Category Archives: Garland Campus

Richland College Garland Campus Offers Night and Weekend Classes

exterior of Richland College Garland CampusRichland College Garland Campus is offering night and weekend classes for the spring semester in the areas of AutoCAD, SolidWorks, machine operator, welding and IC3 certification. Classes begin Jan. 3.

“Richland College Garland Campus has recognized a need in our community to offer additional night and weekend classes for working adults and those with less flexible schedules,” said Kimberly Wilkins, Richland College Garland Campus workforce training coordinator. “These classes are perfect for anyone looking to upgrade their skills or even change careers. The Garland Campus is local, tuition is reasonable and we provide quality training with quality instructors.”

Registration for classes at Richland College Garland Campus begins Nov. 18. Prospective students can register online at richlandcollege.edu/schedules or by phone at 972-238-6146.

Richland College Garland Campus is located at 675 W. Walnut Street, across the street from the downtown Garland DART station on the blue line.

Richland College Receives $449,988 Skills Development Fund Grant to Train Associa Employees in Richardson

Representatives from Richland College, the Texas Workforce Commission, Associa and the City of Richardson pose with a check for a grant intended to train Associa employees. From left: Texas Workforce Commission Chairman Andres Alcantar; Richland College Garland Campus Dean of Resource Development Shellie Heard; Texas State Senator and Associa President; CEO and Chairman John Carona; Richland College President Kay Eggleston; and Richardson Mayor Laura Maczka.Richland College, Texas Workforce Commission (TWC), the City of Richardson and Associa representatives were present at a check-signing ceremony Wednesday morning at the Associa Shared Services Center in Richardson to award Richland College with a $449,988 Skills Development Fund Grant by the TWC.

The grant will be used by the Richland College Garland Campus to train 222 new hires and 79 incumbent workers at Associa’s Shared Services Center. Employees will begin their training next week.

“Richland College Garland Campus appreciates the ongoing confidence that the Texas Workforce Commission and area businesses and industries place in us as an experienced, dependable, high-quality and results-focused skills and workforce training provider,” said Richland College President Kay Eggleston. “We continue to remain ready and willing to serve the training and education needs of our community, and we look forward to meeting and exceeding your expectations for workforce training with Richardson businesses and industry partners such as Associa.”

Event speakers included Eggleston; Richland College Garland Campus Dean of Resource Development Shellie Heard; TWC Chairman Andres Alcantar; Texas State Senator and Associa Shared Services Center President, CEO and Chairman John Carona; and Richardson Mayor Laura Maczka.

More than 300 of Associa’s Shared Services Center employees also attended the ceremony, where they learned more about how the grant would affect them and their employer.

“It helps you acquire the skills that are going to be necessary to do a job that is needed in the facility right behind us and allow this company to continue to create opportunities for the new people that will be coming in next week and next month,” Alcantar said to the Associa employees in attendance. “Go out there and get the job done.”

“This generous grant from the Texas Workforce Commission will give our employees the skills they need to provide unsurpassed service, as well as to help strengthen the Richardson business community, said Carona. “We are grateful—very grateful—for this unprecedented opportunity, the first of its kind not only for Associa, but for our industry as a whole.”

“On behalf of the entire Associa family this morning, I would sincerely like to thank the Texas Workforce Commission, Richland College and of course the City of Richardson for this unique opportunity,” said Carona. “Thank you all so much.”

Associa is North America’s largest community association management firm with more than 150 branch offices in the United States, Mexico and Canada. The company serves homeowner associations of all types, including condo, mixed-use, master-planned, luxury high-rise, active-adult, resort and golf communities.

Richland College and City of Garland Team Up for Employee Training Initiative

As Richland College instructor Angie Whitney began to wrap up her customer service class at the City of Garland Unified Learning Center, she asked each of the 25 students in her class that day to tell her what each took away from the session.

Richland College instructor Angie Whitney teaches a class of City of Garland employees.

