Are Two-Year Colleges Sometimes Better than Four-Year Universities?

graduation-hatCommunity colleges (also known as junior colleges) offer a two–year degree called an associate degree. A student with a strong academic record at a community college can then transfer to a more expensive state or private college for two more years to earn a bachelor’s degree.

However, the second function of community colleges is to prepare students for the job market by offering associate’s degrees in the career and technical areas and entry-level career training. Adult students who want to upgrade their skills for workforce reentry or advancement are also using the offerings of community colleges.

For some, community college is an opportunity to get extra academic guidance and support. Community colleges often have small class sizes. The priority of the faculty is teaching, not research. Plus there are generally lots of support services, such as mentoring programs and organized study groups. The difference in cost between a community college and a four-year university is substantial.

Read what the Washington Post had to say in an article published on June 29, 2015 regarding community colleges:  What’s wrong with going to a community college? How two-year colleges can be better than four-year universities.

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