Category Archives: Chancellor

If You Want to Lead, First Learn to Speak

141184078This is a post from our former Chancellor, Dr. Wright L. Lassiter, Jr. This excerpt is from one of his last Weekend Memo articles before he retired. We were honored to learn from his experience and leadership knowledge through these posts.

From: Chancellor’s Weekend Memo # 358

IF YOU WANT TO LEAD, FIRST LEARN TO SPEAK

Many years ago while working at Tuskegee Institute (Alabama), I was introduced to Toastmasters International by two friends/neighbors.  I came away from that meeting totally impressed with the Toastmasters vehicle for becoming a top-quality speaker.  Over the years, I have subsequently earned the highest Toastmasters designation — Distinguished Toastmaster.  Additionally, at each institution where I was employed after leaving Tuskegee, I have chartered Toastmasters clubs.  A new Toastmasters Club at the district headquarters was recently chartered.

In this commentary, I am sharing eight elements to aid one in becoming an accomplished speaker.  Great speakers are not born — they are made!

Point #1  –  Be Yourself, Know Yourself.   Anyone giving a speech has to be clear about his/her own beliefs.  If you have a sense of clarity, then you can move on to technique.

Point #2  –   Know Your Audience.   Find out beforehand what the audience mix is, what it expects from you, and what the topic for the occasion is.  Just before you speak, mill about and talk with people.  Assess their level of sophistication on the subject about which you will be speaking.  Know your time slot and stick to it.  Remember, disappearance makes the heart grow fonder.  You can make friends with a short speech, enemies with a long speech.

Point #3  –  Sell Only One Idea.   The most effective speeches have at their core a single idea that can be written concisely.  A speech is essentially a sale; you are better off to sell one thing at a time.  Nail down that core idea, then, in your speech, hammer it over and over.  Know what you want the audience to repeat to you when the speech is over.

Point #4  – Reveal Yourself.   If you want the audience to relate to you, share something about yourself so people will feel that you are one of them.

Point #5 – Write it Several Times.   Writing is discovery.  Our ideas don’t come into our minds marching in lockstep.  Sit down and do it — then get it right.  Get it written — then rewrite.  Your first rewrite should be a complete overhaul.  Avoid the worn out and overused.  Get to the point.  It is not enough to shape your speech to one idea.  Make sure it is the right idea for that audience.  Follow this three-step process for creating, loading, and triggering core ideas: First, write down any ideas that may serve the core of the speech.  Then, put the list away.  Let it “simmer and germinate” for at least 24 hours. Second, select the single idea that will drive your speech.  Now, take that idea apart and examine its elements. Third, trigger the idea.  Put it into action at each stage of your speech.  You should begin with the idea and end with it.  Every paragraph, every sentence, every word should be linked in some way to it.

Point #6 – Don’t Waste the Introduction.   Let the person introducing you know that the introduction is very important to you — that it sets the stage.  Introductions can be like movie cartoons — injecting humor, change of pace, and new perspectives before the main event.  Avoid it being an obituary.

Point #7  – The Delivery.   When you are well prepared, it is far easier to be relaxed when speaking.  Even the best of speakers (if they are human) get butterflies at the beginning of a speech.  A way to overcome the “flutters” is to memorize your opener.  The worst thing you can do is ramble, trying to say everything.  Visual aids?  Be careful here.  Your audience did not come for a slide show or a sales presentation.  It came for a speech.

Point #8  –  Take Charge of the Question and Answer Period.   If a question and answer period is on the program, consider reducing the length of your speech to make time for it.  The beginning of the Q & A session is an abrupt transition from a speech.  You have been talking; now it is time to both talk and listen.  You must be sure to listen!

When it is all over, there is one cardinal rule:  decide how to improve the next time!  Hold on to these pointers as a reference tool and refer to it often.  Let it be a reminder of things to think about each time you make a speech!  Just — “food for thought.”

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For more information on how BOSS classes can help you become more productive and effective or information on the BOSS degree and certificates, contact Becky Jones, Associate Dean, bjones@dcccd.edu 972-238-6215.

Join us on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/groups/RLCBOSS/

 


Thoughts from the New Chancellor

157601193This is the first post from Dr. Joe D. May, the new Chancellor of the Dallas County Community College District.  We are honored to learn from his experience and leadership knowledge through these posts. Check back monthly for his posts!