Richland College instructor Angie Whitney

Answers ranged from better ways to phrase questions to customers, to nonverbal cues to look for, to even that common sense is not universal.

“Common sense only makes sense to whom it is common to,” Whitney replied to the student.

Whitney is one of several Richland College corporate trainers participating in a collaborative effort between the college and the City of Garland. The end goal is to provide comprehensive, real-world training to city employees that will equip them to serve more efficiently the surrounding community and Garland residents.

“Richland College Garland Campus has become a full-service training provider for several area cities and many corporate clients, and we go to great lengths to make sure we provide the highest quality instructors to our clients,” said Konley Kelley, assistant dean of corporate services at Richland College Garland Campus.

The City of Garland’s relationship with Richland College is based on an expectation that the college will offer the top-level instruction upon which it has built a reputation, and as such Richland College has become the city’s “go-to” resource for training on a variety of subjects. According to Susan Fair, City of Garland’s workforce engagement and development administrator, students have also come to expect a high level of training and mutual understanding with Richland College instructors.

Richland College instructor Elke Brautigam teaches a class of City of Garland employees.

Richland College instructor Elke Brautigam

“Students look at the instructors as if they’re city employees, which in a way they are,” said Fair. “And there is a camaraderie and trust factor that goes with that.”

Richland College courses offered to City of Garland employees include Ethics for Municipal Government, Business Writing, Command Spanish, Computer Skills, Managing to Lead and Customer Service. Richland corporate trainers Elke Brautigam; Tim Colman; Hamaria Crockett, Ph.D.; Karen Hettish and Whitney teach these classes.

“All of our instructors are contributing to the success of this partnership,” said Kelley. “They all have huge, well-attended classes and are creating an impact with the different topics they are teaching.”

Richland College instructor Hamaria Crockett, Ph.D.,  teaches a class of City of Garland employees.

Richland College instructor Hamaria Crockett, Ph.D.

Whitney and the other instructors often receive feedback from students about how much they are learning in the classes taught by Richland College instructors and that word is spreading among employees that the training is truly valuable in the workforce. For instance, some employees with the Garland Senior Center realized that some of the paperwork was not serving the seniors very well. Because of the customer service training they attended, the employees worked to modify the paperwork in a way that made it better and easier for their clients, the seniors, to understand.

“By going through the customer service class, the impact was they modified their data to better suit the customer, which in the end is who the data are for,” Whitney said.

Over the past few years, the partnership between Richland College and the City of Garland has seen tremendous growth, with four to six classes each month serving City of Garland employees.

Richland College instructor Karen Hettish teaches a class of City of Garland employees.

Richland College instructor Karen Hettish

“We have to keep training real, relevant and fun in order for it to stick,” said Fair. “This isn’t old school anymore. My job with the City of Garland is to make sure people are prepared in their roles. Everyone is a leader in his or her job. We make decisions, and we need outcomes every day.”

“This has been a deep, solid partnership, and I love that this training is a priority for this city. This is what the City of Garland is all about,” Konley concluded.

Richland College Garland Campus is an award-winning community campus focused on workforce training and development. Training is provided for individuals who are entering the workforce for the first time or for those currently employed who want to enhance their skill sets. For more information, visit richlandcollege.edu/garlandcampus.

IC3 offered this fall at Richland College Garland Campus

Get the digital literacy skills you need to succeed in today’s marketplace! Enroll in the IC3 (Internet and Computing Core Certification) program at Richland College Garland Campus.
 
IC3 provides students with globally accepted, standards-based credentials through this three-course certification in computer fundamentals, computer applications and Internet fundamentals. Successful completion of the IC3 program demonstrates to employers, businesses and educational institutions that students possess validated skills with computer hardware, software and networks and the Internet.
 
