great articles and posts written by professionals about the phenomenon of social media and how to use it effectively when looking for a job. However, taking the advice of a fellow student might be one of the best methods to use as you navigate the world of social media when seeking employment. Courtney Cartwright, who is currently a student in the BOSS program at Richland, offers us some great insight into her experiences with social media and job hunting.

When Courtney was recently asked to respond to a discussion board on the topic of social media and whether it could be helpful in finding a job, here is what she had to say:

I do have a social media site, Facebook.

When I was laid off in August, I used my Facebook account to help find employment. I have several friends who work for major companies, and so I would ask them privately if they knew anyone who was hiring, and if so, if they could obtain the information for me to send my resume [to their companies].

I also used Craigslist to locate jobs. I actually got the job I am on now through Craigslist. However, after I was hired, I was told that they did a search for me on Facebook to make sure I wasn’t a “bad” person, or that I wasn’t posting things I shouldn’t be.

Some people don’t like to admit it, but employers do search for you online to make sure you are not going to embarrass their company, and they want to make sure [the people] they are hiring are good people. There are also several other job posting sites within Facebook that can help people find employment. Some temp agencies use Facebook as a tool to search out people who may be looking [for employment].

One of the most important things that Courtney mentioned in her post was the fact that employers do search social media sites to find out more about potential job candidates AND as a way to “weed out” people they consider as inappropriate for employment with them.

Some words of wisdom to job seekers include: “Be careful of what you post (this includes photos) because once it’s on the Internet, it is truly public!”

For more information on the BOSS program and how it can help you prepare for a successful career, contact Becky Jones, Associate Dean, bjones@dcccd.edu, 972-238-6215.