Excerpt from: Chancellor’s Weekend Memo # 362

THIRST FOR LEARNING

A great deal of the values I hold and the way I think are the result of growing up in East Texas.  This background left me with an insatiable curiosity and a thirst for learning.  I am continually reading, listening to books-on-tape, and taking online courses.  I believe that if you are not learning new things, then you stop being innovative.

I am at the Dallas County Community College District for the same reason you are . . . to change the world through education.  We have achieved that goal in the past, and we will continue to do so into the future.

As I get to know you better, I am committed to leading our colleges toward greatness.  However, those efforts mean that we must all pull in the same direction.  We should never underestimate what we each can do every day to make a difference in the lives of both our students and our communities.

One of the greatest aspects of working at a community college is that we can easily find meaning in our work.  For those of us who believe in the community college mission, we know this is not just work — we are dedicated to improving other people’s lives.  I cannot think of a better calling.

Countless organizations say that they want to change the world; few, however, can actually make this happen.  Because we have outstanding people, resources, and commitment, I know that the best years of the Dallas County Community College District are ahead of us.  As the new chancellor, I couldn’t be more enthusiastic and optimistic.

Let’s change Dallas together,

Joe

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For more information on how BOSS classes can help you become more productive and effective or information on the BOSS degree and certificates, contact Becky Jones, Associate Dean, bjones@dcccd.edu 972-238-6215.

Join us on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/groups/RLCBOSS/


Is Your Team Happy?

Young adultsThis is another post from Dr. Wright L. Lassiter, Jr., the Chancellor of the Dallas County Community College District.  We are honored to learn from his experience and leadership knowledge through these posts. Check back monthly for his posts!

From: Chancellor’s Weekend Memo # 334

IS YOUR TEAM HAPPY?

Whenever I have a so-called “day off,” I use it to read, explore subjects, and clean up assembled folders and files.  I came across an article written by Susan David that appeared in a Harvard Business Review document.  She gave some pointers on how to create a happier team.  Before diving into the article, I pulled down one of my resources to refresh my memory on just what “happiness” is.

The dictionary definition is:  “state of contentment, joy and well-being; bliss; having it all together.”  The phrase, “having it all together,” is intriguing, is it not?  I wonder, who has it all together?

Joseph Addison writing in The Spectator (March 17, 1711) had this to say about happiness:  “True happiness is of a retired nature, and an enemy to pomp and noise; it arises, in the first place, from the enjoyment of one’s self; and in the next, from the friendship and conversation of a few select companions.”  I believe we all can relate to this thought from Addison.

Robert G. Ingersoll had an interesting thought about happiness that appeared in his Creed in the late 19th century.  He wrote, “Happiness is the only good.  The time to be happy is now.  The place to be happy is here.  The way to be happy is to make others so.”

Research shows that happy people have better health, are more creative, produce better results, and are willing to go the extra mile.  What’s more, happiness is contagious; it creates a virtual spiral that leads to further engagement.

Susan David has some interesting things to say about happiness that I felt compelled to share with my colleagues.

To the question, “How can leaders create happier organizations?” she describes three pathways:

Perhaps the first step is to clarify what we mean by “happy.”  Psychologists typically identify happiness by three distinct pathways.  The first is the “pleasant life,” which involves positive experiences, including contentment, hope, and sensory enjoyment.  This kind of well-being is often referred to as “hedonia,” based on the Greek term for pleasure.  The second is the “engaged life,” or “eudaimonia.”  The ancient Greeks believe in a “daimon,” or guardian spirit, that would guide you toward your destiny; the word also means genius.   The engaged life thus refers to a person’s ability to deploy his personal genius — to use his unique strengths and talents in a way that engages and absorbs him.  The third pathway is the “meaningful life,” which relates to the desire to be part of something bigger than oneself — to belong and contribute to an institution that has purpose.

It is my conclusion that all three of the pathways — pleasure, engagement, and meaning — are important.  Perhaps we, as educational leaders, can use the knowledge of these pathways to ask questions like the following:

•           Do my colleagues enjoy their relationships and the environment at work?

•           Do my colleagues laugh?

•           Are my associates in the right roles — ones that fit their skill sets and offer appropriate challenge?

•           Do my colleagues get to use their genius?

•           Do my colleagues feel they are a part of something that matters?

For more information on how BOSS classes can help you become more productive and effective or information on the BOSS degree and certificates, contact Becky Jones, Associate Dean, bjones@dcccd.edu 972-238-6215.