Registration opens Aug. 5 and classes begin Sept. 2. For more information about the IC3 program at Richland College Garland Campus, contact Bilen Dimiru at 972-238-3760 or bdimiru@dcccd.edu, and visit www.richlandcollege.edu/garlandcampus.​

Garland Campus, DCMA receives training grant

From left: John Byrne, General Manager, Work Area Protection;  Ramon Otero, Human Resources Manager, RHE Hatco, Inc.; Dr. Kay Eggleston, President, Richland College; Cindy Burkett, State Representative; Hope Andrade, Commissioner Representing Employers, Texas Workforce Commission; Reagan Francis, Human Resources Generalist, Atlas Copco Drilling Solutions LLC; Jeannie Hill, representing State Senator Bob Duell; Akylah Fuller, Human Resources Generalist, Sherwin Williams; Amy Mueller, representing County Commissioner Mike Cantrell; and Al Jackson, Training Manager, Sherwin Williams.

From left: John Byrne, General Manager, Work Area Protection; Ramon Otero, Human Resources Manager, RHE Hatco, Inc.; Dr. Kay Eggleston, President, Richland College; Cindy Burkett, State Representative; Hope Andrade, Commissioner Representing Employers, Texas Workforce Commission; Reagan Francis, Human Resources Generalist, Atlas Copco Drilling Solutions LLC; Jeannie Hill, representing State Senator Bob Duell; Akylah Fuller, Human Resources Generalist, Sherwin Williams; Amy Mueller, representing County Commissioner Mike Cantrell; and Al Jackson, Training Manager, Sherwin Williams.

Richland College Garland Campus and Dallas County Manufacturers’ Association received a $358,246 check on Jan. 24 from the Texas Workforce Commission. Commissioner Hope Andrade presented the funds to Richland College and five Dallas County Manufacturers’ Association companies for workforce skills training. Companies included in the grant are Atlas Copco Drilling Solutions, RHE Hatco Inc., Sherwin Williams (Garland, Arlington, Ennis and Waco plants), Unity Mfg. and Work Area Protection. The grant provides funding for Richland College to instruct 345 employees for a more than 9,250 training hours. Training under the grant includes “Lean Manufacturing,” programmable logic controls fundamentals, CPR/first aid, Six Sigma Green Belt, Microsoft Office, welding and forklift certification.

Richland College, DCMA to receive grant to train workers

MEDIA ALERT

WhoRichland College Garland Campus and Dallas County Manufacturers’ Association

What: Commissioner Hope Andrade from the Texas Workforce Commission will present a $358,246 check to Richland College and five Dallas County Manufacturers’ Association companies for workforce skills training. The grant provides funding for Richland College to instruct 345 employees for a more than 9,250 training hours.

When: 2 p.m. on Jan. 24, 2014

Where: Richland College Garland Campus, 675 W. Walnut Street in Garland

For more information, contact Tandy Dollar at tdollar@dcccd.edu or 214-360-1221.

Richland College trains new employees for Bush Center, Perot Museum

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Richland College Corporate Services’ track record of providing exceptional training for area businesses has resulted in the opportunity to work with some of Dallas’ most prestigious institutions.

Training offered by Richland College came highly recommended to leaders of the Perot Museum of Nature and Science, so they contacted Konley Kelley, assistant dean of corporate services, in fall 2012. Richland College provided training for the museum’s new employees.

Richland College’s successful relationship with the Perot Museum, which opened in December 2012, opened the door a few months later to work with another high-profile client – the George W. Bush Presidential Center which opened in May 2013.

“The Perot Museum referred us to the George W. Bush Presidential Center,” Mr. Kelley said. “Our partnership with the Bush Center has been phenomenal. It is a an excellent story about quality training, local collaboration and making a difference with great customer service.”

Angie Whitney, an energetic, savvy corporate trainer for Richland College, has been teaching the customer service classes for the Perot Museum and the Bush Center. She said Richland College was in the running with other top, national, professional development organizations including the Disney Institute.

“Working with the Perot Museum and the Bush Center is a big deal,” Ms. Whitney said. “These are marquee clients. They bring a ‘celebrity’ factor. We have had and will continue to have business from doing this training.”

