Tag Archives: visual arts

‘Squares and Stripes’ Exhibit in Brazos Gallery, Sept. 30-Oct. 25

Brazos Gallery will feature “Squares and Strips,” an exhibit by artist Lane Banks, Sept. 30-Oct. 25. This exhibit will showcase paintings of geometric shapes in varying configurations.

This show comprises works from two series that developed more or less simultaneously.  One group is Concentric Squares, which has been ongoing for several years, and paintings from this set have been shown numerous times in various venues recently.  The other group, Horizontal Stripes, is smaller, with just six altogether.  They have not previously been shown.  Both groups use only a range of grays and metallic hues, what I have been calling an industrial palette, to distinguish the colors from spectrum or natural hues.  They all are hard-edged using straight lines and multiple layers of paint to give the surface an opaque effect that keeps the eye of the viewer on the surface instead of penetrating into an illusionist depth.

The squares are classical in their symmetry and are made up of a series of mathematical relationships and proportions that are determined before the painting is begun.  The paintings are conceived as a series of concentric forces compressing toward the center, or conversely, radiating outward from it.

The stripes use a vertical rectangular format that consists of stripes or bands of color of differing widths.  The canvas is divided down the center vertically from top to bottom, which contrasts with the horizontal bands in order to reconcile the opposing forces of the two directions.  The central divide is conceived as an upward or downward shift in the horizontal movement of the bands, so that the band is broken and disrupted at the midpoint, continuing as a different color and width on the other side of the divide.

These works are abstract rather than abstractions, the difference being that an abstraction is rooted in perception, what the eye can see, and the resulting work is a distillation, reduction or essence of what was observed, regardless of how far removed from its source the work appears to be.  An abstraction is therefore dependent upon a subject outside itself for its existence.  My abstract works are entirely conceptual, in that they are invented with no reference to anything outside themselves.  They are a physical, visual embodiment of an idea that consists of proportions and colors of areas relative to each other and to the framing edge of the painting.

An artist reception will take place from 11 a.m. to noon Tuesday, Oct. 22.

For questions, contact Charles Coldewey at ccoldewey@dcccd.edu or ext. 6339.


Brazos Gallery Presents “LUX” by Andrew Kochie, Through July 19

The Brazos Gallery presents “LUX” by Andrew Kochie, with the exhibit being up through July 19. In this exhibit, Andrew pushes the boundaries of refraction and light on hand-etched aluminum panels, which are balanced with works that play with shadow. “LUX” also includes QR Code technology that will reveal stories and thoughts behind the pieces.

Andrew is a Dallas-based visual artist and cultural advocate. His body of work is a synthetic blend between abstract and trompe l’oeil illusion (a flat or painted object that looks three-dimensional), ranging from abstract minimalism to hard-edge geometric abstraction. He is a pioneer in metallic trompe l’oeil. 

This summer exhibit will open with an artist talk from 11 a.m.-noon June 19 and a reception from 7-9 p.m. June 21.

For more information, visit https://rlc5.dcccd.edu/gallery/richland-galleries/about/.


Pair of arts events mark JFK assassination

Richland College will present a pair of art events to commemorate the 50th anniversary of President John F. Kennedy’s assassination.

On Nov. 21, Richland will host a lecture by Chicago-based artist Lou Mallozzi on his latest exhibit, Peers. The live-performance piece is comprised of Lee Harvey Oswald’s statements made from the moment of Kennedy’s assassination until the moment of his own death. The 33-minute text is recited by 12 people in unison — “a stand-in for the jury Oswald never had.” The performance will take place at 6 p.m. on Nov. 22 at the artist-run space Beefhaus and will coincide with the exhibition “The Artists’ Commission” on display at Gray Matters Gallery. Mr. Mallozzi will discuss Peers at 3 p.m. on Nov. 21 in Room WH103 of Wichita Hall at Richland College.

plum-puddingOn Nov. 22, Richland College will open an installation in the Brazos Gallery by Los Angeles-based artist Vincent Ramos entitled, Plum Pudding Peanut Island (Gilligan’s Squaw Fire Island II). The work is inspired by the collective sense of loss and confusion surrounding President Kennedy’s assassination. Mr. Ramos recruited volunteers from the Richland College student body to “utilize dialogue, movement and various character and plot lines” from a handful of network television shows that were preempted as a result of the Kennedy assassination. The performance piece will be intertwined within a site-specific installation inspired by various facets of Kennedy’s biography. Mr. Ramos describes Plum Pudding Peanut Island as “a body of work steeped in a disjointed pictorial and verbal language: a labyrinth of non-linear actions, narratives and emotions.” The exhibition opens on Nov. 22 and performances will take place at various points during its run through Dec. 20.

About the artists
Lou Mallozzi is a sound artist based in Chicago who makes performances, installations and recorded works. He is on the faculty of the Sound Department of The School of the Art Institute of Chicago and is executive director of Experimental Sound Studio in Chicago.

Vincent Ramos received a BFA from Otis College of Art and Design in 2002 and an MFA from the California Institute of the Arts in 2007. Mr. Ramos lives and works in Los Angeles. Mr. Ramos’ solo and two-person exhibitions include, Motown Took Us There and Motown Brought Us Back, Crisp London/Los Angeles. Group exhibitions include, Made in L.A. 2012, Hammer Museum and LAXART, and, In the Good Name of the Company, ForYourArt, Los Angeles and See Me Gallery, New York.