Join us on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/groups/RLCBOSS/


The Change Imperative

151532165This is another post from Dr. Wright L. Lassiter, Jr., the Chancellor of the Dallas County Community College District.  We are honored to learn from his experience and leadership knowledge through these posts. Check back monthly for his posts!

From: Chancellor’s Weekend Memo # 332

THE CHANGE IMPERATIVE

It is important that all embrace the view that the change imperative and initiative must encompass the entire institution/system.  I would ask all of us to consider the following essentials for success during change.

•           Commit to Change.   Know that change must happen and implementation rarely goes exactly as expected, but when everyone is committed, chaos is eliminated.  This is critical to remaining engaged, productive, and looking forward to the future.

•           Lead Change.   Be a part of one of the diverse groups of individuals who cross all levels of the organization, driving the change initiative, execution, and implementation.

•           Be Clear About the Objective and Outcome.  When you are clear about the vision of the post-change environment, it is easier to remain motivated through the challenges.  Write an exhaustive list of personal and institutional benefits of the change, and remain informed by asking questions and keeping up as the change progresses.

•           Communicate Consistently.  Maintain a clear understanding about what needs to change and why, expectations of you and your team, and the success milestones.  The continuing mantra should be:  when in doubt, ask.

•           Encourage Positive Engagement.  We all want recognition for a job well done or an effort above and beyond what is required or expected.  Request feedback from your boss/leader, or a colleague whose work depends on the quality of your work.  Give feedback where you can.  Provide or suggest training for those who seem to need it and ensure clarity for those who do not understand the change.  Change is slow, chaotic, or stalled when there are communication and engagement gaps.  Work to avoid or eradicate these.

For more information on how BOSS classes can help you become more productive and effective or information on the BOSS degree and certificates, contact Becky Jones, Associate Dean, bjones@dcccd.edu 972-238-6215.

Join us on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/groups/RLCBOSS/


The Change Cycle

150878885This is another post from Dr. Wright L. Lassiter, Jr., the Chancellor of the Dallas County Community College District.  We are honored to learn from his experience and leadership knowledge through these posts. Check back monthly for his posts!

From: Chancellor’s Weekend Memo # 335

THE CHANGE CYCLE

Ann Salerno and Lillie Brock have written an interesting book titled The Change Cycle (Berrett-Koehler Publishers), and I wanted to share excerpts.

Change creates emotion, commotion, and stress.  Why?  People fear loss of control, divorcing themselves from their old habits and ways, dealing with the “new,” questioning their future, and pondering what the new year will hold.  To understand and overcome these fears, the authors explain the six stages of The Change Cycle:

•           Loss.   Think about specific losses change might create.  Then, start problem-solving.

•           Doubt.  When change hits, it usually comes with information gaps. That is why employees speculate.

•           Discomfort. It is only natural to feel overwhelmed when change arrives.  Discomfort opens the door to the upside of upside down.  Here is an opportunity to learn to work smarter, not harder.

•           Discovery. Working smarter changes your perspective.  You can play on your strengths.

•           Understanding.   What you have learned puts you back in control.

•           Integration.   Thriving during changes requires flexibility.

For more information on how BOSS classes can help you become more productive and effective or information on the BOSS degree and certificates, contact Becky Jones, Associate Dean, bjones@dcccd.edu 972-238-6215.

Join us on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/groups/RLCBOSS/


Collaboration – Signs To Pay Attention To

Multiracial Hands Making a CircleThis is another post from Dr. Wright L. Lassiter, Jr., the Chancellor of the Dallas County Community College District.  We are honored to learn from his experience and leadership knowledge through these posts. Check back monthly for his posts!

From: Chancellor’s Weekend Memo # 337

COLLABORATION — SIGNS TO PAY ATTENTION TO

In my previous commentary, I shared the work of the Chancellor’s Team to address key questions as a background piece on the subject of collaboration.  Following the group definition of collaboration, these questions were addressed:  (1) Why should we collaborate? (2)  What are the key questions to be addressed in order to effectively collaborate? (3) Do we want to be good collaborators?  The commentary concluded with a listing of benefits to be derived from effective collaboration.

Today’s commentary will address the costs associated with collaboration and a suggested simple and practical process developed by author and executive coach Marshall Goldsmith on how to improve collaboration within teams.