Every employee and volunteer at the Bush Center, which houses the Bush Presidential Library, Museum and Bush Institute, will complete Ms. Whitney’s customized, introductory-level customer service program.

“That’s nearly 450 participants at the Bush Center,” Mr. Kelley said. “Ultimately, I anticipate Angie will have led classes for nearly 1,000 employees and volunteers at the two institutions.”

At the Bush Center, Ms. Whitney’s “Customer Service 100 – First Impressions” class teaches participants how to communicate with the center’s guests and create a welcoming atmosphere.

In a recent training class, Ms. Whitney educated participants about the various ways Bush Center patrons will experience the museum (through sight, sound and touch) and how to effectively use communications styles – verbal (actual words used), vocal (tone of voice) and non-verbal (body language).

In her training, Ms. Whitney stresses the importance of remaining culturally neutral as visitors to the museum come from many backgrounds and beliefs.

“We’re here to meet their needs at the museum,” she said. “That means communicating well, but it also means knowing when to step back and let them just experience it for themselves.”

One area of the museum that is better experienced with less guidance is the September 11 exhibit. This section includes a multimedia display of images, the iconic bullhorn Mr. Bush used when addressing the crowd at Ground Zero and a twisted piece of steel from one of the World Trade Center buildings.

“Unless visitors engage you, you should avoid interaction in the 9/11 area,” she said. “It’s very emotional for some people. It brings back memories and I’ve seen people fighting back tears. So hang back, but be ready if people want to talk to you.”

Part of Ms. Whitney’s training addresses how employees should to respond to controversial statements or provocative questions from patrons. All presidents have critics and that doesn’t change once they leave office, Ms. Whitney told the class.

The highest priority for Bush Center employees and volunteers is to be professional, courteous and neutral. She taught the class not to engage in political conversations. Neutrality is important even when patrons have positive comments.

“The biggest compliment you can receive is for people not to know your political views,” Ms. Whitney encouraged. “It’s not your job to agree, argue or apologize. You can simply say that the Bush Center is a federal, non-partisan facility, and we don’t discuss politics.”

Class participants ran through some scenarios to practice remaining neutral, and many members of the class found that aspect of the training helpful.

“We really learned how to handle sticky situations. We have to be professional at all times,” said Sandra Clark, a Bush Center employee. “Angie had lots of visuals and she’s outgoing and friendly. She was very thorough.”

Walking through the museum lobby after the class, a bubbly docent reached out with a bright smile to shake hands with Ms. Whitney.

“Your class was great!” said Cindy Belisle, Bush Center volunteer. “It made me think. I have to anticipate what the people coming here are thinking. We learned so much. Thank you!”

It’s no wonder that Ms. Whitney has been nominated for a 2013 Excellence in Teaching award, one of Richland College’s highest honors. Recipients of the awards, given in full-time, adjunct, continuing education and associate faculty categories, will be announced in August at Richland College’s Fall Convocation.

Richland College Garland Campus’ Machine Operator Program offers new skills, new life for students

For Chris Cleveland and Sherille Bell, Richland College Garland Campus’ Machine Operator Program was more than just an educational opportunity – it was a lifeline.

In 2010, Chris was living with his mother and working at Kroger making $7.35 an hour. His family was facing eviction and $7.35 an hour wasn’t enough to help. Chris went for a walk to clear his head.

Chris Cleveland at his job with Nova Magnetics, Inc.

Chris Cleveland at his job with Nova Magnetics, Inc., in Garland.

He wandered by Richland College’s Garland Campus on Walnut Street and decided to go inside. Chris started talking with a security officer who told him about the Machine Operator program and encouraged him to talk to Ron Bowman, the program administrator.

Chris found out that the 12-week Machine Operator program was designed for people ages 18-21 with high school diplomas or GEDs. It teaches students the skills they need to be immediately employable in today’s high-tech manufacturing industry. Through a grant, funded by Workforce Solutions Greater Dallas, the program is offered at no cost to students who qualify for assistance.