Cost Consideration and Challenges

•           In developing financial efficiencies, one college might not benefit from every decision.

•           In improving the District, there could be a loss of individual power.

•           To be more cost effective and efficient requires a will to cooperate.

•           To be recognized as a leader in higher education with student success could result in the need for strategic centralization.

•           To avoid duplication of effort could require more time on task.

•           Time invested now saves time in the future.

•           Making the most of our resources could result from external forces.

•           To speak with one voice necessitates a leadership directive.

•           Consider the strategic use of a facilitator when addressing the issue of competition.

•           Good and honest communication is an imperative.

•           In addressing student success, our work should be process driven.

•           A single vision should be a driver for performance improvement.

•           Fighting for dollars causes diminished interest in the best overall decisions.

Marshall Goldsmith Guidance

Marshall Goldsmith outlines what he calls a process for “team building without time wasting.”  For effective team meetings, he suggests a four-step process:

1.         Assess the current level and the desired outcome of teamwork.           In a team meeting, ask each team member to consider the questions, “How well are we doing?” and “How well do we need to be doing?” in terms of teamwork.  Then, have each team member write down a score from 1 to 10 for each question on a blank piece of paper and hand it in.  Calculate the average score for each question.  Based on Goldsmith’s experience, the result is going to be “We are a 5.8.  We need to be an 8.7.”

2.         Identify behaviors that would close the gap.                 Assuming there is a gap between “we are” and “we need to be,” ask each team member to list on another piece of paper what two key improvements in behavior would help close the gap and improve teamwork.  Goldsmith cautions to make it clear to team members that they are not to single out people, but rather behaviors, such as listening better, articulating clear goals, and so forth.  Next, go around the room asking everyone to share what they wrote and record their answers on a flip chart.  When everyone has spoken, ask the group to vote on which behavior would have the largest positive impact on group effectiveness.

3.         Have team members interview one another.    Have each team member conduct a three-minute, one-on-one meeting with every other team member.  In these sessions, each person should ask, “Please suggest one or two positive changes I can make individually to help our team work together more effectively.”  Then, have each person pick one behavior to focus on improving.

4.         Make the learning ongoing.   Goldsmith suggests having a monthly follow-up process in which each team member asks the other members for suggestions on how to continue his/her improvement.  The conversation should focus on the specific areas identified for individual improvement, as well as general suggestions for everyone on the team.

He offers that these conversations are most effective when both parties respect two simple rules:

  • The person receiving the suggestions cannot critique them.  His/her role is just to listen and say “thank you.”
  • The person making the suggestions must focus not on the past but on the future.

Goldsmith concludes his article with this statement: “In my work with many different teams, I have learned that those that practice this very efficient process can make huge improvements in teamwork in very little time.”

For more information on how BOSS classes can help you become more productive and effective or information on the BOSS degree and certificates, contact Becky Jones, Associate Dean, bjones@dcccd.edu 972-238-6215.

Join us on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/groups/RLCBOSS/


Collaboration

74879093This is another post from Dr. Wright L. Lassiter, Jr., the Chancellor of the Dallas County Community College District.  We are honored to learn from his experience and leadership knowledge through these posts. Check back monthly for his posts!

From: Chancellor’s Weekend Memo # 336

COLLABORATION

What follows is a working document from the Team that addresses:  Definition of collaboration; Why should we collaborate? In order to collaborate, we must; We want to be good collaborators for what benefit?  Your attention is drawn to the following points on these elements.

Definition

Collaboration is a partnership based on trust, good communication, using the strength of all.  Collaboration is a planning method with well-defined outcomes and written documentation; it is process driven.  In the DCCCD, collaboration is designed to build a culture of shared learning, with a focus on a future that is the good of all.

Why should we collaborate?

•           To save money, operate more efficiently, and optimize our results.

•           To be the recognized leader in higher education.  When DCCCD looks good, we all look good.

•           To spend our competitive energies on our competitors, not each other.

•           We agree that it is good for students.

In order to collaborate, we must:

•           be assured that no college succeeds at the expense of another;

•           trust each other enough to make the best decision for the whole at the occasional expense of the individual;

•           not let fear of centralization and loss of power override what is best for the majority of students;

•           be willing to speak openly and honestly about our positions, and be willing to hear the positions of others;

•           not choose a decision because it is the easy one;

•           have someone in a leadership role who is willing to facilitate the group to win-win;

•           ensure that the individual SACSCOC accreditation of each college is supported through any and all collaborations.

These are the benefits to be derived from collaboration, as crafted by the Leadership Team:

•           To develop financial efficiencies

•           To be the “best”

•           To improve our District

•           To be more cost effective and efficient

•           To be recognized as a leader in higher education with student success

•           To avoid duplication of effort

•           To play to our strengths

•           To make the most of our resources, including money

•           To ensure that our public voice representing the DCCCD and its colleges is consistent

•           The world is big — we are one county

•           Competition is growing

•           To be more successful with students as a result of shared learning

•           To improve performance

•           To maximize institutional effectiveness

•           To improve student success for the sake of students

•           To actually achieve strategic goals

•           To achieve better results and efficiencies

•           Better student outcomes.

For more information on how BOSS classes can help you become more productive and effective or information on the BOSS degree and certificates, contact Becky Jones, Associate Dean, bjones@dcccd.edu 972-238-6215.

Join us on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/groups/RLCBOSS/


What Inspires You?

157601193This is another post from Dr. Wright L. Lassiter, Jr., the Chancellor of the Dallas County Community College District.  We are honored to learn from his experience and leadership knowledge through these posts. Check back monthly for his posts!

From: Chancellor’s Weekend Memo # 338

WHAT INSPIRES YOU?

Have you ever given thought to that frequently used word “inspiration”?  Have you ever asked yourself the question, “How inspired am I?”  Have you pondered the question, “What motivates me to be a better person, or to do better work?”  Maybe it is a memorable phrase you heard from someone or it is something that you read.  Perhaps it is an individual or an enlightening experience that inspires you.  Sometimes, unpleasant experiences can also result in your being inspired to learn from such experiences.

LinkedIn recently launched an Inspiration Index which asked members to “chime in” on how inspired they are.  Jacquelyn Smith, a member of the editorial staff at Forbes magazine, studied the index.  She wrote in an article that, as it turned out, age and gender play a large role regarding what inspires individuals.  There were 3,200 respondents; females under age 29 tend to feel less inspired than their male peers — but that changes as they age.  Women older than 65 tend to feel considerably more inspired than men.

Demographics and occupations are also factors.  The research revealed that a person’s line of work has something to do with the inspiration factor.  Individuals who hold creative jobs in the public interest tend to be more inspired than others.  The top five most inspired industries include fine arts, religious institutions, sports, professional training and coaching, and nonprofit organizational management.  Higher education was a component in the nonprofit category.

To find out exactly what inspires successful individuals — what it is that adds joy and meaning to their work — LinkedIn asked some of the most accomplished leaders to weigh in and articulate about the inspiration factor in their lives.  What follows are the responses from three “leadership influencers”:  Richard Branson, Naomi Simson and Kathryn Minshew.

Some may know of Richard Branson, founder of the Virgin Group.  What inspires him are “game-changing people.”  He stated that “My professional inspiration has no separation from my personal inspiration.  It is people who will stop at nothing to make a positive difference in the lives of other people.”  He said, “If you are creative, then inspiration can come from anywhere.  Creators are never fully satisfied.  They can always be better.  They are determined to change the game for good.”

Naomi Simson, founder of RedBalloon, had this to say:  “Tell me I ‘cannot’ do, be or have something — and that is the surest way to inspire me into action.”  She continues, “What inspires me is simply when the ‘impossible becomes possible’ — to tackle a problem and never give up, no matter how challenging.”

Simson had the thought early in her life that people never took her seriously.  It was the need to prove herself to others that fueled her relentless pursuit to create a best workplace for growth — to show those who said she could not, that she could.

She is equally inspired by the success stories of others who create the possible from the impossible.  Simson says, “If I hear a story of someone who has overcome the odds, worked hard, remained focused, fulfilled on his or her word — and has been relentless in changing the world to make it a better place — I feel unbelievably inspired and uplifted.”

Kathryn Minshew, founder and CEO of The Muse, said what inspires her is an elevation that can get her unstuck at work.  She writes, “When I need a confidence boost, a cure for the professional doldrums, or just a fresh shot of career inspiration, I’ve found that one of the best tricks is literally going up — to the highest peak you can find.”  So she has practiced climbing high hills, peaks, and even mountains.

In one of your quiet moments, colleagues, why not ponder the question, “What is it that inspires me?”  You may be surprised; you may be uplifted.  Food for thought, colleagues.