Chris qualified and jumped at the chance.

“I realized from the beginning that the program was a good idea,” Chris said. “It’s not easy. You have to do the work. No one is handing you anything. I had to make it work or be out on the streets.”

Today, Chris works for Nova Magnetics in Garland making $10 an hour. He feels optimistic about his future and career.

“I was definitely prepared from what I learned in the Machine Operator Program and it motivated me to develop new skills on the job. I’m learning everything I can,” Chris said. “Who knows what I would be doing if I hadn’t gone to Richland College Garland Campus. Maybe I’d still be working making $7.35 an hour and living with my mom. I know I couldn’t have been on my own for the past three years. I am proud of that.”

Sherille Bell using the equipment in the Richland College Garland Campus machine operator lab.

Sherille Bell using the equipment in the Richland College Garland Campus machine operator lab.

Sherille Bell also needed a change. She returned to the Dallas area in 2012 and was staying with her aunt, who lives near the Garland Campus. Sherille said at that time, her life wasn’t headed in the right direction and she needed to do something to change.

Her aunt encouraged her to see if the Garland Campus could help. Sherille started Machine Operator classes the week after she visited.

Sherille worked hard and completed the program. She now works for GTM Plastics in Garland.

“This is the first real job I’ve ever had in my life,” Sherille said. “Finishing the program and getting a job makes me feel good. My first baby is on the way and I can support my child. My mom wasn’t there for me but now I can change that for my child.”

Richland College Garland Campus developed the Machine Operator program in 2009 in response to the needs voiced by the Dallas County Manufacturers’ Association.

Prospective students don’t need any manufacturing experience to start the program. The course consists of 10 weeks of classroom instruction including shop math, blueprint reading and machine shop lab plus a two-week, unpaid internship. It also includes an OSHA 10 certification and a forklift operator certification – extras which frequently give graduates an advantage when job hunting.

“Manufacturing companies are looking for individuals who can work well with a team, have problem-solving skills, critical-thinking skills, computer literacy, creativity and a good attitude,” Mr. Bowman said. “We work with students to make sure they have the opportunity to succeed.”

Mr. Bowman said the program has a 75 percent placement rate for its graduates.

Enrollment is open now for the Machine Operator program. Information sessions about the program are held every Tuesday and Thursday at 9 a.m. at the Garland Campus, 675 W. Walnut Street.

To learn more, visit www.richlandcollege.edu/garlandcampus/machineoperator or contact Ron Bowman at ronb@dcccd.edu or 214-360-1201. Richland College Garland Campus is an equal opportunity institution.

Funds to provide training for Garland workers

20130110-0738 (TWC
From left to right: (First Row) Ron Jones, Garland mayor; Ronald Congleton, Texas Workforce Commissioner; Dr. Kay Eggleston, Richland College; Stephanie Bryant, Apex Tool Group; Avni Amih, Carlisle Coatings and Waterproofing; Karmen Glaesman, Carlisle Coatings and Waterproofing; (Second Row) Kaz Yamamoto, Sanden Vendo America; Judy Hughes, Sanden Vendo America; Robert Jones, Altronics Controls; Jon Diggs, Interceramic; Paul Mayer, Garland Chamber of Commerce; Dr. Wright Lassiter, DCCCD; and Marvin Fisher, SilverLine.


Richland College Garland Campus received a $363,550 grant check on Jan. 10 from Texas Workforce Commission. With the funds, the Garland Campus will partner with the Dallas County Manufacturers’ Association (DCMA) to provide skills training for more than 200 Garland-area employees.

Training in areas such as leadership development, lean manufacturing and project management will be provided to DCMA’s participating Garland employers including Altronics Controls, Apex Tool Group, Automatic Products Corp., Carlisle Coatings and Waterproofing, Hunter Panels, Interceramic, Mapei, Sanden Vendo America and SilverLine.