For more information on how BOSS classes can help you become more productive and effective or information on the BOSS degree and certificates, contact Becky Jones, Associate Dean, bjones@dcccd.edu 972-238-6215.

Join us on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/groups/RLCBOSS/


Chancellor’s Post – Leadership Courage

This is the another post from Dr. Wright L. Lassiter, Jr., the Chancellor of the Dallas County Community College District.  We are honored to learn from his experience and leadership knowledge through these posts. Check back monthly for his posts!

From: Chancellor’s Weekend Memo #328

Serving others and doing the right thing is not always easy.  Leaders sometimes have to reach deep within themselves to find the strength and courage to resist temptations or to stand up for moral principles when others may ridicule them or when they may suffer financially or emotionally for their actions.

Some would say that without courage, leadership cannot exist.  However, for many leaders working in large organizations like the DCCCD, the importance of courage is easily obscured.  The approach taken by some is to get along, fit in, and do whatever serves one’s self-interest.  In a world of stability and abundance, leaders can often forget even the meaning of courage, so how can they know where to find it when they need it? The current environment, however, is not one of stability and abundance.

We now must take risks.  The courage to take risks has always been important for living a full, rewarding life.  Yet, the courage to resist jumping on the bandwagon and taking unnecessary or unethical risks is equally important.  In the community college environment of today, things are constantly changing and leaders thrive by solving problems through trial and error.  They create the future by moving forward in the face of uncertainty, by taking chances, by acting with courage. In the DCCCD, this is best exemplified by the bold actions that had to be taken to adjust to revenue shortfalls.

You see, the defining characteristic of courage is the ability to step forward through fear.  Courage does not mean the absence of doubt or fear, but the ability to act in spite of them.  As Senator John McCain puts it, “Fear is the opportunity for courage, not proof of cowardice.”

In fact, if there were no fear or doubt, courage would not be needed.  People experience all kinds of fears, including fear of death, mistakes, failure, embarrassment, change, loss of control, loneliness, pain, uncertainty, abuse, rejection, success, and public speaking.  It is natural and right to feel fear when real risk is involved, whether the risk is losing your life, losing your job, losing acceptance by peers, losing a loved one, or losing your good reputation.  Consider that Charles Darwin put off publishing The Origin of Species for two decades because he feared public scorn and ridicule from his peers.  But many fears are learned and prevent people from doing what they want.  True leaders step through these learned fears to accept responsibility, take risks, make changes, speak their minds, and fight for what they believe.

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For more information on the Business Office Systems and Support department, contact Becky Jones, Associate Dean, bjones@dcccd.edu 972-238-6215.


To Achieve Your Dreams, Remember Your ABCs

This is the another post from Dr. Wright L. Lassiter, Jr., the Chancellor of the Dallas County Community College District.  We are honored to learn from his experience and leadership knowledge through these posts. Check back monthly for his posts!

From: Chancellor’s Weekend Memo #280

TO ACHIEVE YOUR DREAMS, REMEMBER YOUR ABCs

This is the time of year when all institutions of education have commencement — graduation and completion programs.  We who speak on those occasions share messages in the hope that the graduates/completers will remember at least one or two cogent points.  It occurs to me that the messages at commencement are also appropriate for each of us in our personal and professional lives.  Watch your “ABCs” that are offered for your consideration:

Avoid negative sources, people, places, things, and habits.

Believe in yourself.

Consider things from every angle.

Don’t give up, and don’t give in.

Enjoy life today; yesterday is gone, and tomorrow may never come.

Family and Friends are hidden treasures.  Seek them and enjoy their riches.

Give more than you planned to give.

Hang on to your dreams.

Ignore those who try to discourage you.

Just do it!

Keep on trying.  No matter how hard it seems, it will get easier.

Love yourself first and most.

Make it happen.

Never lie, cheat, or steal.  Always strike a fair deal.

Open your eyes and see things as they really are.

Practice makes perfect.

Quitters never win, and winners never quit.

Read, study, and learn about everything important in your life.

Stop procrastinating.

Take control of your own destiny.

Understand yourself in order to better understand others.

Visualize it.

Want it more than anything.

Xccelerate” your efforts.

You are unique of all God’s creations.  Nothing can replace you.

Zero in on your target and go for it!

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For more information on the Business Office Systems and Support department, contact Becky Jones, Associate Dean, bjones@dcccd.edu 972-238-6215.